News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week ending November 29, 2019
====================================================


The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published on the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF.  Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

Current and former grantees featured in this issue: Access Now, Amnesty International, The Bureau of Investigative Journalism, Center for Democracy and Technology, Creative Commons, Dejusticia, EFF, EU DisinfoLab, Free Software Foundation, Internet Archive, Public Knowledge, Wikimedia.


NEWS
=====

Internet Society Privatizes .org Generic Top-Level Domain Registry
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The Internet Society has announced it will sell the .org generic top level domain name registry to the private equity firm Ethos Capital, after which Public Interest Registry, the owner of .org since 2003, will discard its non-profit status, Kieren McCarthy reports at The Register. The sale follows the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers decision to lift price caps on .org domains for the next ten years. At The Longest Now, Sam Klein calls the decision a race toward regulatory capture and provides additional background. At its blog, EFF details its six months of efforts to persuade ICANN to remove contract provisions that make it easier for authorities to censor NGOs' websites. A coalition of organizations including EFF, Free Software Foundation, Internet Archive, Creative Commons, Public Knowledge, Wikimedia, and numerous others representing museums, the Scouting movement, volunteers, and non-profits have sent an open letter asking the Internet Society to reconsider. Organizations and individuals may sign on at the Save Dot Org website.
https://www.theregister.co.uk/2019/11/20/org_registry_sale_shambles/
https://blogs.harvard.edu/sj/2019/11/23/a-tale-of-icann-and-regulatory-capture-the-dot-org-heist/
https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2019/11/nonprofit-community-stands-together-protect-org
https://www.eff.org/document/coalition-letter-sale-public-interest-registry
https://savedotorg.org/

UK: AI Use Exacerbates Racism and Disempowerment
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A new algorithmic tool for categorizing prisoners in UK jails risks automating and embedding racism, exacerbating the problems exposed in a 2017 review by the Labour MP David Lammy, Croften Black warns in a new report for the Bureau of Investigative Journalism. At UK Authority, Michael Cross summarizes the objections of UK Supreme Court Justice Lord Philip Sales to digital government depersonalization of public services, which turns individuals into powerless "serfs".
https://www.thebureauinvestigates.com/stories/2019-11-14/prisoner-risk-algorithm-could-program-in-racism
https://www.ukauthority.com/articles/judge-sounds-serf-warning-on-digital-public-services/

Russian Law Requires Domestic Software on New Devices
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Under a new law, Russia will ban the sale of an as-yet unpublished list of smartphones, computers, and smart TVs that do not include preinstalled Russian software, the BBC reports. Bill co-author Oleg Nikolayev claims the intention is to show users there are Russian alternatives to Western software; critics fear that the requirement will lead manufacturers to withdraw from the Russian market and that the software will be used to spy on users.
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-50507849

INTERPOL Specialist Group Seeks to Ban End-to-End Encryption
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At the behest of the US Department of Justice and Federal Bureau of Investigation, the 37th meeting of the INTERPOL Specialists Group on Crimes against Children issued a draft resolution banning end-to-end encryption and blaming the technology industry for child exploitation, Sean Gallegher reports at Ars Technica.
https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2019/11/think-of-the-children-fbi-sought-interpol-statement-against-end-to-end-crypto/

Fake Local Media Outlets Seek to Spread Indian Influence
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A coordinated network of 265 fake local media outlets in more than 65 countries is managed by India's Srivastava Group in order to influence institutions and elected representatives, provide NGOs with press material, and influence public perceptions of Pakistan, EU DisinfoLab reports. The lab will soon publish a full report and welcomes contributions.
https://www.disinfo.eu/2019/11/13/uncovered:-265-coordinated-fake-local-media-outlets-serving-indian-interests/

Big Tech Business Models Depend on Systematic Violation of Human Rights
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A new report from Amnesty International argues that Google's and Facebook's business models fundamentally depend on constant surveillance and systematic violation of human rights, and that while their power has so far kept governments and regulators from holding them accountable, the era of self-regulation is ending,  Christine Fisher reports at Engadget. In another new report, Dejusticia analyzes the privacy policies of 30 companies with data-driven business models active in Colombia to identify practices overlooked by the country's data protection regime. At Slate, Elena Botella examines leaked documents to reveal that Facebook gains $132.80 in revenues per US or Canadian user. At The Correspondent, Jesse Frederik and Maurits Martijn present data showing that we actually do not know whether online advertising works.
https://www.engadget.com/2019/11/21/facebook-google-amnesty-international-human-rights/
https://www.amnesty.org/en/documents/pol30/1404/2019/en/
https://www.dejusticia.org/en/publication/accountability-of-google-and-other-data-driven-business-models-data-protection-in-the-digital-age/
https://slate.com/technology/2019/11/facebook-six4three-pikinis-lawsuit-emails-data.html
https://thecorrespondent.com/100/the-new-dot-com-bubble-is-here-its-called-online-advertising/13228924500-22d5fd24


FEATURES AND ANALYSIS
====================

Proposals Favor Geoblocking Open Access Research
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In this blog posting at the LSE, Martin Eve argues that we should resist proposals to use geoblocking to limit access to the countries that were involved in funding research and its publication or to countries that have strong open access policies. Giving in to insularity impedes the benefits of research and compromises the moral argument for open access.
https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/2019/11/11/if-we-choose-to-align-open-access-to-research-with-geo-political-borders-we-negate-the-moral-value-of-open-access/

Health Care Provider Ascension Hires Google to Manage Patient Data
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In this radio clip and transcript at NPR, Shannon Bond discusses the $2 billion contract under which Google manages clinical data collected by Ascension, a large Catholic health care system that operates hospitals and doctors' offices in 20 US states and Washington, DC. Ascension and Google respond that Google is not allowed to use the data, which is kept encrypted, for advertising or research. The news broke a few days after Reuters reported that Google will acquire Fitbit for $2.1 billion, promising that Fitbit users' health and wellness data will not be used for ads.
https://www.npr.org/2019/11/14/779208282/google-health-data-project-under-scrutiny
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-fitbit-m-a-alphabet-idUSKBN1XB47G

Privacy-Related Organizations Accept Funding from Google and Facebook
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In this article at Bloomberg, Daniel R. Stoller investigates Google's and Facebook's donations to think tanks and NGOs that work on privacy issues, and suggests the donations influence these organizations' work with legislators and journalists. The seven organizations listed are: Center for Democracy and Technology, Future of Privacy Forum, Access Now (total donations $208,000), EFF ($30,000), Brookings Institution, Cato Institute, and American Enterprise Institute.
https://news.bloomberglaw.com/privacy-and-data-security/facebook-google-donate-heavily-to-privacy-advocacy-groups

Digital Technologies Threaten Academic Freedom
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In this forum from International Studies Perspectives, researchers examine various aspects of the impact of online centralization, censorship, and surveillance on scholarship. In order to avert the threats to academic freedom being brought by harassment, exploitation, centralized infrastructure, monitoring via "smart" campuses and classrooms, and anti-terrorism initiatives, it is increasingly essential to improve "digital hygiene".
https://academic.oup.com/isp/advance-article/doi/10.1093/isp/ekz016/5584393

Global Players Fund African Fintech Sector
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In this Quartz article, Yomi Kazeem surveys the state of the fintech sector in Africa, where 66% of the adult population are unbanked and for whom new companies and technologies offer an opportunity for financial inclusion. In Kenya, financial inclusion has risen to 83% since M-Pesa mobile money launched in 2007. Entrants into these markets include startups backed by American giants PayPal, Visa, Stripe, and Mastercard alongside others backed by Chinese companies and investors. In a Twitter thread, Ruby on Rails creator David Heinemeier Hansson reports that the Apple Card's algorithm assigned him 20 times the credit limit offered to his wife even though they file joint returns, have been married a long time, and live in a community property state. At the New York Times, Yiren Lu explains the workings in China of WeChat's miniprograms, which offer easy access to payment processing for small and medium-sized businesses moving online.
https://qz.com/africa/1751701/everything-you-need-to-know-about-african-fintech/
https://twitter.com/dhh/status/1192540900393705474
https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2019/11/13/magazine/internet-china-wechat.html

How to Identify AI Snake Oil
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In this interview at IEEE Spectrum, Janelle Shane, author of You Look Like a Thing and I Love You, explains to Eliza Strickland that the narrower the problem the AI is asked to solve, the smarter it will seem. At BoingBoing, Cory Doctorow summarizes Princeton computer scientist Arvind Narayanan's guide to recognizing AI snake oil. Narayanan divides current AI into three categories: perception (making rapid progress), automating judgment ("imperfect but improving"), and predicting social outcomes ("fundamentally dubious").
https://spectrum.ieee.org/tech-talk/robotics/artificial-intelligence/blogger-behind-ai-weirdness-thinks-todays-ai-is-dumb-and-dangerous
https://boingboing.net/2019/11/21/debullshitifying-ai.html

White Nationalists Operate Openly on Facebook
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In this article at the Guardian, Julia Carrie Wong reports on the open operations of white nationalists on Facebook and the company's refusal to take action to stop them. Active groups such as Red Ice TV, now banned from YouTube, and VDare, the Affirmative Right, and American Free Press, as well as two Holocaust denial organizations, have longstanding Facebook pages. Despite critics' objections, Facebook includes Breitbart News on its list of trusted sources of information.
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2019/nov/21/facebook-white-nationalists-ban-vdare-red-ice


***

DIARY
==============
If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

Munin Conference on Scholarly Publishing
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November 27-29, 2019
Tromsø, Norway
The Munin Conference is an annual conference on scholarly publishing and communication, primarily revolving around open access, open data and open science.
http://site.uit.no/muninconf/

CPDP 2020
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January 22-24, 2020
Brussels, Belgium
The 2020 edition of Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection has issued a call for panels in all areas related to technological privacy and data protection.
https://www.cpdpconferences.org/call-for-panels

FAT* 2020
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January 27-30, 2020
Barcelona, Spain
ACM FAT* is an annual conference dedicated to bringing together a diverse community to investigate and tackle issues in this emerging area. Topics of interest include the theory and practice of fair machine learning, measurement and auditing of deployed systems, users' experience of algorithms, and the ethical, moral, social, and policy implications of big data and ubiquitous intelligent systems.
https://fatconference.org/

Meeting of the Minds Annual Summit
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February 19-21, 2020
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Attending the Meeting of the Minds Annual Summit is an opportunity for anyone seeking cross-disciplinary strategies and partnerships that deliver scalable, transferable, and equitable solutions to urban neighborhoods.
https://meetingoftheminds.org/events/motm2020

AI@Work
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March 5-6, 2020
Amsterdam, Netherlands
From automating simple tasks to predicting efficiencies, AI has much to offer business. Yet we have also been warned: AI will reinforce biases, hide important decisions, and deplete employment. Are we headed to a smarter workplace, or a dumber future? AI@Work will go beyond siloed debate: computer scientists, ethicists, academics, policy makers, and business leaders will come together to share ambitions, experiences, concerns, and visions.
https://ai.reshapingwork.net/

AI Summit 2020
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March 16-17
Brussels, Belgium
Politico's AI Summit returns to Brussels to tackle key questions about the future of AI global regulation and the technology's implementation. The conference will consider whether and how AI development should be limited, different cultural interpretations of "trustworthy," and the challenges of implementing a cross-border and coordinated European approach to AI.
https://diievents.dii.eu/ai-summit/

TICTeC 2020
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March 24-25, 2020
Reykjavik, Iceland
mySociety created TICTeC to bridge the gap between civic tech and research ñ to bring two different communities together, to emphasize the importance of being able to demonstrate impact, and to share what those impacts are. Because Reykjavik's city Council has pioneered using digital tools to elicit feedback from citizens on council policies, expenditures, and projects, the 2020 conference will provide a special opportunity to learn from Iceland's extensive civic technology and civic engagement experience.
https://www.mysociety.org/2019/09/20/join-us-in-reykjavik-for-tictec-2020/

We Robot 2020
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April 2-4, 2020
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
We Robot is an interdisciplinary conference on the legal and policy questions relating to robots. The increasing sophistication of robots and their widespread deployment everywhere - from the home, to hospitals, to public spaces, and even to the battlefield - disrupts existing legal regimes and requires new thinking on policy issues. The conference fosters conversations between the people designing, building, and deploying robots, and those who design or influence the legal and social structures in which robots will operate.
https://techlaw.uottawa.ca/werobot

Global Privacy Summit
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April 7-8, 2020
Washington, DC, USA
Global Privacy Summit will gather more than 3,600 professionals from around the world for an outstanding program with a truly global focus.
https://10times.com/global-privacy-summit

AI for Good
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May 4-8, 2020
Geneva, Switzerland
The AI for Good Global Summit is the leading United Nations platform for global and inclusive dialogue on AI. The Summit is hosted each year in Geneva by the International Telecommunications Union in partnership with sibling UN agencies, the XPRIZE Foundation, and ACM.
https://aiforgood.itu.int/

re:publica 2020
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May 6-8, 2020
Berlin, Germany
re:publica is Europe's largest internet and digital society conference. More than 19 500 participants from 80 countries came together to discuss current issues of digital society at the three-day festival. Participants represent a cross-section of (digital) society, which include professionals from economics, politics, business, hacker culture, NGOs, media, and marketing, as well as bloggers, activists, artists, and social media experts.
https://re-publica.com/en

Creative Commons Global Summit
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May 14-16, 2020
Lisbon, Portugal
The 2019 CC Summit gathered nearly 400 Creative Commoners from across the globe to attend over 130 sessions and seven keynotes. The Summit, comprising discussion, debate, workshops and planning, talks, and community building, is for anyone who's interested in the global movement for the commons as an activist, advocate, artist, librarian, educator, lawyer, or technologist.
https://creativecommons.org/2019/08/28/cc-global-summit-lisbon-may-14-16/

Privacy Law Scholars
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June 4-5, 2020
Washington, DC, USA
Organized jointly by BCLT and the George Washington University Law School, the Privacy Law Scholars Conference (PLSC) assembles a wide array of privacy law scholars and practitioners from around the world to discuss current issues and foster greater connections between academia and practice. PLSC brings together privacy law scholars, privacy scholars from other disciplines (economics, philosophy, political science, computer science), and practitioners (industry, legal, advocacy, and government).
https://www.law.berkeley.edu/research/bclt/bcltevents/2020-privacy-law-scholars-conference/

Festival of AI and Emerging Technology
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June 8-10, 2020
London, UK
CogX draws together speakers from industry, government, and academia to create "a space to learn, discover, and connect with the people and technologies that are shaping the future of humanity".
https://cogx.co/

RightsCon
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June 9-12, 2020
San JosÈ, Costa Rica
Each year, RightsCon, organized by AccessNow, gathers over 1,000 expert speakers from around the world.
https://www.rightscon.org/

Aspen Ideas Festival
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June 27-July 3, 2020
Aspen  Colorado
Presented by the Aspen Institute in partnership with The Atlantic, the Aspen Ideas Festival is a public gathering place for leaders from around the globe and across many disciplines to present and discuss the ideas and issues that both shape our lives and challenge our times. Anyone may purchase a pass to attend.
https://www.aspenideas.org/pages/register

WEIS 2020
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June, 2020 (TBD)
Brussels, Belgium
The annual Workshop on the Economics of Information Security crosses the disciplines of economics, behavioural science, and computer security.
https://weis2020.econinfosec.org/

FTC PrivacyCon
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July 21, 2020
Washington, DC
The US Federal Trade Commission's fifth annual PrivacyCon, which is free and open to the public, will focus in particular on the privacy of health data collected, stored, and transmitted by mobile apps.
https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/events-calendar/privacycon-2020

Wikimania
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August 2020
Bangkok, Thailand
Wikimania 2020 will be the 16th Wikimania conference, an annual event for the international Wikimedia community.
https://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/Wikimania_2020

DEF CON 28
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August 6-9, 2020
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
DEF CON is one of the oldest and largest continuously running hacker conventions.
https://defcon.org/index.html

Netroots Nation
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August 13-15, 2020
Denver, Colorado, USA
For more than a decade, Netroots Nation, which began as a convention for the most active members of the DailyKos community, has hosted the largest annual conference for progressives and other organizers and advocacy groups, drawing thousands of attendees from around the country and beyond, to develop their work around topics such as sharing data, developing technology talent, and managing digital campaigns.
https://www.netrootsnation.org/

86th World Library and Information Congress
----------------------------------------
August 15-21, 2020
Dublin, Ireland
WLIC is the annual conference of the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA).
https://2020.ifla.org/


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News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week ending November 15, 2019

====================================================
The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published on the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF.  Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

Current and former grantees featured in this issue: Citizen Lab, EDRi, EFF, Open Rights Group.


NEWS
=====

Twitter Employees Charged with Spying for Saudi Arabia
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The US Department of Justice has arrested and charged two Twitter employees with spying for Saudi Arabia by accessing the company's information on dissidents who use the platform, Ellen Nakashima and Greg Bensinger report at the Washington Post. The case is significant both because Twitter is Saudi's de facto public space (according to Human Rights Watch researcher Adam Coogle) and because court papers link at least one of the spies to Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. At YCombinator's Hacker News, a Twitter employee who worked with one of the arrestees describes the tools they had available and efforts to fix them.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/national-security/former-twitter-employees-charged-with-spying-for-saudi-arabia-by-digging-into-the-accounts-of-kingdom-critics/2019/11/06/2e9593da-00a0-11ea-8bab-0fc209e065a8_story.html
https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=21470898

WhatsApp Sues NSO Group
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Facebook's WhatsApp subsidiary has launched a lawsuit in a California court against the Israeli cyber-weapons company NSO Group claiming that the company's technology was used to attack more than 1,400 of its users, Stephanie Kurchgaessner, Nick Hopkins, and Oliver Holmes report at the Guardian. At least 100 of those users were democracy activists, journalists, and academics, whom the company warned privately when it discovered the attacks. At Reuters, Christopher Bing and Raphael Satter report that Citizen Lab, which worked with WhatsApp to identify the hacking targets, found that among them were high-profile government and military officials spread across at least 20 countries on five continents.
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2019/nov/01/whatsapp-hack-is-serious-rights-violation-say-alleged-victims
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-facebook-cyber-whatsapp-nsogroup/exclusive-whatsapp-hacked-to-spy-on-top-government-officials-at-u-s-allies-sources-idUSKBN1XA27H

India Commissions Facial Recognition Database to Link to Aadhaar
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The Indian National Crime Records Bureau has published a 172-page document requesting bids from companies to build what is likely to become one of the world's biggest facial recognition databases, Glyn Moody reports at Privacy News Online. The database would be a single, central resource accessible to police in the country's 29 states and seven union territories. At Reuters, Rina Chandran adds that Indian authorities say the country is severely under-policed, and needs facial recognition technology to compensate. At Comparitech, Paul Bischoff reports that its latest survey of the world's top 100 most-surveilled cities, based on the number of CCTV cameras per 1,000 residents, finds that eight of the top ten are Chinese; the others are London (placed sixth) and Atlanta (tenth). Also high-ranked are the Indian cities of Delhi and Chennai. Comparitech finds little correlation between the number of public CCTV cameras and crime or safety.
https://www.privateinternetaccess.com/blog/2019/11/beyond-aadhaar-india-wants-to-create-a-giant-centralized-facial-recognition-database/
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-india-tech-facialrecognition-trfn/mass-surveillance-fears-as-india-readies-facial-recognition-system-idUSKBN1XH0S9
https://www.comparitech.com/vpn-privacy/the-worlds-most-surveilled-cities/

Data-Driven Policing Leads to Racial Profiling
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Data-driven policing is leading to racial profiling, the European Network Against Racism finds in a new report. Authors Eric Kind and Patrick Williams find that new technologies such as mobile fingerprinting scanners, crime analytics, social media monitoring, and mobile phone extraction will disproportionately add to the over-policing of minority communities, even though law enforcement agencies present them as race-neutral, unbiased, and objective. The research was supported by the OSF Information Program and Open Justice Initiative,
https://www.enar-eu.org/Data-driven-policing-is-leading-to-racial-profiling

Internet Archive Helps Expand Wikipedia's Sourcing
----------------------------------------------------------------------
A new initiative by the Internet Archive is allowing Wikipedia to improve its reliability by providing a two-page preview of books cited as sources, Klint Finley reports at Wired. The Archive's Wayback Machine has scanned 3.8 million books, with more millions waiting, and is digitizing other analog media; also, its InternetArchiveBot tool scans Wikipedia for broken links and adds links to stored copies in the Wayback Machine. In a blog posting, Archive founder Brewster Kahle says books are critical to informing "a generation of digital learners". In a speech to the Indian Young National Academy of Science, longtime activist Carl Malamud outlines his efforts to grant Indian scientists the scientific literature access they need to conduct text and data mining, and calls the ongoing "colonization of knowledge" a "moral travesty".
https://www.wired.com/story/internet-archive-wikipedia-more-reliable/
https://blog.archive.org/2019/10/29/weaving-books-into-the-web-starting-with-wikipedia/
https://public.resource.org/speech.inyas.20191106.pdf (PDF)

Abuse Drives Female Politicians to Resign
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Women in early political careers make up a disproportionately large number of the 70-plus British MPs who are standing down in the December 12 general election, Frances Perraudin and Simon Murphy report at the Guardian. Many highlight the abuse, threats, and intimidation that have become part of their daily lives as politicians. At the Washington Post, Meagan Flynn reports that in her resignation speech Congresswoman Katie Hill cited the double standards and "misogynistic culture" that led her to resign after her estranged husband gave her nude images to conservative news sites without her consent.
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2019/oct/31/alarm-over-number-female-mps-stepping-down-after-abuse
https://www.washingtonpost.com/nation/2019/10/28/after-resigning-rep-katie-hill-vows-battle-revenge-porn-which-critics-blame-her-downfall/


FEATURES AND ANALYSIS
====================

EFF Urges Adoption of DNS-over-HTTPS
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In this press release, EFF urges the US Congress to support implementing DNS-over-HTTPS (DoH), a protocol for encrypting domain name system (DNS) requests that Mozilla and Google are incorporating into web browsers, in order to embed encryption more deeply into the internet, thereby improving privacy and impeding governments' ability to track and censor people. At Ars Technica, Timothy B. Lee explains why ISPs are largely opposed: DoH will remove some of their control. An Open Rights Group report released in June welcomes encrypted DNS, but argues that turning it on should always be a user choice. In a net.wars posting, Wendy M. Grossman outlines the UK controversy over implementing DoH: ISPs are opposed to DoH because it will increase centralization and disable some of their security techniques, and others because it will break the workarounds used to block access to child abuse images.
https://www.eff.org/press/releases/eff-and-partners-urge-us-lawmakers-support-new-doh-protocol-more-secure-internet
https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2019/09/isps-worry-a-new-chrome-feature-will-stop-them-from-spying-on-you/
https://www.openrightsgroup.org/about/reports/dns-security-getting-it-right
https://www.pelicancrossing.net/netwars/2019/05/namesakes_1.html

Active Russian Facebook Influence Operation Targets African Countries
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In this posting, the Stanford Internet Observatory summarizes its new paper documenting the connections between Yevgeny Prigozhin, best known for running the Internet Research Agency troll farm, and an active Facebook influence operation targeting Libya, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Madascar, Mozambique, and Sudan. The operation also leverages public WhatsApp and Telegram groups.
https://cyber.fsi.stanford.edu/io/news/prigozhin-africa

Twitter and Facebook Take Opposite Approaches to Political Advertising
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this Guardian article, Julia Carrie Wong discusses Twitter's decision to ban political advertising as the UK's politicians campaign for re-election and the US 2020 presidential race ramps up, raising the pressure on Facebook to do likewise. Separately, Wong reports Facebook's decision to exempt politicians from third-party fact-checking because it "believes in freedom of expression". In a video clip at CNBC, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) pushes Zuckerberg to explain his company's policies on disseminating false information. In a second clip at C-Span, Joyce Beatty (D-OH) probes Facebook's commitment to diversity. At the New Yorker, Sue Halpern discusses the difficulty of regulating narrowcast political ads and calls Mark Zuckerberg's free speech argument a deceptive use of the word "free". At the New York Times, Siva Vaidhyanathan argues we need legislation to force companies to cease using personal data for microtargeting. Based on his six months as head of global elections integrity for Facebook, Yaël Eisenstat argues in the New York Times that because Facebook's profits depend on amplifying lies and selling targeting tools, tinkering with advertising policies won't work. Finally, in an EDRi blog post summarizing UN Special Rapporteur David Kaye's sixth report on information and communication technology, Ella Jakubowska outlines his specific recommendations to help states and Internet companies comply with the fundamental principles of human rights when designing efforts to control online hate speech.
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2019/oct/30/twitter-ban-political-advertising-us-election
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2019/oct/10/facebook-trump-politics-technology-zuckerberg
https://www.cnbc.com/2019/10/23/aoc-grills-zuckerberg-over-facebook-allowing-lies-in-political-ads.html
https://www.c-span.org/video/?c4824601/user-clip-rep-beatty-questions-zuckerberg-diversity-housing-practices-10-23-19
https://www.newyorker.com/tech/annals-of-technology/the-problem-of-political-advertising-on-social-media
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/11/02/opinion/facebook-zuckerberg-political-ads.html
https://edri.org/hate-speech-online-lessons-for-protecting-free-expression/

Browser Fingerprinting Trumps Privacy Choices
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article at the Washington Post, Geoffrey A. Fowler explains browser fingerprinting, an increasingly-used form of online tracking that is difficult for internet users to avoid, even if they use a VPN or turn on private browsing mode. Sites even exploit the choice to turn on "Do Not Track" to uniquely identify visitors. Fowler identifies 183 popular sites that use fingerprinting, and asks 30 to explain why.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/technology/2019/10/31/think-youre-anonymous-online-third-popular-websites-are-fingerprinting-you/

Child Abuse Victims Suffer as Their Images Continue to Circulate
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article at the New York Times, Michael H. Keller and Gabriel J.X. Dance discuss the case of two sisters who are haunted by the photos and videos of their childhood abuse, which their father posted online ten years ago and which have been found in over 130 child sexual abuse investigations this year alone. Despite the decade-old existence of PhotoDNA, which fingerprints and identifies abuse images, the response from technology companies remains inconsistent, largely unilateral, reactive, and secretive.
https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2019/11/09/us/internet-child-sex-abuse.html

The Loss of the "Good Internet"
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article at The Week, Phillip Maciak laments the death of the "good internet", the 2000s era of blogs, new media, and message boards that gave a generation of good, thoughtful writers a chance to start their careers with fresh approaches. Maciak now begins his class on cultural criticism in the digital age with a week of obituaries for sites like Grantland, Gawker, The Awl, and Television without Pity. A Washington Post editorial notes that for the ninth year in a row Freedom House's annual report finds that internet freedom is decreasing worldwide as mass surveillance and government media manipulation continue to rise.
https://theweek.com/articles/875251/good-internet-history
https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/the-internet-gets-less-free--for-the-ninth-year-in-a-row/2019/11/05/ffe3fca0-ff48-11e9-8bab-0fc209e065a8_story.html


***

DIARY
==============
If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

IGF Global
----------------------------------------
November 25-29, 2019
Berlin, Germany
The Internet Governance Forum (IGF) was set up in 2006 as an open discussion platform of the United Nations for key legal, political, social and technical issues relating to the internet. IGF's multi-stakeholder model aims to ensure that all relevant societal groups are equally involved in preparations and implementation: governments, civil society, business, academia, international organizations, and the technical community. This is particularly of note in terms of representatives from developing and newly industrializing countries, which otherwise tend to be under-represented.
https://www.igf2019.berlin/

Munin Conference on Scholarly Publishing
----------------------------------------
November 27-29, 2019
Tromsø, Norway
The Munin Conference is an annual conference on scholarly publishing and communication, primarily revolving around open access, open data and open science.
http://site.uit.no/muninconf/

CPDP 2020
----------------------------------------
January 22-24, 2020
Brussels, Belgium
The 2020 edition of Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection has issued a call for panels in all areas related to technological privacy and data protection.
https://www.cpdpconferences.org/call-for-panels

FAT* 2020
----------------------------------------
January 27-30, 2020
Barcelona, Spain
ACM FAT* is an annual conference dedicated to bringing together a diverse community to investigate and tackle issues in this emerging area. Topics of interest include the theory and practice of fair machine learning, measurement and auditing of deployed systems, users' experience of algorithms, and the ethical, moral, social, and policy implications of big data and ubiquitous intelligent systems.
https://fatconference.org/

Meeting of the Minds Annual Summit
----------------------------------------
February 19-21, 2020
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Attending the Meeting of the Minds Annual Summit is an opportunity for anyone seeking cross-disciplinary strategies and partnerships that deliver scalable, transferable, and equitable solutions to urban neighborhoods.
https://meetingoftheminds.org/events/motm2020

AI@Work
----------------------------------------
March 5-6, 2020
Amsterdam, Netherlands
From automating simple tasks to predicting efficiencies, AI has much to offer business. Yet we have also been warned: AI will reinforce biases, hide important decisions, and deplete employment. Are we headed to a smarter workplace, or a dumber future? AI@Work will go beyond siloed debate: computer scientists, ethicists, academics, policy makers, and business leaders will come together to share ambitions, experiences, concerns, and visions.
https://ai.reshapingwork.net/

TICTeC 2020
----------------------------------------
March 24-25, 2020
Reykjavik, Iceland
mySociety created TICTeC to bridge the gap between civic tech and research - to bring two different communities together, to emphasize the importance of being able to demonstrate impact, and to share what those impacts are. Because Reykjavik's city Council has pioneered using digital tools to elicit feedback from citizens on council policies, expenditures, and projects, the 2020 conference will provide a special opportunity to learn from Iceland's extensive civic technology and civic engagement experience.
https://www.mysociety.org/2019/09/20/join-us-in-reykjavik-for-tictec-2020/

We Robot 2020
----------------------------------------
April 2-4, 2020
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
We Robot is an interdisciplinary conference on the legal and policy questions relating to robots. The increasing sophistication of robots and their widespread deployment everywhere - from the home, to hospitals, to public spaces, and even to the battlefield - disrupts existing legal regimes and requires new thinking on policy issues. The conference fosters conversations between the people designing, building, and deploying robots, and those who design or influence the legal and social structures in which robots will operate.
https://techlaw.uottawa.ca/werobot

Global Privacy Summit
----------------------------------------
April 7-8, 2020
Washington, DC, USA
Global Privacy Summit will gather more than 3,600 professionals from around the world for an outstanding program with a truly global focus.
https://10times.com/global-privacy-summit

AI for Good
----------------------------------------
May 4-8, 2020
Geneva, Switzerland
The AI for Good Global Summit is the leading United Nations platform for global and inclusive dialogue on AI. The Summit is hosted each year in Geneva by the International Telecommunications Union in partnership with sibling UN agencies, the XPRIZE Foundation, and ACM.
https://aiforgood.itu.int/

re:publica 2020
----------------------------------------
May 6-8, 2020
Berlin, Germany
re:publica is Europe's largest internet and digital society conference. More than 19 500 participants from 80 countries came together to discuss current issues of digital society at the three-day festival. Participants represent a cross-section of (digital) society, which include professionals from economics, politics, business, hacker culture, NGOs, media, and marketing, as well as bloggers, activists, artists, and social media experts.
https://re-publica.com/en

Creative Commons Global Summit
----------------------------------------
May 14-16, 2020
Lisbon, Portugal
The 2019 CC Summit gathered nearly 400 Creative Commoners from across the globe to attend over 130 sessions and seven keynotes. The Summit, comprising discussion, debate, workshops and planning, talks, and community building, is for anyone who's interested in the global movement for the commons as an activist, advocate, artist, librarian, educator, lawyer, or technologist.
https://creativecommons.org/2019/08/28/cc-global-summit-lisbon-may-14-16/

Privacy Law Scholars
----------------------------------------
June 4-5, 2020
Washington, DC, USA
Organized jointly by BCLT and the George Washington University Law School, the Privacy Law Scholars Conference (PLSC) assembles a wide array of privacy law scholars and practitioners from around the world to discuss current issues and foster greater connections between academia and practice. PLSC brings together privacy law scholars, privacy scholars from other disciplines (economics, philosophy, political science, computer science), and practitioners (industry, legal, advocacy, and government).
https://www.law.berkeley.edu/research/bclt/bcltevents/2020-privacy-law-scholars-conference/

Festival of AI and Emerging Technology
----------------------------------------
June 8-10, 2020
London, UK
CogX draws together speakers from industry, government, and academia to create "a space to learn, discover, and connect with the people and technologies that are shaping the future of humanity".
https://cogx.co/

RightsCon
----------------------------------------
June 9-12, 2020
San José, Costa Rica
Each year, RightsCon, organized by AccessNow, gathers over 1,000 expert speakers from around the world.
https://www.rightscon.org/

Aspen Ideas Festival
----------------------------------------
June 27-July 3, 2020
Aspen  Colorado
Presented by the Aspen Institute in partnership with The Atlantic, the Aspen Ideas Festival is a public gathering place for leaders from around the globe and across many disciplines to present and discuss the ideas and issues that both shape our lives and challenge our times. Anyone may purchase a pass to attend.
https://www.aspenideas.org/pages/register

WEIS 2020
----------------------------------------
June, 2020 (TBD)
Brussels, Belgium
The annual Workshop on the Economics of Information Security crosses the disciplines of economics, behavioural science, and computer security.
https://weis2020.econinfosec.org/

FTC PrivacyCon
----------------------------------------
July 21, 2020
Washington, DC
The US Federal Trade Commission's fifth annual PrivacyCon, which is free and open to the public, will focus in particular on the privacy of health data collected, stored, and transmitted by mobile apps.
https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/events-calendar/privacycon-2020

Wikimania
----------------------------------------
August 2020
Bangkok, Thailand
Wikimania 2020 will be the 16th Wikimania conference, an annual event for the international Wikimedia community.
https://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/Wikimania_2020

DEF CON 28
----------------------------------------
August 6-9, 2020
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
DEF CON is one of the oldest and largest continuously running hacker conventions.
https://defcon.org/index.html

Netroots Nation
----------------------------------------
August 13-15, 2020
Denver, Colorado, USA
For more than a decade, Netroots Nation, which began as a convention for the most active members of the DailyKos community, has hosted the largest annual conference for progressives and other organizers and advocacy groups, drawing thousands of attendees from around the country and beyond, to develop their work around topics such as sharing data, developing technology talent, and managing digital campaigns.
https://www.netrootsnation.org/

86th World Library and Information Congress
----------------------------------------
August 15-21, 2020
Dublin, Ireland
WLIC is the annual conference of the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA).
https://2020.ifla.org/


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News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week ending October 25, 2019

====================================================
The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published on the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF.  Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

Current and former grantees featured in this issue: EFF, Oxford Internet Institute, Ranking Digital Rights.


NEWS
=====

UN Special Rapporteur warns of "digital welfare dystopia"
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The UN Special Rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights, Philip Alston, warns that the world must act quickly to "avoid stumbling, zombie-like, into a digital welfare dystopia", the United Nations Commission on Human Rights reports. Too often, the altruistic claims made for digitizing government benefits services mask the real intention of slashing welfare benefits, installing surveillance, and generating profits for private companies. One of Alston's examples is the Netherlands, whose System Risk Indication system allows central and local government authorities to feed broad categories of previously siloed data about claimants into an undisclosed model to score the likelihood that they will commit benefit fraud. To date, it has been used exclusively in areas with a high proportion of low-income residents, migrants, and ethnic minorities.
https://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=25156&LangID=E
https://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=25152&LangID=E

Automated Systems Place Poor People at Increased Risk
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Campaigners in India are finding that benefit support is being withdrawn from the country's most vulnerable citizens whenever there is a glitch - such as an unrecognized thumbprint or a failure to link to the Aadhaar numbering system - leaving them to die of starvation, Rebecca Ratcliffe reports at the Guardian. The story is part of the "Automating Poverty" project, which explores the consequences of increased computerization and algorithmic scoring in government services across the world. In Bristol, UK, an algorithm tries to assess the likely futures of 11 and 12-year-olds based on comparisons to current adults when they were the same age.
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2019/oct/16/glitch-india-biometric-welfare-system-starvation
https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2019/oct/15/bristol-algorithm-assess-citizens-risk-harm-guide-frontline-staff
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/series/automating-poverty
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2019/oct/14/automating-poverty-algorithms-punish-poor

Human Rights Index Adds Indicators for Transparency in Advertising
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Ranking Digital Rights has published draft indicators for transparency and accountability in targeted advertising policies and practices and algorithmic decision making for inclusion in its index, which assesses corporate threats to rights to privacy and freedom of expression, Nathalie Maréchal reports at the RDR's blog. RDR will follow up with a pilot study and welcomes feedback. RDR is also advertising for consultants to undertake a scoping study to inform funding proposals for its new German affiliate.
https://rankingdigitalrights.org/2019/10/18/newindicators/
https://rankingdigitalrights.org/srdrn/rfp-scoping-study/

Hate Speech Detection Systems Display Racial Bias
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article at TechCrunch, Devin Coldeway summarizes a research paper that finds widespread racial bias in the training datasets used to develop hate speech detection systems such as Google's Jigsaw algorithm, which flags black American slang as "toxic". In a blog posting at 20 Minutes Into the Future, Daniel Harvey highlights the pattern of using contractors to give technology companies plausible deniability for unsavory practices. His example: to improve the face unlock feature of its Pixel 4, Google increased the diversity of its facial recognition training dataset by sending contractors to US cities and offered $5 certificates in return for scanning faces. In Atlanta, contractors targeted homeless people and low-income students, often without explaining the purpose of the scans or that they worked for Google.
https://techcrunch.com/2019/08/14/racial-bias-observed-in-hate-speech-detection-algorithm-from-google/
https://www.scribd.com/document/421898931/The-Risk-of-Racial-Bias-in-Hate-Speech-Detection
https://20minutesintothefuture.substack.com/p/google-vs-black-people-scandal-in
https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2019/10/google-allegedly-used-homeless-train-pixel-phone/599668/

Russian Hacking Group Masquerades as Iranian Cyber-Espionage
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The Russian "Turla" hacking group has exploited an Iranian cyber-espionage operation to conduct attacks on government and industry organizations in dozens of countries, primarily in the Middle East but including Britain, Al-Jazeera reports. The practice, known as "fourth party collection", has also been used by US and its Western allies, according to documents released by Edward Snowden. Danny Palmer reports at ZDNet that researchers have found that the sophisticated Russian "Cozy Bear" hacking group, also known as "APT29", which was one of the groups that hacked the Democratic National Committee in the run-up to the 2016 US presidential election, has not, as previously thought, ceased operations but has used four new families of malware to target ministries of foreign affairs in at least three European countries, as well as the US embassy of an EU country in Washington, DC. Both Turla and Cozy Bear are thought to be associated with the Russian intelligence service. At Wired, Andy Greenberg recounts the history of Russian hackers' false flags.
https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2019/10/hacking-hackers-russian-group-hijacked-iran-spy-operation-191021041816789.html
https://www.zdnet.com/article/cybersecurity-warning-this-sophisticated-russian-hacking-group-is-back-in-action-again/
https://www.wired.com/story/russian-hackers-false-flags-iran-fancy-bear/

FBI Traces Child Sexual Exploiters via Bitcoin Payments
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The US Department of Justice rescued 23 children in abusive situations in the US, Spain, and the UK, arrested 330 people, and seized 8TB of child sexual exploitation videos by tracing $370,000 in bitcoin payments to the Welcome to Video child sexual exploitation site that it closed down in 2018, Merrit Kennedy reports at NPR. The site was hidden on the Tor network, and, prosecutors said, was one of the first of its kind to monetize child exploitation videos by using bitcoin.
https://www.npr.org/2019/10/16/770628069/one-of-the-worst-forms-of-evil-more-than-330-arrested-in-child-porn-site-bust


FEATURES AND ANALYSIS
====================

Open Access Continues Growth
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting summarizing a new study of open access by Heather Piwowar, Jason Priem, and Richard Orr, Our Research finds that green (especially when made available within a year of publication), gold, and hybrid papers receive more views than their closed or bronze counterparts. In 2019, OA articles received 52% of article views, even though only 31% of articles are available as OA. The researchers estimate that by 2025 those numbers will be 70% and 44%.
https://blog.ourresearch.org/future-of-oa/

The Many Ways in Which AI Contributes to Climate Change
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this posting at Medium, Roel Dobbe and Meredith Whittaker from the AI Now Institute explore the connections between AI and climate change. The technology sector is expected to contribute 3-3.6% of global greenhouse emissions by 2020, roughly equivalent to aviation and larger than the world's fifth biggest polluting country, Japan. Little of these energy demands are filled by renewables; in 2018 OpenAI reported that the amount of computation used in the largest AI training runs has been doubling every 3.5 months. In addition, companies like Google, Microsoft, and Google are all pitching AI services to fossil fuel companies to help optimize and accelerate fossil fuel production and extraction.
https://medium.com/@AINowInstitute/ai-and-climate-change-how-theyre-connected-and-what-we-can-do-about-it-6aa8d0f5b32c

US House Committee Considers How to Build a Healthier Internet
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this recorded livestream, the US House Committee on Energy & Commerce holds a hearing on fostering a healthier internet to protect consumers, with testimony from Reddit co-founder and CEO Steve Huffman, recent MacArthur award winner and anti-revenge pornography campaigner Danielle Citron, EFF legal director Corynne McSherry, UC Berkeley's Henry Farid, Google's head of intellectual property policy, Katherine Oyama, and Gretchen S. Peters, the executive director for the Alliance to Counter Crime Online. Among the topics discussed are deepfakes, revenge porn, and the difficulties of content moderation.
https://energycommerce.house.gov/committee-activity/hearings/hearing-on-fostering-a-healthier-internet-to-protect-consumers

School Surveillance Rises in US and UK
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this Guardian article, Lois Beckett examines the rampant growth of school surveillance in the US, where its adoption is being fueled by free offers and the fear of school shootings, and in the UK, where it's being billed as "de-radicalization". A spokesperson for Gaggle, which supplies one of the US systems, argues that school surveillance prepares children for their adult lives of workplace monitoring. At Wired, Tom Simonite examines the growing use of AI-enhanced facial recognition in schools.
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/oct/22/school-student-surveillance-bark-gaggle
https://www.wired.com/story/delicate-ethics-facial-recognition-schools/

Women Form Primary Deepfakes Target
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting, Giorgio Patrini discusses Deeptrace's work researching the evolving capabilities of and threats posed by deepfakes and synthetic media. The lab's latest work finds that the number of deepfake videos has doubled over the last seven months to 14,678, 96% of them non-consensual deepfake pornography that has attracted 134 million views on the top four websites offering videos targeting female celebrities worldwide. This growth is supported by the increasing commodification of tools and services that enable non-experts to create them, particularly in China and South Korea.
https://deeptracelabs.com/mapping-the-deepfake-landscape/

Tackling Misinformation Requires Collective Action
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this report from the Oxford Internet Institute, Phil Howard and Lisa-Maria Neudert make four recommendations for tackling the spread of misinformation: governments should verify campaigners and track expenditure, political parties should be more transparent about data sources, social media platforms should create open archives of ads and report on moderation and takedowns, and civil society should act as external auditors. At openDemocracy, Peter Osborne finds that the UK media from the Daily Mail to the BBC are failing to challenge claims made by prime minister Boris Johnson regarding Brexit or to report corrections when they have been proved untrue. Finally, in a WhatsApp-funded study of WhatsApp lynchings in India find that mainstream media act as an accelerant that gives misinformation added credibility, and ideology and prejudice are bigger factors than ignorance or digital illiteracy.
https://www.oii.ox.ac.uk/news/releases/collective-action-needed-now-to-tackle-spread-of-disinformation-in-public-life-finds-new-report/
https://comprop.oii.ox.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/sites/93/2019/09/CyberTroop-Report19.pdf
https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/opendemocracyuk/british-journalists-have-become-part-of-johnsons-fake-news-machine/
https://www.huffingtonpost.in/entry/whatsapp-lynching-fake-news-misinformation-study_in_5da89bc9e4b0b5c9be4b067b


***

DIARY
==============
If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

Biometrics Congress
----------------------------------------
October 28-30, 2019
London, UK
The Biometrics Institute Congress provides an independent platform where the international biometrics community can gather to conduct off-the-record discussion among the institute's multi-stakeholder community. In 2018, representatives from over 30 nations attended. This year's theme is making the world a safer place through the responsible and ethical use of biometrics in an era where laws and regulations are often unable to stay abreast of technology change and the business models based on it.
https://www.biometricsinstitute.org/event/biometrics-congress-2019/

Web Summit
----------------------------------------
November 4-7. 2019
Lisbon, Portugal
The Web Summit gathers the founders and CEOs of technology companies, fast-growing startups, policymakers, and heads of state to ask a simple question: where to next? In 2018, speakers included Margrethe Vestager, Tim Berners-Lee, and Microsoft CEO Brad Smith.
https://websummit.com/

18th Workshop on Privacy in the Electronic Society
----------------------------------------
November 11, 2019
London, UK
The goal of this workshop, held in conjunction with the ACM CCS conference, is to discuss and find solutions to the privacy problems that result from the transformation of society brought by the Information Revolution. One of the major implications of this technological shift has been a massive increase in the collection, sharing, and analysis of personal data. The workshop will include academia, government, and industry, as well as communities such as law and business, who will present novel research on all theoretical and practical aspects of electronic privacy, as well as experimental studies of fielded systems.
http://wpes.tech/

Tech Giants, Monopoly Power, and Public Discourse
----------------------------------------
November 14-15, 2019
New York, NY, USA
At this symposium, convened by the Knight First Amendment Institute, leading legal scholars, economists, and technologists will examine the extent and nature of the technology giants' ability to structure, shape, and distort public discourse, and consider whether anti-monopoly tools might usefully be deployed to limit, expose, or counter this power. Speakers include Ellen P. Goodman, Lina Khan, Tim Wu, and Ethan Zuckerman.
https://knightcolumbia.org/content/the-tech-giants-monopoly-power-and-public-discourse

IGF Global
----------------------------------------
November 25-29, 2019
Berlin, Germany
The Internet Governance Forum (IGF) was set up in 2006 as an open discussion platform of the United Nations for key legal, political, social and technical issues relating to the internet. IGF's multi-stakeholder model aims to ensure that all relevant societal groups are equally involved in preparations and implementation: governments, civil society, business, academia, international organizations, and the technical community. This is particularly of note in terms of representatives from developing and newly industrializing countries, which otherwise tend to be under-represented.
https://www.igf2019.berlin/

Munin Conference on Scholarly Publishing
----------------------------------------
November 27-29, 2019
Tromsø, Norway
The Munin Conference is an annual conference on scholarly publishing and communication, primarily revolving around open access, open data and open science.
http://site.uit.no/muninconf/

CPDP 2020
----------------------------------------
January 22-24, 2020
Brussels, Belgium
The 2020 edition of Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection has issued a call for panels in all areas related to technological privacy and data protection.
https://www.cpdpconferences.org/call-for-panels

FAT* 2020
----------------------------------------
January 27-30, 2020
Barcelona, Spain
ACM FAT* is an annual conference dedicated to bringing together a diverse community to investigate and tackle issues in this emerging area. Topics of interest include the theory and practice of fair machine learning, measurement and auditing of deployed systems, users' experience of algorithms, and the ethical, moral, social, and policy implications of big data and ubiquitous intelligent systems.
https://fatconference.org/

Meeting of the Minds Annual Summit
----------------------------------------
February 19-21, 2020
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Attending the Meeting of the Minds Annual Summit is an opportunity for anyone seeking cross-disciplinary strategies and partnerships that deliver scalable, transferable, and equitable solutions to urban neighborhoods.
https://meetingoftheminds.org/events/motm2020

TICTeC 2020
----------------------------------------
March 24-25, 2020
Reykjavik, Iceland
mySociety created TICTeC to bridge the gap between civic tech and research - to bring two different communities together, to emphasize the importance of being able to demonstrate impact, and to share what those impacts are. Because Reykjavik's city Council has pioneered using digital tools to elicit feedback from citizens on council policies, expenditures, and projects, the 2020 conference will provide a special opportunity to learn from Iceland's extensive civic technology and civic engagement experience.
https://www.mysociety.org/2019/09/20/join-us-in-reykjavik-for-tictec-2020/

We Robot 2020
----------------------------------------
April 2-4, 2020
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
We Robot is an interdisciplinary conference on the legal and policy questions relating to robots. The increasing sophistication of robots and their widespread deployment everywhere - from the home, to hospitals, to public spaces, and even to the battlefield - disrupts existing legal regimes and requires new thinking on policy issues. The conference fosters conversations between the people designing, building, and deploying robots, and those who design or influence the legal and social structures in which robots will operate.
https://techlaw.uottawa.ca/werobot

Global Privacy Summit
----------------------------------------
April 7-8, 2020
Washington, DC, USA
Global Privacy Summit will gather more than 3,600 professionals from around the world for an outstanding program with a truly global focus.
https://10times.com/global-privacy-summit

AI for Good
----------------------------------------
May 4-8, 2020
Geneva, Switzerland
The AI for Good Global Summit is the leading United Nations platform for global and inclusive dialogue on AI. The Summit is hosted each year in Geneva by the International Telecommunications Union in partnership with sibling UN agencies, the XPRIZE Foundation, and ACM.
https://aiforgood.itu.int/

re:publica 2020
----------------------------------------
May 6-8, 2020
Berlin, Germany
re:publica is Europe's largest internet and digital society conference. More than 19 500 participants from 80 countries came together to discuss current issues of digital society at the three-day festival. Participants represent a cross-section of (digital) society, which include professionals from economics, politics, business, hacker culture, NGOs, media, and marketing, as well as bloggers, activists, artists, and social media experts.
https://re-publica.com/en

Creative Commons Global Summit
----------------------------------------
May 14-16, 2020
Lisbon, Portugal
The 2019 CC Summit gathered nearly 400 Creative Commoners from across the globe to attend over 130 sessions and seven keynotes. The Summit, comprising discussion, debate, workshops and planning, talks, and community building, is for anyone who's interested in the global movement for the commons as an activist, advocate, artist, librarian, educator, lawyer, or technologist.
https://creativecommons.org/2019/08/28/cc-global-summit-lisbon-may-14-16/

Privacy Law Scholars
----------------------------------------
June 4-5, 2020
Washington, DC, USA
Organized jointly by BCLT and the George Washington University Law School, the Privacy Law Scholars Conference (PLSC) assembles a wide array of privacy law scholars and practitioners from around the world to discuss current issues and foster greater connections between academia and practice. PLSC brings together privacy law scholars, privacy scholars from other disciplines (economics, philosophy, political science, computer science), and practitioners (industry, legal, advocacy, and government).
https://www.law.berkeley.edu/research/bclt/bcltevents/2020-privacy-law-scholars-conference/

Festival of AI and Emerging Technology
----------------------------------------
June 8-10, 2020
London, UK
CogX draws together speakers from industry, government, and academia to create "a space to learn, discover, and connect with the people and technologies that are shaping the future of humanity".
https://cogx.co/

RightsCon
----------------------------------------
June 9-12, 2020
San José, Costa Rica
Each year, RightsCon, organized by AccessNow, gathers over 1,000 expert speakers from around the world.
https://www.rightscon.org/

Aspen Ideas Festival
----------------------------------------
June 27-July 3, 2020
Aspen  Colorado
Presented by the Aspen Institute in partnership with The Atlantic, the Aspen Ideas Festival is a public gathering place for leaders from around the globe and across many disciplines to present and discuss the ideas and issues that both shape our lives and challenge our times. Anyone may purchase a pass to attend.
https://www.aspenideas.org/pages/register

WEIS 2020
----------------------------------------
June, 2020 (TBD)
Brussels, Belgium
The annual Workshop on the Economics of Information Security crosses the disciplines of economics, behavioural science, and computer security.
https://weis2020.econinfosec.org/

DEF CON 28
----------------------------------------
August 6-9, 2020
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
DEF CON is one of the oldest and largest continuously running hacker conventions.
https://defcon.org/index.html

FTC PrivacyCon
----------------------------------------
July 21, 2020
Washington, DC
The US Federal Trade Commission's fifth annual PrivacyCon, which is free and open to the public, will focus in particular on the privacy of health data collected, stored, and transmitted by mobile apps.
https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/events-calendar/privacycon-2020

Wikimania
----------------------------------------
August 2020
Bangkok, Thailand
Wikimania 2020 will be the 16th Wikimania conference, an annual event for the international Wikimedia community.
https://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/Wikimania_2020

86th World Library and Information Congress
----------------------------------------
August 15-21, 2020
Dublin, Ireland
WLIC is the annual conference of the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA).
https://2020.ifla.org/


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Our mailing address is:
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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/
News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week ending October 11, 2019

====================================================
The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published on the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF.  Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

Current and former grantees featured in this issue: EDRi, EFF, Oxford Internet Institute.


NEWS
=====

UK and US sign mutual law enforcement data access agreement
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The US attorney general, William Barr, and UK's Home Secretary, Priti Patel, have signed an agreement to allow law enforcement agencies to demand access to certain data directly from the other country's technology companies, bypassing the lengthy and cumbersome inter-government Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty process, Julia Carrie Wong reports at the Guardian. At EFF, Katitza Rodriguez and Camille Fischer argue that the deal will "trample" cross-border privacy safeguards by enabling the countries to bypass each other's legal regime, and note that the enabling legislation is, in the US, the CLOUD Act, and, in the UK, the Investigatory Powers Act and the 2019 Crime (Overseas Production Orders) Act, all of which EFF opposed. Wong also reports that the US, UK, and Australia will pressure Facebook to create a backdoor in its encrypted messaging apps to allow governments direct access to the content of communications.
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2019/oct/03/facebook-surveillance-us-uk-australia-backdoor-encryption
https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2019/10/race-bottom-privacy-protection-us-uk-deal-would-trample-cross-border-privacy

Russia begins installing isolationist internet option
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Alexander Zharov, the head of Russia's federal communications regulator, Roskomnadzor, has confirmed to the press that under the Russian Internet Law (RuNet) president Vladimir Putin signed into law earlier in 2019 equipment is being installed on the networks of the country's major telecom operators that will operate an alternative domain name system and steer traffic away from non-Russian servers, Zak Doffman reports at Forbes. "Combat" testing is expected to begin during the month of October. The "RuNet" network is supposed to be deployed only in cases where the system's integrity, stability, or security is "in danger".
https://www.forbes.com/sites/zakdoffman/2019/09/24/russia-begins-installing-equipment-to-cut-its-access-to-world-wide-web/#639083136574

UK: Police build secret database to combat radicalization
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The UK's counter-terrorism police have been secretly sharing details of thousands of individuals referred to the government's anti-radicalization Prevent program via the National Police Prevent Case Management database, which is accessible to all police forces in all parts of the UK as well as the Home Office, Jamie Grierson reports at the Guardian. Prevent was intended to be a voluntary program that diverted people from terrorism before they commit a crime; individuals are not informed when they are added to the database. In 2017-2018, 7,318 people were referred to Prevent by public servants such as teachers, police, or doctors; 57% were age 20 or younger, and 2009 were under 16. Only 394 were deemed to need specialist support. Also at the Guardian, Nosheen Iqbal reports that the Prevent program, the Home Office, and the Office for Security and Counter-Terrorism have spent more than £9 million to quietly fund groups that run online platforms, workshops, and events aimed at young Muslims.
https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2019/oct/06/counter-terror-police-are-running-secret-prevent-database
https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2019/sep/15/lifestyle-website-for-muslim-teens-is-covertly-funded-by-the-home-office

France: Google declines to pay publishers to link to news stories
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Rather than pay licensing fees to French news organizations, Google will remove the previews accompanying links to news stories unless publishers actively request their inclusion, Timothy B. Lee reports at Ars Technica. In passing its transposition of the copyright directive enacted by the EU earlier this year, France hoped that Google would pay licensing fees. Instead, Google's move is expected to reduce traffic to news sites, exactly as happened when similar legislation was tried in Spain. Google notes that it derives no revenues from linking to news stories. At Politico, Laura Kayali reports that some press publishers have estimated that Facebook's and Google's market power in online advertising costs their sector €250-320 million per year.
https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2019/09/despite-new-law-google-refuses-to-pay-to-link-to-french-news-sites/
https://www.politico.eu/article/licensing-agreements-with-press-publishers-france-google/

China: Applicants for mobile phone numbers must pass facial recognition check
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The Chinese Ministry of Industry and Information Technology has announced that from December 1 signing up for mobile and data services will require a facial recognition identification test, Jane Li reports at Quartz. MIIT says the requirement, an expansion of the real name registration system China launched in 2013, is part of its efforts to control fraud and safeguard citizens in cyberspace; citizens will also not be allowed to pass their numbers on to others.
https://qz.com/1720832/china-introduces-facial-recognition-step-to-get-new-mobile-number/

Singapore: "Fake news" law comes into effect
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The new Singaporean Protection from Online Falsehoods and Manipulation Bill came into force on October 2, James Griffiths reports at CNN. Individuals may face fines of up to SGD50,000 ($36,000) or up to five years in prison, with those sanctions doubling if the alleged falsehood is posted using a fake or bot-controlled account. Companies may be fined up to SGD1 million ($735,000). Government ministers can decide whether to order takedown or an annotated correction, though they must explain why the alleged misinformation is false. Human Rights Watch Asia expects the law to be abused for political purposes. Other countries that have introduced or are considering similar legislation include Australia, the UK, and Fiji.
https://edition.cnn.com/2019/10/02/asia/singapore-fake-news-internet-censorship-intl-hnk/index.html


FEATURES AND ANALYSIS
====================

Wikipedia edit war erupts over Taiwan coverage
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article at the BBC, Demos researcher Carl Miller, author of The Death of the Gods, finds that Wikipedia's coverage of Taiwan has become the forum for an edit war comprising 1,600 edits across 22 politically sensitive entries. Chinese officials and academics, Miller writes, are pursuing a campaign to systematically correct what they believe to be Wikipedia's anti-Chinese biases. The campaign is extending to personal attacks on Wikipedia editors.
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-49921173

Faculty value for outreach not reflected in promotion criteria
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting, Erin C. McKiernan, Juan Pablo Alperin, and Lesley A. Schimanski discuss their three years of research to find ways to reform academic review, promotion, and tenure (RPT), as many faculty cite concerns about these types of evaluations as important factors limiting their adoption of open access, open data, and open scholarship practices. Their work finds a mismatch between the language in RPT policy documents and what faculty actually value, such as readership and reach. This research was supported by the Open Society Foundations.
https://sfdora.org/2019/09/30/opportunities-for-review-promotion-and-tenure-reform/

Manipulation of public opinion is a global problem
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this press release, Philip Howard and Samantha Bradshaw of the Oxford Internet Institute summarize their new report taking inventory of the use of algorithms, automation, and big data to shape public life and find that manipulation of public opinion is a global problem that has spread to 70 countries, 45 of them democracies. Seven countries - China, India, Pakistan, Russia, Saudi Arabia, and Venezuela - are the source of foreign influence operations, while 25 countries work with private companies or communications firms that offer "computational propaganda" as a service. Facebook remains the platform of choice for social media manipulation. At Buzzfeed News, Jeremy Singer-Vine and Kevin Collier find that 1.3 million comments to the US Federal Communications Commission website opposing network neutrality in 2017 were fakes posted by political operatives.
https://www.oii.ox.ac.uk/news/releases/use-of-social-media-to-manipulate-public-opinion-now-a-global-problem-says-new-report/
https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/jsvine/net-neutrality-fcc-fake-comments-impersonation

CJEU ruling opens door for upload filters
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting, Eleonora Rosati discusses the October 3 ruling from the Court of Justice of the European Union that holds that an intermediary such as Facebook can be ordered to remove, worldwide, content that is identical and equivalent to content that has been found illegal. The case originated in Austria in 2018, when the politician Eva Glawischnig-Piesczek sought an injunction to force Facebook to remove disparaging statements made about her in a user's public comment. EDRi argues that the ruling opens the door for "upload filters" on all online content, damaging freedom of expression. In a blog posting, the legal firm Hunton Andrews Kurth analyzes the CJEU's decision in late September in Google v. CNIL that a country can require that platforms apply the right to dereferencing (the "right to be forgotten") worldwide, but should take into account a number of factors regarding the person, the offense, and the public interest.
https://ipkitten.blogspot.com/2019/10/breaking-cjeu-rules-that-intermediary.html
https://edri.org/cjeu-ruling-could-open-the-door-for-upload-filters/
https://www.huntonprivacyblog.com/2019/09/26/cjeu-rules-right-to-be-forgotten-on-google-limited-to-the-eu-in-landmark-case/

New software license seeks to give developers control
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article at Wired, Klint Finley discusses Coraline Ada Ehmke's proposed new "Hippocratic license", intended to give open source developers a way of exerting control over how their software is used. Tying the "do no harm" license to existing international human rights standards, she hopes, will reduce the uncertainty inherent in defining "harm". The license still needs to pass a legal review and there are compatibility issues to be solved.
https://www.wired.com/story/open-source-license-requires-users-do-no-harm/

TikTok becomes vector for Chinese foreign policy
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this Guardian article, Alex Hern finds from leaked documents detailing the moderation guidelines for the video-sharing app TikTok that the app's owner, ByteDance, is using it to advance Chinese foreign policy aims abroad. Among the types of content that are either deleted or marked so only the original poster can see them are criticisms of China's socialist system, controversial topics such as separatism, protests such as Tiananmen Square, and 20 "foreign leaders or sensitive figures". ByteDance says the version the Guardian saw was retired in May and that the current guidelines do not reference specific countries or issues. At FFWD, Chris Stokel-Walker expands on the story to discuss how foreign governments should respond.
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2019/sep/25/revealed-how-tiktok-censors-videos-that-do-not-please-beijing
https://ffwd.medium.com/taiwan-is-restricting-chinese-video-apps-like-tiktok-for-fear-of-disinformation-cc0a46f62af0


***

DIARY
==============
If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

MozFest
----------------------------------------
October 21-27, 2019
London, UK
MozFest 2019 is the tenth anniversary gathering of educators, activists, technologists, researchers, artists, and young people dedicated to creating a better, healthier internet. This year's theme is "Healthy AI".
https://www.mozillafestival.org/en/

Biometrics Congress
----------------------------------------
October 28-30, 2019
London, UK
The Biometrics Institute Congress provides an independent platform where the international biometrics community can gather to conduct off-the-record discussion among the institute's multi-stakeholder community. In 2018, representatives from over 30 nations attended. This year's theme is making the world a safer place through the responsible and ethical use of biometrics in an era where laws and regulations are often unable to stay abreast of technology change and the business models based on it.
https://www.biometricsinstitute.org/event/biometrics-congress-2019/

Web Summit
----------------------------------------
November 4-7. 2019
Lisbon, Portugal
The Web Summit gathers the founders and CEOs of technology companies, fast-growing startups, policymakers, and heads of state to ask a simple question: where to next? In 2018, speakers included Margrethe Vestager, Tim Berners-Lee, and Microsoft CEO Brad Smith.
https://websummit.com/

18th Workshop on Privacy in the Electronic Society
----------------------------------------
November 11, 2019
London, UK
The goal of this workshop, held in conjunction with the ACM CCS conference, is to discuss and find solutions to the privacy problems that result from the transformation of society brought by the Information Revolution. One of the major implications of this technological shift has been a massive increase in the collection, sharing, and analysis of personal data. The workshop will include academia, government, and industry, as well as communities such as law and business, who will present novel research on all theoretical and practical aspects of electronic privacy, as well as experimental studies of fielded systems.
http://wpes.tech/

Tech Giants, Monopoly Power, and Public Discourse
----------------------------------------
November 14-15, 2019
New York, NY, USA
At this symposium, convened by the Knight First Amendment Institute, leading legal scholars, economists, and technologists will examine the extent and nature of the technology giants' ability to structure, shape, and distort public discourse, and consider whether anti-monopoly tools might usefully be deployed to limit, expose, or counter this power. Speakers include Ellen P. Goodman, Lina Khan, Tim Wu, and Ethan Zuckerman.
https://knightcolumbia.org/content/the-tech-giants-monopoly-power-and-public-discourse

IGF Global
----------------------------------------
November 25-29, 2019
Berlin, Germany
The Internet Governance Forum (IGF) was set up in 2006 as an open discussion platform of the United Nations for key legal, political, social and technical issues relating to the internet. IGF's multi-stakeholder model aims to ensure that all relevant societal groups are equally involved in preparations and implementation: governments, civil society, business, academia, international organizations, and the technical community. This is particularly of note in terms of representatives from developing and newly industrializing countries, which otherwise tend to be under-represented.
https://www.igf2019.berlin/

Munin Conference on Scholarly Publishing
----------------------------------------
November 27-29, 2019
Tromsø, Norway
The Munin Conference is an annual conference on scholarly publishing and communication, primarily revolving around open access, open data and open science.
http://site.uit.no/muninconf/

CPDP 2020
----------------------------------------
January 22-24, 2020
Brussels, Belgium
The 2020 edition of Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection has issued a call for panels in all areas related to technological privacy and data protection.
https://www.cpdpconferences.org/call-for-panels

FAT* 2020
----------------------------------------
January 27-30, 2020
Barcelona, Spain
ACM FAT* is an annual conference dedicated to bringing together a diverse community to investigate and tackle issues in this emerging area. Topics of interest include the theory and practice of fair machine learning, measurement and auditing of deployed systems, users' experience of algorithms, and the ethical, moral, social, and policy implications of big data and ubiquitous intelligent systems.
https://fatconference.org/

Meeting of the Minds Annual Summit
----------------------------------------
February 19-21, 2020
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Attending the Meeting of the Minds Annual Summit is an opportunity for anyone seeking cross-disciplinary strategies and partnerships that deliver scalable, transferable, and equitable solutions to urban neighborhoods.
https://meetingoftheminds.org/events/motm2020

TICTeC 2020
----------------------------------------
March 24-25, 2020
Reykjavik, Iceland
mySociety created TICTeC to bridge the gap between civic tech and research - to bring two different communities together, to emphasize the importance of being able to demonstrate impact, and to share what those impacts are. Because Reykjavik's city Council has pioneered using digital tools to elicit feedback from citizens on council policies, expenditures, and projects, the 2020 conference will provide a special opportunity to learn from Iceland's extensive civic technology and civic engagement experience.
https://www.mysociety.org/2019/09/20/join-us-in-reykjavik-for-tictec-2020/

We Robot 2020
----------------------------------------
April 2-4, 2020
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
We Robot is an interdisciplinary conference on the legal and policy questions relating to robots. The increasing sophistication of robots and their widespread deployment everywhere - from the home, to hospitals, to public spaces, and even to the battlefield - disrupts existing legal regimes and requires new thinking on policy issues. The conference fosters conversations between the people designing, building, and deploying robots, and those who design or influence the legal and social structures in which robots will operate.
https://techlaw.uottawa.ca/werobot

Global Privacy Summit
----------------------------------------
April 7-8, 2020
Washington, DC, USA
Global Privacy Summit will gather more than 3,600 professionals from around the world for an outstanding program with a truly global focus.
https://10times.com/global-privacy-summit

re:publica 2020
----------------------------------------
May 6-8, 2020
Berlin, Germany
re:publica is Europe's largest internet and digital society conference. More than 19 500 participants from 80 countries came together to discuss current issues of digital society at the three-day festival. Participants represent a cross-section of (digital) society, which include professionals from economics, politics, business, hacker culture, NGOs, media, and marketing, as well as bloggers, activists, artists, and social media experts.
https://re-publica.com/en

Creative Commons Global Summit
----------------------------------------
May 14-16, 2020
Lisbon, Portugal
The 2019 CC Summit gathered nearly 400 Creative Commoners from across the globe to attend over 130 sessions and seven keynotes. The Summit, comprising discussion, debate, workshops and planning, talks, and community building, is for anyone who's interested in the global movement for the commons as an activist, advocate, artist, librarian, educator, lawyer, or technologist.
https://creativecommons.org/2019/08/28/cc-global-summit-lisbon-may-14-16/

Privacy Law Scholars
----------------------------------------
June 4-5, 2020
Washington, DC, USA
Organized jointly by BCLT and the George Washington University Law School, the Privacy Law Scholars Conference (PLSC) assembles a wide array of privacy law scholars and practitioners from around the world to discuss current issues and foster greater connections between academia and practice. PLSC brings together privacy law scholars, privacy scholars from other disciplines (economics, philosophy, political science, computer science), and practitioners (industry, legal, advocacy, and government).
https://www.law.berkeley.edu/research/bclt/bcltevents/2020-privacy-law-scholars-conference/

Festival of AI and Emerging Technology
----------------------------------------
June 8-10, 2020
London, UK
CogX draws together speakers from industry, government, and academia to create "a space to learn, discover, and connect with the people and technologies that are shaping the future of humanity".
https://cogx.co/

RightsCon
----------------------------------------
June 9-12, 2020
San José, Costa Rica
Each year, RightsCon, organized by AccessNow, gathers over 1,000 expert speakers from around the world.
https://www.rightscon.org/

Aspen Ideas Festival
----------------------------------------
June 27-July 3, 2020
Aspen  Colorado
Presented by the Aspen Institute in partnership with The Atlantic, the Aspen Ideas Festival is a public gathering place for leaders from around the globe and across many disciplines to present and discuss the ideas and issues that both shape our lives and challenge our times. Anyone may purchase a pass to attend.
https://www.aspenideas.org/pages/register

WEIS 2020
----------------------------------------
June, 2020 (TBD)
Brussels, Belgium
The annual Workshop on the Economics of Information Security crosses the disciplines of economics, behavioural science, and computer security.
https://weis2020.econinfosec.org/

DEF CON 28
----------------------------------------
August 6-9, 2020
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
DEF CON is one of the oldest and largest continuously running hacker conventions.
https://defcon.org/index.html

Wikimania
----------------------------------------
August 2020
Bangkok, Thailand
Wikimania 2020 will be the 16th Wikimania conference, an annual event for the international Wikimedia community.
https://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/Wikimania_2020

86th World Library and Information Congress
----------------------------------------
August 15-21, 2020
Dublin, Ireland
WLIC is the annual conference of the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA).
https://2020.ifla.org/


***

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News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week ending September 27, 2019

====================================================
The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published on the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF.  Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

Current and former grantees featured in this issue: Amnesty International, Bits of Freedom, Citizen Lab, EDRi, MIT Media Lab, Privacy International.


NEWS
=====

Fallout from Epstein scandal continues at MIT
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In a contentious September 18 meeting led by president Rafael Reif, MIT faculty debated the institute's acceptance of funding from Jeffrey Epstein, Susan Svriuga reports at the Washington Post. Fifty female faculty members protested MIT's cultural habit of undervaluing women. Held over for later discussion is a proposal to establish a committee to protect academic integrity. On September 12, in a post at Medium MIT, scientist Selam Jie Gano responded to Epstein-related comments sent to a Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) mailing list by angrily calling for the removal of Free Software Foundation founder and MIT visiting professor Richard Stallman. Five days later, Richard Lawler reported at Engadget that Stallman had resigned from both MIT and the Free Software Foundation. At Wired, journalist Virginia Heffernan picks apart the "sausage-fest" intellectual pretensions of the members of Epstein-connected literary agent John Brockman's mostly-male Edge Network, which she joined in 2009 and left in 2016. On September 20, Lisa Song reported at ProPublica that the allegedly non-functional food computer produced by MIT Media Lab's Open Agriculture Initiative is also a polluter that has dumped dangerous levels of nitrogen into local waterways.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/education/2019/09/19/mit-faculty-responds-epstein-scandal-calling-culture-change-greater-accountability/
https://medium.com/@selamie/remove-richard-stallman-fec6ec210794
https://www.engadget.com/2019/09/17/rms-fsf-mit-epstein/
https://www.wired.com/story/an-end-to-pornography-sophistry-and-panty-raids/
https://www.propublica.org/article/mit-media-lab-kept-regulators-in-the-dark-dumped-chemicals-in-excess-of-legal-limit

Digital lending brings debt and data exploitation to Kenya
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The rising uptake of digital lending across Kenya is profiting from pushing tens of thousands of people into debt and leaving them open to data exploitation exploiting their data, Abdi Latif Dahir reports at Quartz. Google has begun blocking apps that promote short-term personal loans, which account for four of the ten most popular apps in Kenya. Part of the blame may lie with permissive regulations that exempt digital lenders from the restrictions that apply to banks.
https://qz.com/africa/1712796/mobile-loans-apps-tala-branch-okash-face-scrutiny-in-kenya/

Period-tracking apps send data to Facebook
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In a new report, Privacy International finds that at least two popular period-tracking apps, Maya and MIA Fem, shared intimate details of their users' sexual health and activity with Facebook and other entities via the Facebook Software Development Kit, Marie C. Baca reports at the Washington Post. The apps began sharing data as soon as they were opened, before users could consent to the privacy policies. The New York Times reports that unsealed Massachusetts court filings show that Facebook has suspended 69,000 apps, many for not cooperating with Facebook's investigation into their behavior; 10,000 were suspended for improperly gathering users' personal information.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/technology/2019/09/10/these-apps-may-have-told-facebook-about-last-time-you-had-sex/

Use of AI tools for surveillance expand across the globe
----------------------------------------------------------------------
According to a new report from the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, at least 75 countries are actively using AI tools such as facial recognition for surveillance, Matt O'Brien reports at AP News. Much of the technology is supplied around the world by Chinese technology companies, led by Huawei and Nikvision, followed by Japan's NEC, and US-based IBM, Palantir, and Cisco. Many of the projects cited in the report, written by Boise State University associate professor Steven Feldstein, are "smart city" systems.
https://apnews.com/d1f77d3dd2684d7e8d7d47cbd192d8dd

Copyright law threatens freedom of public information
----------------------------------------------------------------------
A preliminary ruling from the Court of Justice for the European Union has raised the possibility that public documents could be censored because of copyright law, Diego Naranja reports at EDRi. The case involved the publication of German military reports. The Court stated that copyright as claimed by the German government would only apply if the reports are an intellectual creation, and said it is up to Member States to decide case by case how to apply copyright exceptions and limitations while balancing fundamental EU rights such as freedom of information. Naranja fears that the decision may mean that national parliaments deciding how to implement the "upload filter" provision in the 2019 Copyright Directive may block documents of public relevance from public authorities in order to avoid similar judicial disputes. Also at EDRi, Bits of Freedom argues that the Dutch government should display greater ambition in transposing the Directive to protect the rights of internet users as much as possible.
https://edri.org/cjeu-public-documents-could-be-censored-because-of-copyright/

NSO Group changes policy to respect human rights
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Following reports from Citizen Lab that NSO Group's software had been used to target political activists in Mexico, UAE, and Saudi Arabia, the Israel-based company has announced it will abide by UN guidelines to prevent rights abuses, Steven Scheer reports for Reuters. Based on the company's history, Amnesty International is skeptical that the company's change of policy will make a difference.
https://uk.reuters.com/article/us-cyber-rights-nso/cyber-spying-firm-nso-to-follow-human-rights-guidelines-idUKKCN1VV11S


FEATURES AND ANALYSIS
====================

Deepfakes and the threat to democracy
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this interview and TED talk video clip, Boston University professor Danielle Citron discusses Deepfake videos and the threat they pose to the 2020 US presidential election. Writing with Robert Chesney, Citron has proposed legal changes to the role of intermediaries, as well as self-regulation and education. In an essay at the Guardian, William Davies argues that the source of our inability to agree on facts is not filter bubbles but the fact that direct access to data, and the loss of curation or framing makes it harder, not easier, to discern which points matter.
http://www.bu.edu/articles/2019/qa-laws-danielle-citron-warns-that-deepfake-videos-could-undermine-the-2020-election/
https://www.ted.com/talks/danielle_citron_how_deepfakes_undermine_truth_and_threaten_democracy
https://www.theguardian.com/media/2019/sep/19/why-cant-we-agree-on-whats-true-anymore

Sidewalk Labs Toronto plan threatens democratic governance
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this posting at Medium, Ellen P. Goodman summarizes the first expert review of the master innovation and development plan for a section of the Toronto waterfront published by Sidewalk Labs, a Google sibling, in June. The 15-member multidisciplinary Digital Advisory Strategy Advisory Panel to Waterfront Toronto's preliminary review finds that the plan is insufficiently explicit, fails to explain how it will meet the project's goals, lacks privacy protection and data governance, and gives Sidewalk too great a share of the intellectual property. Goodman notes that her forthcoming paper with Julia Powles shows how the consultation and development process leading to the published plan threatened democratic governance and illustrated the problems with tech-centered urbanism.
https://medium.com/@ellgood/sidewalk-toronto-tech-the-master-plan-6d8f76419945
https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3390610

The toxic relationship between us and our smartphones
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this posting at Medium, Maria Farrell outlines the many ways in which our relationship with our phones and electronic devices is abusive. Today, we love but do not trust our phones. In the future changed financial and political ecosystem she imagines, we could do both.
https://conversationalist.org/2019/09/13/feminism-explains-our-toxic-relationships-with-our-smartphones/

China: Social credit targets businesses first
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article at the New York Times, Alexandra Stevenson and Paul Mozur outline China's efforts to amass data about companies from public and private sources - government data, court decisions, environmental records, copyright violations, payroll data, political affiliations - and use it to grade businesses and their managers. Low-scoring companies can be banned from borrowing money, and their executives barred from traveling. Although social credit has yet to materialize for individuals on a mass scale, 33 million businesses have been given initial evaluations by the central economic planning agency, and the country hopes to make it a nationwide regulatory tool to keep the business world under party control.
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/22/business/china-social-credit-business.html

Economics of Uber don't add up
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this latest in a series of 21 postings analyzing Uber at Naked Capitalism, transport expert Hubert Horan reviews Super Pumped!, Uber's history as told by New York Times reporter Mike Isaac, who has broken many stories about the company. Isaac is readable and factually correct, Horan writes, but fundamentally misunderstands that Uber is not a successful company that was nearly undone by a reckless, boundary-pushing CEO but that of a subsidized, predatory company whose CEO's antics were board-approved and that will never recoup the $20 billion it has lost because it has no power to transform its industry in order to grow into profitability. At The New Republic, Maureen Tkacik studies a different case of managerial disaster: the 20-year-long profound change in managerial focus from safety and problem-solving to financialization that, helped by oblivious regulators and deadly software, led to the Boeing 737 MAX's two crashes earlier this year. The story shows how security and integrity of supply chains will be increasingly crucial in building - and, decades later, debugging - the hybrid cyber-physical systems of the future.
https://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2019/09/hubert-horan-can-uber-ever-deliver-part-twenty-one-mike-isaacs-book-ignores-economics-and-financial-results-and-gets-the-uber-story-almost-entirely-wrong.html

The privacy-invasive ecosystem of smart TV trackers
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting at Freedom to Tinker, a group of Princeton researchers outline their work to understand the tracking system of over-the-top streaming devices such as the Roku, Amazon Fire, and smart TVs. Although online's major trackers, Google and Facebook, are prominent, these channels are also home to lesser-known trackers such as adrise.tv and monarchads.com, and users have no effective countermeasures.
https://freedom-to-tinker.com/2019/09/18/watching-you-watch-the-tracking-ecosystem-of-over-the-top-tv-streaming-devices/


***

DIARY
==============
If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

MozFest
----------------------------------------
October 21-27, 2019
London, UK
MozFest 2019 is the tenth anniversary gathering of educators, activists, technologists, researchers, artists, and young people dedicated to creating a better, healthier internet. This year's theme is "Healthy AI".
https://www.mozillafestival.org/en/

Biometrics Congress
----------------------------------------
October 28-30, 2019
London, UK
The Biometrics Institute Congress provides an independent platform where the international biometrics community can gather to conduct off-the-record discussion among the institute's multi-stakeholder community. In 2018, representatives from over 30 nations attended. This year's theme is making the world a safer place through the responsible and ethical use of biometrics in an era where laws and regulations are often unable to stay abreast of technology change and the business models based on it.
https://www.biometricsinstitute.org/event/biometrics-congress-2019/

Web Summit
----------------------------------------
November 4-7. 2019
Lisbon, Portugal
The Web Summit gathers the founders and CEOs of technology companies, fast-growing startups, policymakers, and heads of state to ask a simple question: where to next? In 2018, speakers included Margrethe Vestager, Tim Berners-Lee, and Microsoft CEO Brad Smith.
https://websummit.com/

18th Workshop on Privacy in the Electronic Society
----------------------------------------
November 11, 2019
London, UK
The goal of this workshop, held in conjunction with the ACM CCS conference, is to discuss and find solutions to the privacy problems that result from the transformation of society brought by the Information Revolution. One of the major implications of this technological shift has been a massive increase in the collection, sharing, and analysis of personal data. The workshop will include academia, government, and industry, as well as communities such as law and business, who will present novel research on all theoretical and practical aspects of electronic privacy, as well as experimental studies of fielded systems.
http://wpes.tech/

Tech Giants, Monopoly Power, and Public Discourse
----------------------------------------
November 14-15, 2019
New York, NY, USA
At this symposium, convened by the Knight First Amendment Institute, leading legal scholars, economists, and technologists will examine the extent and nature of the technology giants' ability to structure, shape, and distort public discourse, and consider whether anti-monopoly tools might usefully be deployed to limit, expose, or counter this power. Speakers include Ellen P. Goodman, Lina Khan, Tim Wu, and Ethan Zuckerman.
https://knightcolumbia.org/content/the-tech-giants-monopoly-power-and-public-discourse

IGF Global
----------------------------------------
November 25-29, 2019
Berlin, Germany
The Internet Governance Forum (IGF) was set up in 2006 as an open discussion platform of the United Nations for key legal, political, social and technical issues relating to the internet. IGF's multi-stakeholder model aims to ensure that all relevant societal groups are equally involved in preparations and implementation: governments, civil society, business, academia, international organizations, and the technical community. This is particularly of note in terms of representatives from developing and newly industrializing countries, which otherwise tend to be under-represented.
https://www.igf2019.berlin/

Munin Conference on Scholarly Publishing
----------------------------------------
November 27-29, 2019
Tromsø, Norway
The Munin Conference is an annual conference on scholarly publishing and communication, primarily revolving around open access, open data and open science.
http://site.uit.no/muninconf/

CPDP 2020
----------------------------------------
January 22-24, 2020
Brussels, Belgium
The 2020 edition of Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection has issued a call for panels in all areas related to technological privacy and data protection.
https://www.cpdpconferences.org/call-for-panels

FAT* 2020
----------------------------------------
January 27-30, 2020
Barcelona, Spain
ACM FAT* is an annual conference dedicated to bringing together a diverse community to investigate and tackle issues in this emerging area. Topics of interest include the theory and practice of fair machine learning, measurement and auditing of deployed systems, users' experience of algorithms, and the ethical, moral, social, and policy implications of big data and ubiquitous intelligent systems.
https://fatconference.org/

Meeting of the Minds Annual Summit
----------------------------------------
February 19-21, 2020
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Attending the Meeting of the Minds Annual Summit is an opportunity for anyone seeking cross-disciplinary strategies and partnerships that deliver scalable, transferable, and equitable solutions to urban neighborhoods.
https://meetingoftheminds.org/events/motm2020

TITCTeC 2020
----------------------------------------
March 24-25, 2020
Reykjavik, Iceland
mySociety created TICTeC to bridge the gap between civic tech and research - to bring two different communities together, to emphasize the importance of being able to demonstrate impact, and to share what those impacts are. Because Reykjavik's city Council has pioneered using digital tools to elicit feedback from citizens on council policies, expenditures, and projects, the 2020 conference will provide a special opportunity to learn from Iceland's extensive civic technology and civic engagement experience.
https://www.mysociety.org/2019/09/20/join-us-in-reykjavik-for-tictec-2020/

We Robot 2020
----------------------------------------
April 2-4, 2020
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
We Robot is an interdisciplinary conference on the legal and policy questions relating to robots. The increasing sophistication of robots and their widespread deployment everywhere - from the home, to hospitals, to public spaces, and even to the battlefield - disrupts existing legal regimes and requires new thinking on policy issues. The conference fosters conversations between the people designing, building, and deploying robots, and those who design or influence the legal and social structures in which robots will operate.
https://techlaw.uottawa.ca/werobot

Global Privacy Summit
----------------------------------------
April 7-8, 2020
Washington, DC, USA
Global Privacy Summit will gather more than 3,600 professionals from around the world for an outstanding program with a truly global focus.
https://10times.com/global-privacy-summit

re:publica 2020
----------------------------------------
May 6-8, 2020
Berlin, Germany
re:publica is Europe's largest internet and digital society conference. More than 19 500 participants from 80 countries came together to discuss current issues of digital society at the three-day festival. Participants represent a cross-section of (digital) society, which include professionals from economics, politics, business, hacker culture, NGOs, media, and marketing, as well as bloggers, activists, artists, and social media experts.
https://re-publica.com/en

Creative Commons Global Summit
----------------------------------------
May 14-16, 2020
Lisbon, Portugal
The 2019 CC Summit gathered nearly 400 Creative Commoners from across the globe to attend over 130 sessions and seven keynotes. The Summit, comprising discussion, debate, workshops and planning, talks, and community building, is for anyone who's interested in the global movement for the commons as an activist, advocate, artist, librarian, educator, lawyer, or technologist.
https://creativecommons.org/2019/08/28/cc-global-summit-lisbon-may-14-16/

Privacy Law Scholars
----------------------------------------
June 4-5, 2020
Washington, DC, USA
Organized jointly by BCLT and the George Washington University Law School, the Privacy Law Scholars Conference (PLSC) assembles a wide array of privacy law scholars and practitioners from around the world to discuss current issues and foster greater connections between academia and practice. PLSC brings together privacy law scholars, privacy scholars from other disciplines (economics, philosophy, political science, computer science), and practitioners (industry, legal, advocacy, and government).
https://www.law.berkeley.edu/research/bclt/bcltevents/2020-privacy-law-scholars-conference/

Festival of AI and Emerging Technology
----------------------------------------
June 8-10, 2020
London, UK
CogX draws together speakers from industry, government, and academia to create "a space to learn, discover, and connect with the people and technologies that are shaping the future of humanity".
https://cogx.co/

RightsCon
----------------------------------------
June 9-12, 2020
San José, Costa Rica
Each year, RightsCon, organized by AccessNow, gathers over 1,000 expert speakers from around the world.
https://www.rightscon.org/

Aspen Ideas Festival
----------------------------------------
June 27-July 3, 2020
Aspen  Colorado
Presented by the Aspen Institute in partnership with The Atlantic, the Aspen Ideas Festival is a public gathering place for leaders from around the globe and across many disciplines to present and discuss the ideas and issues that both shape our lives and challenge our times. Anyone may purchase a pass to attend.
https://www.aspenideas.org/pages/register

WEIS 2020
----------------------------------------
June, 2020 (TBD)
Brussels, Belgium
The annual Workshop on the Economics of Information Security crosses the disciplines of economics, behavioural science, and computer security.
https://weis2020.econinfosec.org/

DEF CON 28
----------------------------------------
August 6-9, 2020
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
DEF CON is one of the oldest and largest continuously running hacker conventions.
https://defcon.org/index.html

Wikimania
----------------------------------------
August 2020
Bangkok, Thailand
Wikimania 2020 will be the 16th Wikimania conference, an annual event for the international Wikimedia community.
https://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/Wikimania_2020

86th World Library and Information Congress
----------------------------------------
August 15-21, 2020
Dublin, Ireland
WLIC is the annual conference of the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA).
https://2020.ifla.org/


***

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License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/
News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week ending September 13, 2019

====================================================
The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published on the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF.  Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

Current and former grantees featured in this issue: Liberty, MIT Media Lab, Open Markets Institute,  Open Rights Group, SPARC.


NEWS
=====

Jeffrey Epstein scandal envelops MIT Media Lab
----------------------------------------------------------------------
On September 7 Joichi Ito resigned as director of the MIT Media Lab after several weeks of escalating controversy over funding he accepted for the Media Lab ($525,000) and his investment fund ($1.2 million), report Kayla Epstein and Rebecca Tan at the Washington Post. The issue surfaced in August, when the suicide of convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein while awaiting trial on charges of sex trafficking of women and girls exposed Epstein's connections to prominent scientists, artists, politicians, and technologists including AI pioneer Marvin Minsky. In a September 6 New Yorker article, Ronan Farrow reports that after MIT disqualified Epstein as a donor, Ito deliberately concealed his continuing relationship with Epstein, who both donated his own funds and acted as an intermediary soliciting millions of dollars in funding from other wealthy donors, allegedly including Bill Gates. At the New York Times, Marc Tracy and Tiffany Hsu report that Gates denies any business partnership or personal relationship with Epstein, and that on September 7 Ito resigned from the boards of the MacArthur Foundation and affiliate Lever for Change, the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, and the New York Times Company, as well as a visiting professorship at Harvard. Finally, at the Guardian Lois Beckett reports that MIT has ordered an independent investigation.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/education/2019/09/07/head-mit-media-lab-resigns-amid-scandal-over-jeffrey-epstein-donations/
https://www.newyorker.com/news/news-desk/how-an-elite-university-research-center-concealed-its-relationship-with-jeffrey-epstein
https://twitter.com/macfound/status/1170443088055144448
https://www.theguardian.com/education/2019/sep/07/jeffrey-epstein-mit-media-lab-joi-ito-resigns-reports
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/07/business/mit-media-lab-jeffrey-epstein-joichi-ito.html

UK: Cardiff high court rules police use of automated facial recognition is legal
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In a case brought by a former Liberal Democrat councilor and backed by Liberty, the UK high court in Cardiff has ruled that it is legal for the South Wales Police to use automatic facial recognition to find people in crowds, Owen Bowcott reports at the Guardian. The ruling coincided with revelations that facial recognition software had been deployed across the entire 67-acre redeveloped King's Cross area of London with the cooperation of the Metropolitan Police. Mark Blunden and Jonathan Prynn report at the Evening Standard that several other areas of London - the Barbican arts complex, Liberty department store, and Hay's Galleria mall near London Bridge - have been granted planning consent to install high-definition cameras with facial recognition capability.
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2019/sep/04/police-use-of-facial-recognition-is-legal-cardiff-high-court-rules
https://www.standard.co.uk/tech/facescanning-cctv-approved-for-london-hotspots-despite-privacy-storm-a4226661.html

India: TikTok fuels violence and social division
----------------------------------------------------------------------
TikTok is fueling an epidemic of casteist speech promoting violence in societies and villages in the Indian state of Tamil Nadu, Nilesh Christopher reports at Wired. Between November 2018 and April 2019 the company removed 36,365 15-second videos that broke its rules on hate speech and religion, and 12,309 videos that included dangerous behavior and violence - 29 times the amount of pornographic content removed from the service, yet only a tenth of the number of videos that were reported to moderators. India's IT Ministry has threatened to ban TikTok.
https://www.wired.co.uk/article/tiktok-india-hate-speech-caste

Consumer advocates and student organizations oppose textbook publisher merger
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Opposition from consumer advocacy groups and student government organizations to the merger between college textbook giants Cengage and McGraw-Hill Education is growing, Lindsay McKenzie reports at Inside Higher Ed. Opponents argue that the merger would create the world's second-largest education publisher, reduce competition, eliminate the used book market, and ultimately raise prices for students. The Open Markets Institute estimates the merged publisher would control at least 41% of the higher education textbook market, approximately equal to rival publisher Pearson. In a press release, SPARC announced it has submitted a filing calling on the US Department of Justice to block the merger, arguing that it will violate the Clayton Antitrust Act and exploit students' personal data.
https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/article/2019/07/30/cengage-and-mcgraw-hill-merger-faces-growing-opposition
https://sparcopen.org/news/2019/sparc-urges-department-of-justice-to-block-merger-between-cengage-and-mcgraw-hill/

Mozilla begins rolling out DNS-over-HTTPS as Firefox default
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In late September Mozilla will begin rolling out support for the DNS-over-HTTPS (DoH) protocol by default inside Firefox, Catalin Cimpanu reports at ZDNet. DoH sends domain name system requests, which today travel the internet unencrypted, over a secure, encrypted HTTPS channel. The change is controversial because it will hide DNS traffic from internet service providers, who often use it to spot malware and other attacks, and will also disrupt some anti-virus software and parental controls. In a blog posting, Mozilla explains options for countering these problems. In a June 2019 report, the Open Rights Group explained the good and bad sides of the move. In a net.wars posting, Wendy M. Grossman summarizes the controversy as discussed at the Internet Service Providers Association conference in May.
https://www.zdnet.com/article/mozilla-to-gradually-enable-dns-over-https-for-firefox-us-users-later-this-month/
https://blog.mozilla.org/futurereleases/2019/09/06/whats-next-in-making-dns-over-https-the-default/
https://www.openrightsgroup.org/about/reports/dns-security-getting-it-right
https://www.pelicancrossing.net/netwars/2019/05/namesakes_1.html

Microsoft deletes widely-used facial recognition training dataset
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Following controversy about misuse of facial recognition software and the lack of consent of those whose images appear in the large public datasets, Microsoft has deleted its facial recognition database, MS Celeb, which was extensively used to train and test facial recognition systems, Nicole Lindsy reports for CPO Magazine. As the technology continues to expand in functionality and adoption, Microsoft is calling for it to be regulated.
https://www.cpomagazine.com/data-privacy/microsoft-deletes-massive-facial-recognition-database/


FEATURES AND ANALYSIS
====================

Filmmaker Beeban Kidron seeks to ensure children's privacy
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this profile at the New York Times, Natasha Singer discusses the efforts of independent filmmaker and House of Lords member Beeban Kidron to force Silicon Valley companies to stop exploiting children's personal data in order to manipulate their behavior. Kidron's 2013 documentary InRealLife sensitively profiles teens' use of the internet; she is also founder of 5Rights to promote children's digital rights. In 2017, she pushed the Age Appropriate Design Code through the British Parliament.
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/08/27/technology/baroness-kidron-children-tech.html

Internet shutdown paralyzes Kashmir while mesh networks protect Hong Kong protesters
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article at the New York Times, Patrick Kingsley describes how businesses and individuals cope during internet shutdowns in Zimbabwe, Sudan, Cameroon, eastern Congo, and Kashmir, where the internet has been inaccessible for the last month. Among other troubles, dissidents struggle to learn when it's safe for them to venture out of hiding. Also at the New York Times, Vindu Goel, Karan Deep Singh, and Sameer Yasir describe in detail the situation in Kashmir shortly after the outage began: pharmacies cannot restock, and the region is paralyzed. At Quartz, Matthew De Silva reports that Hong Kong protesters are turning to Bluetooth-connected mesh networks to stay organized and safe, and to provide communications in case the Chinese government shuts down internet access.
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/02/world/africa/internet-shutdown-economy.html
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/08/14/technology/india-kashmir-internet.htmll
https://qz.com/1701045/hong-kong-protestors-use-bridgefy-to-preempt-internet-shutdown/

Polish government seeks to cancel Copyright Directive upload filter
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article at TechDirt, Glyn Moody discusses the Polish government's complaint to the Court of Justice of the European Union regarding the upload filter embedded in Article 17 of the 2019 copyright directive. The complaint will force the CJEU to consider whether upload filters are "proportional and necessary".
https://www.techdirt.com/articles/20190819/08344542817/details-emerge-polish-governments-formal-request-top-eu-court-to-throw-out-upload-filters.shtml

Librarians protest privacy-invasive Lynda.com learning tool changes
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article at CNBC, Jennifer Elias finds that librarians are protesting changes to Microsoft-owned LinkedIn's Lynda.com learning tools. As part of rebranding as LinkedIn Learning, a new policy introduced without consultation requires library patrons to create LinkedIn accounts using their full names and email addresses, which librarians regard as a violation of patrons' privacy. When asked why it was necessary to create a profile to authenticate users, LinkedIn told librarians theirs wasn't a significant enough revenue stream to justify creating an alternative solution. In a blog posting, Samantha Lee, the Intellectual Freedom Committee Chair of the Connecticut Library Association, explains why LinkedIn's policy conflicts with the long-held principles librarians observe.
https://www.cnbc.com/2019/08/28/linkedin-change-to-learning-tools-registration-upsets-librarians.html
https://www.oif.ala.org/oif/?p=17968

Epstein scandal provokes profound questions about technology research funding
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article at New Republic, Evgeny Morozov highlights Jeffrey Epstein's relationship with literary agent John Brockman, whose Edge Foundation network promoted the Media Lab, TED, and Wired magazine, calling on fellow clients and networkers to join him in severing ties. In a blog posting on August 20, shortly after the news broke about Epstein's connection to the MIT Media Lab, Ethan Zuckerman explains his immediate decision to leave the lab. At Technology Review, Angela Chen and Karen Hao recount a tense Media Lab meeting intended to begin rebuilding trust that failed when founder Nicholas Negroponte defended the lab's fundraising practices. In an August 27 Guardian piece, researcher Kate Darling notes the deeper problems surrounding science funding, and at The Tech Kenyan student Arwa Mboya discusses Ito's abuse of power. In a Twitter thread, the Media Lab's sole Hispanic faculty member, Cesar A. Hidalgo, describes an environment that sidelined women and minorities. At Medium, One Laptop Per Child co-founder Mary Lou Jepsen discusses the history of the Media Lab's funding and how to change the general exclusion of women in science and technology. At the Guardian, Morozov argues that the scandal has exposed the techno-elites as "morally bankrupt opportunists".
https://newrepublic.com/article/154826/jeffrey-epsteins-intellectual-enabler
http://www.ethanzuckerman.com/blog/2019/08/20/on-me-and-the-media-lab/
https://www.technologyreview.com/s/614264/mit-media-lab-jeffrey-epstein-joi-ito-nicholas-negroponte-funding-sex-abuse/
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/aug/27/jeffrey-epstein-science-mit-brockman
https://thetech.com/2019/08/29/joi-ito-needs-to-resign
https://twitter.com/cesifoti/status/1170345117695320065
https://medium.com/@maryloujepsen/do-we-throw-joi-ito-under-the-bus-8619ccb036ec
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/sep/07/jeffrey-epstein-mit-funding-tech-intellectuals


***

DIARY
==============
If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.


MozFest
----------------------------------------
October 21-27, 2019
London, UK
MozFest 2019 is the tenth anniversary gathering of educators, activists, technologists, researchers, artists, and young people dedicated to creating a better, healthier internet. This year's theme is "Healthy AI".
https://www.mozillafestival.org/en/

Biometrics Congress
----------------------------------------
October 28-30, 2019
London, UK
The Biometrics Institute Congress provides an independent platform where the international biometrics community can gather to conduct off-the-record discussion among the institute's multi-stakeholder community. In 2018, representatives from over 30 nations attended. This year's theme is making the world a safer place through the responsible and ethical use of biometrics in an era where laws and regulations are often unable to stay abreast of technology change and the business models based on it.
https://www.biometricsinstitute.org/event/biometrics-congress-2019/

Web Summit
----------------------------------------
November 4-7. 2019
Lisbon, Portugal
The Web Summit gathers the founders and CEOs of technology companies, fast-growing startups, policymakers, and heads of state to ask a simple question: where to next? In 2018, speakers included Margrethe Vestager, Tim Berners-Lee, and Microsoft CEO Brad Smith.
https://websummit.com/

18th Workshop on Privacy in the Electronic Society
----------------------------------------
November 11, 2019
London, UK
The goal of this workshop, held in conjunction with the ACM CCS conference, is to discuss and find solutions to the privacy problems that result from the transformation of society brought by the Information Revolution. One of the major implications of this technological shift has been a massive increase in the collection, sharing, and analysis of personal data. The workshop will include academia, government, and industry, as well as communities such as law and business, who will present novel research on all theoretical and practical aspects of electronic privacy, as well as experimental studies of fielded systems.
http://wpes.tech/

Tech Giants, Monopoly Power, and Public Discourse
----------------------------------------
November 14-15, 2019
New York, NY, USA
At this symposium, convened by the Knight First Amendment Institute, leading legal scholars, economists, and technologists will examine the extent and nature of the technology giants' ability to structure, shape, and distort public discourse, and consider whether anti-monopoly tools might usefully be deployed to limit, expose, or counter this power. Speakers include Ellen P. Goodman, Lina Khan, Tim Wu, and Ethan Zuckerman.
https://knightcolumbia.org/content/the-tech-giants-monopoly-power-and-public-discourse

IGF Global
----------------------------------------
November 25-29, 2019
Berlin, Germany
The Internet Governance Forum (IGF) was set up in 2006 as an open discussion platform of the United Nations for key legal, political, social and technical issues relating to the internet. IGF's multi-stakeholder model aims to ensure that all relevant societal groups are equally involved in preparations and implementation: governments, civil society, business, academia, international organizations, and the technical community. This is particularly of note in terms of representatives from developing and newly industrializing countries, which otherwise tend to be under-represented.
https://www.igf2019.berlin/

Munin Conference on Scholarly Publishing
----------------------------------------
November 27-29, 2019
Tromsø, Norway
The Munin Conference is an annual conference on scholarly publishing and communication, primarily revolving around open access, open data and open science.
http://site.uit.no/muninconf/

CPDP 2020
----------------------------------------
January 22-24, 2020
Brussels, Belgium
The 2020 edition of Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection has issued a call for panels in all areas related to technological privacy and data protection.
https://www.cpdpconferences.org/call-for-panels

FAT* 2020
----------------------------------------
January 27-30, 2020
Barcelona, Spain
ACM FAT* is an annual conference dedicated to bringing together a diverse community to investigate and tackle issues in this emerging area. Topics of interest include the theory and practice of fair machine learning, measurement and auditing of deployed systems, users' experience of algorithms, and the ethical, moral, social, and policy implications of big data and ubiquitous intelligent systems.
https://fatconference.org/

Meeting of the Minds Annual Summit
----------------------------------------
February 19-21, 2020
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Attending the Meeting of the Minds Annual Summit is an opportunity for anyone seeking cross-disciplinary strategies and partnerships that deliver scalable, transferable, and equitable solutions to urban neighborhoods.
https://meetingoftheminds.org/events/motm2020

We Robot 2020
----------------------------------------
April 2-4, 2020
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
We Robot is an interdisciplinary conference on the legal and policy questions relating to robots. The increasing sophistication of robots and their widespread deployment everywhere - from the home, to hospitals, to public spaces, and even to the battlefield - disrupts existing legal regimes and requires new thinking on policy issues. The conference fosters conversations between the people designing, building, and deploying robots, and those who design or influence the legal and social structures in which robots will operate.
https://techlaw.uottawa.ca/werobot

Global Privacy Summit
----------------------------------------
April 7-8, 2020
Washington, DC, USA
Global Privacy Summit will gather more than 3,600 professionals from around the world for an outstanding program with a truly global focus.
https://10times.com/global-privacy-summit

re:publica 2020
----------------------------------------
May 6-8, 2020
Berlin, Germany
re:publica is Europe's largest internet and digital society conference. More than 19 500 participants from 80 countries came together to discuss current issues of digital society at the three-day festival. Participants represent a cross-section of (digital) society, which include professionals from economics, politics, business, hacker culture, NGOs, media, and marketing, as well as bloggers, activists, artists, and social media experts.
https://re-publica.com/en

Creative Commons Global Summit
----------------------------------------
May 14-16, 2020
Lisbon, Portugal
The 2019 CC Summit gathered nearly 400 Creative Commoners from across the globe to attend over 130 sessions and seven keynotes. The Summit, comprising discussion, debate, workshops and planning, talks, and community building, is for anyone who's interested in the global movement for the commons as an activist, advocate, artist, librarian, educator, lawyer, or technologist.
https://creativecommons.org/2019/08/28/cc-global-summit-lisbon-may-14-16/

Privacy Law Scholars
----------------------------------------
June 4-5, 2020
Washington, DC, USA
Organized jointly by BCLT and the George Washington University Law School, the Privacy Law Scholars Conference (PLSC) assembles a wide array of privacy law scholars and practitioners from around the world to discuss current issues and foster greater connections between academia and practice. PLSC brings together privacy law scholars, privacy scholars from other disciplines (economics, philosophy, political science, computer science), and practitioners (industry, legal, advocacy, and government).
https://www.law.berkeley.edu/research/bclt/bcltevents/2020-privacy-law-scholars-conference/

Festival of AI and Emerging Technology
----------------------------------------
June 8-10, 2020
London, UK
CogX draws together speakers from industry, government, and academia to create "a space to learn, discover, and connect with the people and technologies that are shaping the future of humanity".
https://cogx.co/

RightsCon
----------------------------------------
June 9-12, 2020
San José, Costa Rica
Each year, RightsCon, organized by AccessNow, gathers over 1,000 expert speakers from around the world.
https://www.rightscon.org/

WEIS 2020
----------------------------------------
June, 2020 (TBD)
Brussels, Belgium
The annual Workshop on the Economics of Information Security crosses the disciplines of economics, behavioural science, and computer security.
https://weis2020.econinfosec.org/

DEF CON 28
----------------------------------------
August 6-9, 2020
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
DEF CON is one of the oldest and largest continuously running hacker conventions.
https://defcon.org/index.html

Wikimania
----------------------------------------
August 2020
Bangkok, Thailand
Wikimania 2020 will be the 16th Wikimania conference, an annual event for the international Wikimedia community.
https://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/Wikimania_2020

86th World Library and Information Congress
----------------------------------------
August 15-21, 2020
Dublin, Ireland
WLIC is the annual conference of the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA).
https://2020.ifla.org/


***

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Open Society Foundations, 7th Floor, Millbank Tower, 21-24 Millbank, London SW1P 4QP, United Kingdom

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/


News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week ending July 26, 2019

====================================================
The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published on the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF.  Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

Current and former grantees featured in this issue: NOYB, Privacy International.


NEWS
=====

US: FTC approves $5 billion fine against Facebook
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The US Federal Trade Commission has approved a fine of $5 billion against Facebook after an investigation sparked by the Cambridge Analytica scandal, Cecilia Kang reports at the New York Times. The settlement, which has been criticized as not significant enough to the company, still must be approved by the Justice Department, which has rarely rejected an FTC settlement.
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/12/technology/facebook-ftc-fine.html

Indian digitization project plans to mine research papers
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Long-time open information activist Carl Malamud is working with Indian researchers to build a store of text and images extracted from 73 million journal articles published between 1847 and the present that can be scanned and mined by computers for new insights, Priyanka Pulla reports at Nature. Malamud believes the database, to be held at Jawaharlal Nehru University in New Delhi, is legal because no human will be allowed to read or search it, it is not connected to the internet, single articles can't be pulled out for perusal, and only non-commercial researchers may use it.
https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-02142-1

US: Palantir's software directly powers anti-immigrant raids
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Palantir's data mining software has directly powered the accelerating number of workplace raids conducted by the US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), and the company's staff are closely involved in ICE's operations, George Joseph reports for WNYC. The company faces a backlash from activists and its own staff at the same time that it is reportedly considering going public in 2020. At Motherboard, Caroline Haskins gives highlights of Palantir's top-secret manual for its Gotham service, which it supplies to law enforcement to underpin massive databases known as "fusion centers". The manual shows both how the software works and how police are taught to use it.
https://www.wnyc.org/story/palantir-directly-powers-ice-workplace-raids-emails-show/
https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/9kx4z8/revealed-this-is-palantirs-top-secret-user-manual-for-cops

Unauthorized use of image databases fuels adoption of facial recognition
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Dozens of giant databases of facial images compiled by companies and researchers without oversight or their subjects' knowledge are being shared around the world to train facial recognition systems, Cade Metz reports at the New York Times. Images are scraped from social networks, photo sharing websites, and dating services, or sourced from government collections of driver's license and visa photos. The Brainwash database, compiled at Stanford University, includes 10,000 images from a local cafe; these were later used by Chinese academics associated with an AI company that provides surveillance technology to the Chinese government to monitor Uighurs. At the Washington Post, Drew Harwell learns from a cache of records that both the FBI and ICE are using facial recognition software to mine state driver's license photos without the knowledge or consent of either the public or lawmakers seeking matches for undocumented immigrants or crime suspects. At the Atlantic, Tiffany C. Li notes that these rapid, widespread deployments are legal, as they do not fall within our present conceptions of "privacy".
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/13/technology/databases-faces-facial-recognition-technology.html
https://www.washingtonpost.com/technology/2019/07/07/fbi-ice-find-state-drivers-license-photos-are-gold-mine-facial-recognition-searches
https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2019/07/faceapp-reveals-huge-holes-todays-privacy-laws/594358/

Pearson Education moves textbooks to "digital first"
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Pearson Education is switching its business model to "digital first", Andrew Whalen reports at Newsweek. Beginning in the US and extending to other markets later, the company will cease updating print versions of its textbooks, which are typically updated every three years. Pearson claims the result will be to reduce prices for students while increasing its own revenues, but critics object that the move will shut down the market for renting second-hand textbooks and alienate the 92% of students who prefer print to ebooks.
https://www.newsweek.com/textbook-colleges-cheap-publisher-pearson-ebook-resell-1449860

Privacy concerns lead German state to ban Microsoft Office 365 in schools
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The data protection commissioner in the German state of Hesse has ruled that it is illegal for schools to use Microsoft Office 365 because its standard configuration raises the possibility that US officials can access  students' and teachers' personal information under the US CLOUD Act (2018), Cathrin Schaer reports at ZDNet. Students are generally unable to give consent, explains Austrian digital rights lawyer and NOYB founder Max Schrems, who is bringing a case in the European Court of Justice to challenge the US-EU Privacy Shield agreement. The software also represents a legal risk to local German authorities.
https://www.zdnet.com/article/microsoft-office-365-banned-in-german-schools-over-privacy-fears/


FEATURES AND ANALYSIS
====================

The dubious new technology of emotional recognition
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting, ACLU's Jay Stanley analyzes a study of emotion recognition, as numerous new products claim to be able to determine emotions by analyzing facial expressions and other physiological signs. After reviewing more than 1,000 papers in the psychological literature, five scientists concluded that there is no scientific basis for the claim that an individual's emotional state can be inferred from their facial movements.
https://www.aclu.org/blog/privacy-technology/surveillance-technologies/experts-say-emotion-recognition-lacks-scientific

Chinese internet outstrips the US
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this summary, the South China Morning Post gives highlights of the annual China Internet report 2019. China far outstrips the US in internet users, mobile use, and, especially, mobile payments, and is leading in 5G. The report goes on to compare the arrays of technology companies, IPOs, and venture capital firms, and notes that globally startups are beginning to copy the most successful Chinese companies.
https://multimedia.scmp.com/infographics/china-internet/

Options for data governance
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting, Privacy International Mozilla-Ford Fellow, Valentina Pavel explores four possible futures for data governance: property rights that create data markets; direct payments for data as labor; nationalized data funds; and clear user rights. A rights regime puts more responsibility on individuals to manage their data, but principles such as data minimization, purpose specification, and fairness can reduce the burden.
https://privacyinternational.org/long-read/3088/our-data-future

The truth of 2016 elections remains elusive
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this Guardian article, Carole Cadwalladr reviews Netflix's new documentary about the Facebook/Cambridge Analytica scandal she was first to investigate, The Great Hack. While setting the film in its wider context of other recent books and articles on data and democracy, Cadwalladr asks when we will ever know the truth about the 2016 US presidential election and UK's EU referendum. The UK Press Gazette reports that Leave.EU funder Arron Banks has filed a libel suit against Cadwalladr for statements in recent speeches, and has issued a legal threat against Netflix for The Great Hack. In response, the Guardian publishes an open letter from press freedom campaigners and NGOs warning the UK government that the country's courts are being used to intimidate and silence journalists working in the public interest.
https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2019/jul/20/the-great-hack-cambridge-analytica-scandal-facebook-netflix
https://www.pressgazette.co.uk/carole-cadwalladr-will-defend-true-claims-about-brexiteer-aaron-banks-in-libel-battle/
https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2019/jul/20/arron-banks-netflix-threat-great-hack-documentary
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/jul/20/letter-press-freedom-campaigners-call-for-action-on-vexatious-lawsuits

Populist leaders stress trade at the expense of automation
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this discussion of Carl Benedikt Frey's recent book, The Technology Trap, John Harris argues that we do not focus nearly enough on computing power as a cause of the widespread economic disruption and rise of populism surrounding us as transformation of production and consumption continues. Technology and automation are largely ignored by modern populist leaders, who focus instead on globalization and trade.
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/jul/22/nigel-farage-donald-trump-talking-tech-revolution-automation-populists

Regulation and new rules risk fracturing YouTube
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article at Medium's new digital video culture publication, FFWD, which he founded, Chris Stokel-Walker explains the impact of YouTube's new terms of service, which came into effect on July 22. Stokel-Walker believes that the fracturing of the platform that will result from diverging national regulations will eventually result in adopting a "lowest common denominator" regime. Also at FFWD, Amelia Tait explores how now-grown former child "reality TV" stars are finding their voices on YouTube, where they have a chance to reclaim their public image on their own terms. The same option may not be as available to today's crop of social media child stars, who have been groomed and presented by their parents, to whom the laws protecting child stars on film and TV sets do not apply.
https://ffwd.medium.com/regulation-is-coming-to-youtube-and-its-going-to-be-ugly-ac385d340cd9
https://ffwd.medium.com/reality-tv-turned-these-kids-into-villains-youtube-gave-them-a-chance-to-set-the-record-straight-f29b0f4bc3bd


***

DIARY
==============
If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

DEF CON 27
----------------------------------------
August 8-11, 2018
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
DEF CON is one of the oldest continuously running hacker conventions, and also one of the largest. The DEF CON 27 theme, in a way, responds to '1983' with new questions. What does it look like when we make the better choice? What kind of world do we hack together in the sunniest timeline? How does our real best-case scenario compare to the future we've been dreaming of for generations?
https://defcon.org/index.html

SOUPS 2019
----------------------------------------
August 11-13, 2019
Santa Clara, California, USA
The 2019 Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security (SOUPS) will bring together an interdisciplinary group of researchers and practitioners in human computer interaction, security, and privacy. The program will feature technical papers on aspects of privacy and security such as innovative functionality and design, field studies, usability evaluations of privacy features, and longitudinal studies.
https://www.usenix.org/conference/soups2019/call-for-papers

Wikimania
----------------------------------------
August 14-18, 2019
Stockholm, Sweden
Wikimania 2019 will be the 15th Wikimania conference, an annual event for the international Wikimedia community.
https://wikimania.wikimedia.org/wiki/Main_Page

85th World Library and Information Congress
----------------------------------------
August 24-30, 2019
Athens, Greece
The theme of IFLA's 2019 conference, "Libraries: dialogue for change", invites the library and information science international community to discuss, re-examine, re-think and re-interpret the role of libraries as promoters of change. In an era of rapid changes in the socio-economic-technological sphere, libraries ought to define their role as information providers, promoters of reading, settlers for the community they serve, key players in innovation, and leading actors for changes in society. A constant, open dialectic relationship between libraries and society will lead to well-informed citizens facilitating progress and development, implementing the UN Agenda for Sustainable Development and leading to prosperity in all fields of the democratic society.
https://2019.ifla.org/#news

Techfestival
----------------------------------------
September 5-7, 2019
Copenhagen, Denmark
Techfestival was created to find human answers to technological progress. In its third year, the festival will work across ten tracks to examine the ways technology shapes our societies, from building cities to exercising modern democracy.
https://techfestival.co/

MozFest
----------------------------------------
October 21-27, 2019
London, UK
MozFest 2019 is the tenth anniversary gathering of educators, activists, technologists, researchers, artists, and young people dedicated to creating a better, healthier internet. This year's theme is "More responsible artificial intelligence".
https://www.mozillafestival.org/en/

Biometrics Congress
----------------------------------------
October 28-30, 2019
London, UK
The Biometrics Institute Congress provides an independent platform where the international biometrics community can gather to conduct off-the-record discussion among the institute's multi-stakeholder community. In 2018, representatives from over 30 nations attended. This year's theme is making the world a safer place through the responsible and ethical use of biometrics in an era where laws and regulations are often unable to stay abreast of technology change and the business models based on it.
https://www.biometricsinstitute.org/event/biometrics-congress-2019/

Web Summit
----------------------------------------
November 4-7. 2019
Lisbon, Portugal
The Web Summit gathers the founders and CEOs of technology companies, fast-growing startups, policymakers, and heads of state to ask a simple question: where to next? In 2018, speakers included Margrethe Vestager, Tim Berners-Lee, and Microsoft CEO Brad Smith.
https://websummit.com/

18th Workshop on Privacy in the Electronic Society
----------------------------------------
November 11, 2019
London, UK
The goal of this workshop, held in conjunction with the ACM CCS conference, is to discuss and find solutions to the privacy problems that result from the transformation of society brought by the Information Revolution. One of the major implications of this technological shift has been a massive increase in the collection, sharing, and analysis of personal data. The workshop will include academia, government, and industry, as well as communities such as law and business, who will present novel research on all theoretical and practical aspects of electronic privacy, as well as experimental studies of fielded systems.
http://wpes.tech/

IGF Global
----------------------------------------
November 25-29, 2019
Berlin, Germany
The Internet Governance Forum (IGF) was set up in 2006 as an open discussion platform of the United Nations for key legal, political, social and technical issues relating to the internet. IGF's multi-stakeholder model aims to ensure that all relevant societal groups are equally involved in preparations and implementation: governments, civil society, business, academia, international organizations, and the technical community. This is particularly of note in terms of representatives from developing and newly industrializing countries, which otherwise tend to be under-represented.
https://www.igf2019.berlin/

Munin Conference on Scholarly Publishing
----------------------------------------
November 27-29, 2019
Tromsø, Norway
The Munin Conference is an annual conference on scholarly publishing and communication, primarily revolving around open access, open data and open science.
http://site.uit.no/muninconf/

CPDP 2020
----------------------------------------
January 22-24, 2020
Brussels, Belgium
The 2020 edition of Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection has issued a call for panels in all areas related to technological privacy and data protection.
https://www.cpdpconferences.org/call-for-panels

FAT* 2020
----------------------------------------
January 27-30, 2020
Barcelona, Spain
ACM FAT* is an annual conference dedicating to bringing together a diverse community to investigate and tackle issues in this emerging area. Topics of interest include the theory and practice of fair machine learning, measurement and auditing of deployed systems, users' experience of algorithms, and the ethical, moral, social, and policy implications of big data and ubiquitous intelligent systems.
https://fatconference.org/

Meeting of the Minds Annual Summit
----------------------------------------
February 19-21, 2020
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Attending the Meeting of the Minds Annual Summit is an opportunity for anyone seeking cross-disciplinary strategies and partnerships that deliver scalable, transferable, and equitable solutions to urban neighborhoods.
https://meetingoftheminds.org/events/motm2020

We Robot 2020
----------------------------------------
April 2-4, 2020
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
We Robot is an interdisciplinary conference on the legal and policy questions relating to robots. The increasing sophistication of robots and their widespread deployment everywhere - from the home, to hospitals, to public spaces, and even to the battlefield - disrupts existing legal regimes and requires new thinking on policy issues. The conference fosters conversations between the people designing, building, and deploying robots, and those who design or influence the legal and social structures in which robots will operate.
https://techlaw.uottawa.ca/werobot

Global Privacy Summit
----------------------------------------
April 7-8, 2020
Washington, DC, USA
Global Privacy Summit will gather more than 3,600 professionals from around the world for an outstanding program with a truly global focus.
https://10times.com/global-privacy-summit

re:publica 2020
----------------------------------------
May 6-8, 2020
Berlin, Germany
re:publica is Europe's largest internet and digital society conference. More than 19 500 participants from 80 countries came together to discuss current issues of digital society at the three-day festival. Participants represent a cross-section of (digital) society, which include professionals from economics, politics, business, hacker culture, NGOs, media, and marketing, as well as bloggers, activists, artists, and social media experts.
https://re-publica.com/en


***

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/

News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week ending June 28, 2019

====================================================
The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published on the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF.  Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

Current and former grantees featured in this issue: Communia, Creative Commons, Open Rights Group.


NEWS
=====

US considers punishing local data storage laws by limiting access to work visas
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The US has told India it is considering limiting the number of H-1B visas issued to skilled workers from countries that require foreign companies to store data locally, Neha Dasgupta and Aditya Kalra report at Reuters. Indians currently receive an estimated 70% of these visas; the cap would be set between 10% and 15%. India's data storage laws particularly affect payments companies such as Mastercard and Visa.
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-trade-india-exclusive-idUSKCN1TK2LG

Facebook-led consortium announces global digital currency
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Facebook has announced Libra, a digital currency to be governed by a consortium that includes Visa, Mastercard, Paypal, Coinbase, Andreessen Horowitz, Stripe, Uber, Lyft, and Spotify, as well as non-profits Kiva, and Women's World Banking, Frank Chaparro and Aislinn Keely report at The Block. Corporate members pay $10 million to participate. At the New York Times, Matt Stoller finds four problems: the commingling of user and financial data is dangerous for both privacy and security; insiders can selectively exploit data in anti-competitive ways; theft or hacking of Libra could place the entire financial system at risk; and Libra challenges national security and sovereignty. At the Guardian, Alex Hern finds that user activity on Facebook has dropped by almost 20% in the last year. At Pymnts.com, Karen Webster details Libra's system design, and explains why it won't bring financial inclusion for the world's 1.7 billion unbanked people as Facebook claims. Finally, at the Guardian, John Harris argues that Libra risks entrenching Facebook so deeply that governments will never be able to challenge it.
https://www.theblockcrypto.com/2019/06/14/facebooks-cryptocurrency-partners-revealed-we-obtained-the-entire-list-of-inaugural-backers/
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/19/opinion/facebook-currency-libra.html
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2019/jun/20/facebook-usage-collapsed-since-scandal-data-shows
https://www.pymnts.com/facebook/2019/what-the-launch-of-facebooks-libra-means-for-payments/
https://www.theblockcrypto.com/2019/06/18/what-will-it-take-for-facebooks-libra-to-help-the-unbanked-and-gain-traction-in-venezuela/

UK delays age verification system
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The UK has delayed implementing age verification for online pornography as required by the 2017 Digital Economy Act for at least six months because the government failed to notify the EU as required by the Technical Regulations Directive, Jim Watterson and Alex Hern report at the Guardian. The system was due to take effect on July 15. The news broke shortly after the Open Rights Group published a report on the system's implementation, which it says offers consumers little privacy protection and does not help them make informed choices.
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2019/jun/20/uks-porn-age-verification-system-to-be-delayed-indefinitely
https://www.openrightsgroup.org/press/releases/2019/org-report:-bbfc-age-verification-standard-is-pointless,-misleading-and-potentially-dangerous

Yemen: World Food Programme suspends aid to regions refusing biometrics
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The World Food Programme is partially suspending food aid in the Houthi-controlled regions of Yemen because they refuse to accept a biometric registration system the WFP says is essential to controlling food aid and combating fraud, Aaron Martin and Linnet Taylor report at Global Data Justice. The Houthis argue that the biometrics program is part of an intelligence operation and is counter to national security.
https://globaldatajustice.org/2019-06-21-biometrics-WFP/

Canada: copyright review recommends expanding fair dealing
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The 36 recommendations in Canada's five-yearly review of copyright law include expanding fair dealing, retaining internet safe harbor rules, and permitting circumvention of copy protection systems for lawful purposes such as exercising fair dealing rights, Timothy Vollmer reports for Creative Commons. At his blog, Michael Geist reviews the recommendations in detail, noting that the committee declined to recommend EU-style linking rights. At Communia, Paul Keller welcomes Canada's skepticism about the EU's approach to remuneration and online service provider liability.
https://creativecommons.org/2019/06/06/new-canadian-report-offers-balanced-recommendations-for-progressive-copyright-reform/
http://www.michaelgeist.ca/2019/06/the-authoritative-canadian-copyright-review-report-industry-committee/
https://www.communia-association.org/2019/06/13/canadian-copyright-report-lets-wait-see-upload-filters-press-publishers-rights-will-fail/

Stress and low pay plague Facebook content moderators
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Numerous Facebook content moderators working for the company's contractor, Cognizant, break their NDAs to tell The Verge's Casey Newton about their miserable and chaotic working conditions, the low pay, suicides, rapid turnover, and stress of reviewing disturbing content. Facebook, he concludes, needs to make contractors like Cognizant more accountable for their workers' mental health. In her newly-published book, Behind the Screen, Sarah T. Roberts reports on years of work investigating these invisible workers.
https://www.theverge.com/2019/6/19/18681845/facebook-moderator-interviews-video-trauma-ptsd-cognizant-tampa
https://yalebooks.yale.edu/book/9780300235883/behind-screen


FEATURES AND ANALYSIS
====================

How to control artificial intelligence
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this video clip, Daniel Dennett's lecture argues that artificial general intelligence - synthetic consciousness - is possible, though distant, but human control will be essential for our own safety. In a paper for Artificial Intelligence and Law, Joanna J. Bryson, Mihailis E. Diamantis, and Thomas D. Grant conclude that conferring legal personhood on synthetic entities, which the EU is considering, creates too many difficulties regarding accountability for violations of the rights of humans. In late May, 42 countries adopted the OECD's principles on AI, which include holding organizations and individuals accountable for the systems they develop. In a blog posting, Bryson suggests holding AI accountable by keeping and securing logs; the car industry has been able to achieve this because it was already well-regulated.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zhsiFjDoxgk
https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10506-017-9214-9
https://www.oecd.org/science/forty-two-countries-adopt-new-oecd-principles-on-artificial-intelligence.htm
https://joanna-bryson.blogspot.com/2019/01/a-smart-bureaucrats-guide-to-ai.html

Expanding video analytics creates army of robot surveillance guards
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting, ACLU's Jay Stanley summarizes his new report on the coming army of robot surveillance guards that is being created by sophisticated, high-speed video analytics, already a $3.2 billion industry. Billions of actively watching cameras in dashboards, doorbells, automated stores, when combined, he writes, will represent "an extension of corporate and bureaucratic power".
https://www.aclu.org/blog/privacy-technology/surveillance-technologies/army-robot-surveillance-guards-coming

US: Platform safe harbor under threat
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this lengthy article at Wired, Christine Biederman tells the story of the Backpage prosecution, which threatens to end the protection from liability for content users post afforded by Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act 1996. At The Verge, Adi Robertson interviews Jeff Kosseff about his new book, The Twenty-Six Words that Created the Internet, on the history of S230.
https://www.wired.com/story/inside-backpage-vicious-battle-feds/
https://www.theverge.com/2019/6/21/18700605/section-230-internet-law-twenty-six-words-that-created-the-internet-jeff-kosseff-interview

The global landscape of local news
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this series of video clips, Index on Censorship and Global Journalist survey the landscape of local news, and finds deserts in the US and Mexico and constraints in India, Poland, and Argentina. British journalists, too, are losing confidence in their ability to hold powerful interests to account. The partners go on to suggest new business models and strategies for dealing with fake news.
https://www.indexoncensorship.org/2019/06/global-journalist-local-news-in-global-decline/

African machine learning community blossoms
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article for MIT Technology Review, Karen Hao explores the African machine learning community, which is blossoming despite difficulties such as international travel. IBM Research has offices in Nairobi and Johannesburg; Google has opened a lab in Accra; and ICLR will host its flagship AI research conference in Addis Ababa next year. While the goals of these initiatives are the same as elsewhere - increasing access to health care, improving financial inclusion, enhancing food security, and improving government efficiency - the context provides new problems to explore.
https://www.technologyreview.com/s/613848/ai-africa-machine-learning-ibm-google/

US House Intelligence Committee hears testimony on deepfakes
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this livestream from June 13, the US House Intelligence Committee hears testimony on the problem of deepfakes and artificial intelligence. Among those testifying about the future, legal challenges, and impact of deepfakes, University of Maryland professor and advocate Danielle Citron, co-founder of the Cyber Civil Rights Initiative (CCRI), urges lawmakers to punish both producers and distributors. At the Huffington Post, Jesselyn Cook explores the impact of deepfake porn on the women whose faces are used without permission. CCRI has helped pass laws banning revenge porn in 38 US states. At the Guardian, Oscar Schwartz argues that deepfakes are a power problem, not a technology problem, and says technological solutions will not fix the "deep-seated social problem of truth decay and polarization".
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tdLS9MlIWOk
https://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/deepfake-porn-heres-what-its-like-to-see-yourself_n_5d0d0faee4b0a3941861fced
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/jun/24/deepfakes-facebook-silicon-valley-responsibility
https://www.cybercivilrights.org/


***

DIARY
==============
If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

ORGCon
----------------------------------------
July 13, 2019
London, UK
Themes for this year's ORGCon are digital privacy; free speech, censorship, and the role of algorithms; mass government surveillance; and data and democracy.
https://orgcon.openrightsgroup.org/2019/

PETS 2019
----------------------------------------
July 16-20, 2019
Stockholm, Sweden
The 19th Privacy Enhancing Technologies Symposium will bring together privacy experts from around the world to present and discuss recent advances and new perspectives on research in privacy technologies. PETS/PoPETs is the premier venue for novel applied and/or theoretical research into the design, analysis, experimentation, or fielding of privacy-enhancing technologies.
https://petsymposium.org/

DEF CON 27
----------------------------------------
August 8-11, 2018
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
DEF CON is one of the oldest continuously running hacker conventions, and also one of the largest. The DEF CON 27 theme, in a way, responds to '1983' with new questions. What does it look like when we make the better choice? What kind of world do we hack together in the sunniest timeline? How does our real best-case scenario compare to the future we've been dreaming of for generations?
https://defcon.org/index.html

SOUPS 2019
----------------------------------------
August 11-13, 2019
Santa Clara, California, USA
The 2019 Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security (SOUPS) will bring together an interdisciplinary group of researchers and practitioners in human computer interaction, security, and privacy. The program will feature technical papers on aspects of privacy and security such as innovative functionality and design, field studies, usability evaluations of privacy features, and longitudinal studies.
https://www.usenix.org/conference/soups2019/call-for-papers

Wikimania
----------------------------------------
August 14-18, 2019
Stockholm, Sweden
Wikimania 2019 will be the 15th Wikimania conference, an annual event for the international Wikimedia community.
https://wikimania.wikimedia.org/wiki/Main_Page

85th World Library and Information Congress
----------------------------------------
August 24-30, 2019
Athens, Greece
The theme of IFLA's 2019 conference, "Libraries: dialogue for change", invites the library and information science international community to discuss, re-examine, re-think and re-interpret the role of libraries as promoters of change. In an era of rapid changes in the socio-economic-technological sphere, libraries ought to define their role as information providers, promoters of reading, settlers for the community they serve, key players in innovation, and leading actors for changes in society. A constant, open dialectic relationship between libraries and society will lead to well-informed citizens facilitating progress and development, implementing the UN Agenda for Sustainable Development and leading to prosperity in all fields of the democratic society.
https://2019.ifla.org/#news

Techfestival
----------------------------------------
September 5-7, 2019
Copenhagen, Denmark
Techfestival was created to find human answers to technological progress. In its third year, the festival will work across ten tracks to examine the ways technology shapes our societies, from building cities to exercising modern democracy.
https://techfestival.co/

MozFest
----------------------------------------
October 21-27, 2019
London, UK
MozFest 2019 is the tenth anniversary gathering of educators, activists, technologists, researchers, artists, and young people dedicated to creating a better, healthier internet. This year's theme is "More responsible artificial intelligence".
https://www.mozillafestival.org/en/

Biometrics Congress
----------------------------------------
October 28-30, 2019
London, UK
The Biometrics Institute Congress provides an independent platform where the international biometrics community can gather to conduct off-the-record discussion among the institute's multi-stakeholder community. In 2018, representatives from over 30 nations attended. This year's theme is making the world a safer place through the responsible and ethical use of biometrics in an era where laws and regulations are often unable to stay abreast of technology change and the business models based on it.
https://www.biometricsinstitute.org/event/biometrics-congress-2019/

Web Summit
----------------------------------------
November 4-7. 2019
Lisbon, Portugal
The Web Summit gathers the founders and CEOs of technology companies, fast-growing startups, policymakers, and heads of state to ask a simple question: where to next? In 2018, speakers included Margrethe Vestager, Tim Berners-Lee, and Microsoft CEO Brad Smith.
https://websummit.com/

18th Workshop on Privacy in the Electronic Society
----------------------------------------
November 11, 2019
London, UK
The goal of this workshop, held in conjunction with the ACM CCS conference, is to discuss and find solutions to the privacy problems that result from the transformation of society brought by the Information Revolution. One of the major implications of this technological shift has been a massive increase in the collection, sharing, and analysis of personal data. The workshop will include academia, government, and industry, as well as communities such as law and business, who will present novel research on all theoretical and practical aspects of electronic privacy, as well as experimental studies of fielded systems.
http://wpes.tech/

IGF Global
----------------------------------------
November 25-29, 2019
Berlin, Germany
The Internet Governance Forum (IGF) was set up in 2006 as an open discussion platform of the United Nations for key legal, political, social and technical issues relating to the internet. IGF's multi-stakeholder model aims to ensure that all relevant societal groups are equally involved in preparations and implementation: governments, civil society, business, academia, international organizations, and the technical community. This is particularly of note in terms of representatives from developing and newly industrializing countries, which otherwise tend to be under-represented.
https://www.igf2019.berlin/

Munin Conference on Scholarly Publishing
----------------------------------------
November 27-29, 2019
Tromsø, Norway
The Munin Conference is an annual conference on scholarly publishing and communication, primarily revolving around open access, open data and open science.
http://site.uit.no/muninconf/

CPDP 2020
----------------------------------------
January 22-24, 2020
Brussels, Belgium
The 2020 edition of Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection has issued a call for panels in all areas related to technological privacy and data protection.
https://www.cpdpconferences.org/call-for-panels

FAT* 2020
----------------------------------------
January 27-30, 2020
Barcelona, Spain
ACM FAT* is an annual conference dedicating to bringing together a diverse community to investigate and tackle issues in this emerging area. Topics of interest include the theory and practice of fair machine learning, measurement and auditing of deployed systems, users' experience of algorithms, and the ethical, moral, social, and policy implications of big data and ubiquitous intelligent systems.
https://fatconference.org/

Meeting of the Minds Annual Summit
----------------------------------------
February 19-21, 2020
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Attending the Meeting of the Minds Annual Summit is an opportunity for anyone seeking cross-disciplinary strategies and partnerships that deliver scalable, transferable, and equitable solutions to urban neighborhoods.
https://meetingoftheminds.org/events/motm2020

We Robot 2020
----------------------------------------
April 2-4, 2020
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
We Robot is an interdisciplinary conference on the legal and policy questions relating to robots. The increasing sophistication of robots and their widespread deployment everywhere - from the home, to hospitals, to public spaces, and even to the battlefield - disrupts existing legal regimes and requires new thinking on policy issues. The conference fosters conversations between the people designing, building, and deploying robots, and those who design or influence the legal and social structures in which robots will operate.
https://techlaw.uottawa.ca/werobot

Global Privacy Summit
----------------------------------------
April 7-8, 2020
Washington, DC, USA
Global Privacy Summit will gather more than 3,600 professionals from around the world for an outstanding program with a truly global focus.
https://10times.com/global-privacy-summit

re:publica 2020
----------------------------------------
May 6-8, 2020
Berlin, Germany
re:publica is Europe's largest internet and digital society conference. More than 19,500 participants from 80 countries came together to discuss current issues of digital society at the three-day festival. Participants represent a cross-section of (digital) society, which include professionals from economics, politics, business, hacker culture, NGOs, media, and marketing, as well as bloggers, activists, artists, and social media experts.
https://re-publica.com/en


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News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week ending June 14, 2019

====================================================
The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published on the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF.  Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

Current and former grantees featured in this issue: Centrum Cyfrowe, Communia, EDRi, EFF, noyb, Open Knowledge Foundation.


NEWS
=====

Poland files legal complaint against the EU Copyright Directive
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Poland, which opposed the Copyright Directive the EU passed in March, has filed a complaint against the new rules in the Court of Justice of the European Union, Cory Doctorow reports at BoingBoing. At The Parliament Magazine, Martin Banks reports that former Scottish MEP Catherine Stihler, now chief executive of the Open Knowledge Foundation, welcomes the complaint against "this chilling attack on freedom of expression". In a posting at Communia, Natalia Mileszyck gives further background on the complaint, deplores regrets the political aspect of what should be a non-partisan complaintmatter, and notes that the Centrum Cyfrowe Foundation has filed an FOI request for a copy of the text of the complaint.
https://boingboing.net/2019/05/26/filternet-well.html
https://www.theparliamentmagazine.eu/articles/news/former-mep-welcomes-polish-complaint-over-new-eu-copyright-directive
https://www.communia-association.org/2019/06/01/copyright-directive-challenged-cjeu-polish-government/

Irish Supreme Court allows Schrems complaint against Facebook to proceed
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The Irish Supreme Court has refused Facebook's application to block the referral of Max Schrems' case against Facebook to the Court of Justice of the European Union, Schrems reports at noyb. The case began in 2013, when Edward Snowden's revelation that Facebook allows the US government to engage in "mass processing" of Europeans' personal data despite the EU's data protection laws led Max Schrems to bring a complaint to the Irish Data Protection Commissioner. CJEU will hear the case on July 9, and after that the Commissioner will finally have to rule on the original complaint.
https://edri.org/facebook-fails-to-avoid-cjeu-judgment-on-nsa-case/

Czech Republic: Court allows data retention law to stand
----------------------------------------------------------------------
After 14 years, the Czech Constitutional Court has rejected Iuridicum Remedium's proposal to declare the Czech data retention law unconstitutional, IuRe reports at EDRi. The law was enacted as the Czech Republic's national implementation of the EU Data Retention Directive, which the Court of Justice of the European Union ruled invalid in 2014.
https://edri.org/czech-constitutional-court-rejects-complaint-on-data-retention/
https://edri.org/data-retention-eu-commission-inconclusive-about-potential-new-legislation/

Amazon Ring doorbells create police-sponsored private surveillance network
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Amazon's camera-equipped Ring doorbells and Neighbors app are creating widespread private surveillance networks promoted by police departments offering discounts on the devices, Alfred Ng reports at CNet. In some of these deals, police require recipients to turn over footage on request. Ring responds that it does not support such conditions. On Twitter, Access Now's Amie Stepanovich posts the Ring's terms of service, which grant Ring and its licensees a royalty-free perpetual license to all videos the doorbells record. At the Guardian, Erin Durkin reports that 130 Brooklyn residents have filed a formal complaint with the state to block their landlord from installing a facial recognition-operated building access control system, a practice that is quietly spreading. The tenants believe the system is discriminatory and intended to fuel gentrification.
https://www.cnet.com/features/amazons-helping-police-build-a-surveillance-network-with-ring-doorbells/
https://twitter.com/astepanovich/status/1136696387104575488
https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2019/may/29/new-york-facial-recognition-cameras-apartment-complex

Chinese censors erase memories of Tiananmen Square
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article at Vice, David Gilbert documents China's efforts to erase the June 4, 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre from the internet. Inside China, more than 10,000 domains, including Wikipedia, Google, Facebook, and Twitter, and a blacklist of over 300 words keeps all mention of the protests from view. In the lead-up to the 30th anniversary, the Chinese government forced the social media platform Weibo to shut down comments and block international users from logging in. The result is "collective amnesia" and a generation deliberately kept in ignorance of its country's past. The Weiboscope project is documenting how older Chinese citizens mark the anniversary, but many use codes younger people don't understand. Cate Cadell interviews content screening workers at Beijing Bytedance who say that the censorship is largely automated and very accurate, and news is rejected unless it comes from state-controlled media first.
https://news.vice.com/en_us/article/7xge3b/chinese-dissidents-are-running-out-of-ways-to-remember-tiananmen-square
https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2019/06/30-years-tiananmen-square-state-chinese-censorship-and-digital-surveillance
https://theintercept.com/2019/06/07/china-bans-the-intercept-and-other-news-sites-in-censorship-black-friday/

US technology companies oppose Huawei ban
----------------------------------------------------------------------
US technology companies, particularly chip makers, are seeking exceptions from the Trump administration's ban on selling to China's Huawei claiming it will undermine their profits and ability to innovate, Reed Albergotti reports for the Washington Post.  At Quartz, John Detrixhe reviews the ban's other consequences, which are now beginning to surface. Google claims Huawei's likely move to fork Android will damage US national security; Facebook is barring Huawei from pre-installing its apps; and self-driving cars may be delayed because Huawei is the only supplier that as yet can supply reliable 5G equipment. At Nikkei Asian Review, Toyoki Nakanishi suggests that although users can still download these apps, updates will fail because they won't have Android updates . At the Washington Post, Jordan Link details Huawei's deeply embedded position in Africa.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/technology/2019/06/07/huawei-ban-threatens-us-national-security-tech-companies-warn-trump-administration/
https://qz.com/1638782/google-warns-against-cutting-huawei-off-from-its-android-os/
https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/2019/06/10/what-do-we-know-about-huaweis-africa-presence/


FEATURES AND ANALYSIS
====================

Ransomware attack paralyzes Baltimore government systems
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this podcast from WNYC, city hall reporter Emily Sullivan and Syracuse University professor Lee W. McKnight discuss the ransomware attack that has denied the city of Baltimore and its residents access to government systems for a month. The city refuses to pay the demanded BTC13 (about $100,000), a responsible decision that will nonetheless is likely cost the city over $10 million and months of downtime . There have been at least 169 such attacks on US state and local governments, including the city of Atlanta, since 2013. Governments are soft targets because overworked staff and budget constraints leave few resources for security, training, or modernizing systems. Baltimore's attack was traced to a two-year-old unpatched vulnerability.
https://www.wnycstudios.org/story/ransomware-attack-leaves-baltimore-locked-out-city-hall	

Privatization, platformization, and domination: the challenges of smart cities
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this op-ed at The Globe and Mail, Rutgers law professor Ellen P. Goodman discusses the lessons she and Julia Powles learned from their newly-published study of the Sidewalk Labs development in Toronto. Goodman advises residents of cities with similar projects to keep their eye on the curb: who will gather and govern the data there? Who will be in charge of enforcing the law? Who will collect the penalties for infractions? How those contracts are awarded can make the difference between public space and vendor lock-in. In the paper, they discuss the challenges of privatization, platformization, and domination in more depth.
https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opinion/article-curb-its-enthusiasm-why-sidewalk-labs-fast-moving-plans-for-toronto/
https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3390610

Workshop studies the economics of information security
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this series of postings at Light Blue Touchpaper, Cambridge security engineer Ross Anderson liveblogs the Workshop on the Economics of Information Security (remotely, because Anderson, along with two prominent cryptographers, was unable to obtain a US visa to attend in person). Among the wide range of topics are AI in military decision making, the lack of incentives for companies to invest in cybersecurity, trust in algorithms, and the behavioral aspects of privacy.
https://www.lightbluetouchpaper.org/2019/06/05/shb-2019-liveblog/#comments

Uber forges destructive path through society
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article at American Affairs, transport expert Hubert Horan reviews the risks to society posed by Uber, which his financial analysis shows is unlikely to ever become sustainably profitable. We all share the damage: Uber uses its (artificial) market power to depress drivers' pay, solves no structural industry problems, and has survived only by burning billions of dollars in subsidies while engaging in "legal disobedience, competitor sabotage, harassment of critical journalists and of people who sued Uber, obstruction of local law enforcement, and intellectual property theft". Crucial to Uber's success is convincing local governments to cede control of the taxi industry from democratically accountable regulators to private investors - a campaign copy-and-pasted from a 1990s Koch brothers-funded effort to deregulate the taxi industry.
https://americanaffairsjournal.org/2019/05/ubers-path-of-destruction/

Academics protest Palantir privacy conference sponsorship
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this opinion piece at the Guardian, Marisa Franco summarizes the letter signed by more than 140 academics, including Naomi Klein and Douglas Rushkoff, asking the Privacy Law Scholars conference and the University of California at Berkeley, where the conference was held in late May, to drop Palantir as a sponsor because it helps Immigration and Customs Enforcement separate families and deport immigrants. The letter also calls on the conference co-founders, Chris Hoofnagle and Daniel Solove, to resign from the company's advisory board on privacy and civil liberties. In 2018, DATACTIVE boycotted the Amsterdam Privacy Conference for accepting Palantir's sponsorship.
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/may/31/palantir-berkeley-immigrant-families-apart
https://data-activism.net/2018/09/why-we-wont-be-at-apc-2018/

Tim Berners-Lee seeks to revive communities and networks
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting, Ethan Zuckerman watches Jonathan Zittrain and Tim Berners-Lee discuss the latter's Solid, a new protocol for personal clouds, and Inrupt, the company he's founded to promote it, as positive means to revive the sociotechnical system of networks and communities that Facebook has overwhelmed. Berners-Lee believes Solid stands a chance at widespread adoption because it does not disrupt what's already in place. Zuckerman is also working on methods of creating new communities for small groups and sees Solid as a potential underpinning.
http://www.ethanzuckerman.com/blog/2019/06/06/sir-tim-versus-black-mirror/


***

DIARY
==============
If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

Data for Policy
----------------------------------------
June 11-12, 2019
London, UK
The fourth international Data for Policy conference has "Digital Trust and Personal Data" as its main theme. The conference will also welcome contributions in the broader data science for government and policy discussions. In particular, the organizers encourage submissions around the value and harm of using data in the public sector, deployment experience in government, "digital ethics" and "ethics engineering" concepts, personal data sharing frameworks and technologies, transparency in machine learning processes, analytics at source, and secure data transaction methodologies.
http://dataforpolicy.org/

RightsCon 2019
----------------------------------------
June 11-14, 2019
Tunis, Tunisia
RightsCon Tunis will continue to be a space for civil society, technologists, businesses, startups, public servants, and lawyers to connect, collaborate, build strategies, draft declarations, and move forward real-world change. Whether in provocative plenaries, intimate roundtables, informal meetings, or the lively Community Village, RightsCon Tunis will help shape the future of human rights in the digital age.
https://www.rightscon.org/about/

The Web That Was
----------------------------------------
June 19-21, 2019
Amsterdam, Netherlands
As the first generation of web users ages, the early web has become simply another object of nostalgia. The third biennial Research Infrastructure for the Study of Archived Web Materials (RESAW) conference will rethink our relationship to the web's past and the past web, and consider how to reconstruct and re-evaluate its history. The conference will host a lecture-performance by Geert Lovink and guests on the history and preservation of Amsterdam's early internet culture.
https://thewebthatwas.net

Africa Data Protection and Privacy Conference
----------------------------------------
June 24-28, 2019
Accra, Ghana
The first Africa Data Protection and Privacy Conference, convened by the Network of African Data Protection Authorities and Ghana Data Protection Commission, will bring together established authorities in Africa and their Global North counterparts for thought leadership, insight, best practice, high level strategic content, and networking, providing a critical platform for promoting Africa's drive for data protection and privacy laws in Africa.
https://www.ardppc.com/eng/

LIBER 2019
----------------------------------------
June 26-28, 2019
Dublin, Ireland
The LIBER Conference 2019 will be held in collaboration with CONUL, the Consortium of National and University Libraries for the island of Ireland. The conference brings library directors and their staff together for three days of networking and collaboration. The goal of the conference is to identify the most pressing needs for research libraries, and to share information and ideas for addressing those needs.
https://liberconference.eu/dublin2019/

ORGCon
----------------------------------------
July 13, 2019
London, UK
Themes for this year's shortly-to-be-announced ORGCon are digital privacy; free speech, censorship, and the role of algorithms; mass government surveillance; and data and democracy.
https://orgcon.openrightsgroup.org/2019/

PETS 2019
----------------------------------------
July 16-20, 2019
Stockholm, Sweden
The 19th Privacy Enhancing Technologies Symposium will bring together privacy experts from around the world to present and discuss recent advances and new perspectives on research in privacy technologies. PETS/PoPETs is the premier venue for novel applied and/or theoretical research into the design, analysis, experimentation, or fielding of privacy-enhancing technologies.
https://petsymposium.org/

DEF CON 27
----------------------------------------
August 8-11, 2018
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
DEF CON is one of the oldest continuously running hacker conventions, and also one of the largest. The DEF CON 27 theme, in a way, responds to '1983' with new questions. What does it look like when we make the better choice? What kind of world do we hack together in the sunniest timeline? How does our real best-case scenario compare to the future we've been dreaming of for generations?
https://defcon.org/index.html

SOUPS 2019
----------------------------------------
August 11-13, 2019
Santa Clara, California, USA
The 2019 Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security (SOUPS) will bring together an interdisciplinary group of researchers and practitioners in human computer interaction, security, and privacy. The program will feature technical papers on aspects of privacy and security such as innovative functionality and design, field studies, usability evaluations of privacy features, and longitudinal studies.
https://www.usenix.org/conference/soups2019/call-for-papers

Wikimania
----------------------------------------
August 14-18, 2019
Stockholm, Sweden
Wikimania 2019 will be the 15th Wikimania conference, an annual event for the international Wikimedia community.
https://wikimania.wikimedia.org/wiki/Main_Page

85th World Library and Information Congress
----------------------------------------
August 24-30, 2019
Athens, Greece
The theme of IFLA's 2019 conference, "Libraries: dialogue for change", invites the library and information science international community to discuss, re-examine, re-think and re-interpret the role of libraries as promoters of change. In an era of rapid changes in the socio-economic-technological sphere, libraries ought to define their role as information providers, promoters of reading, settlers for the community they serve, key players in innovation, and leading actors for changes in society. A constant, open dialectic relationship between libraries and society will lead to well-informed citizens facilitating progress and development, implementing the UN Agenda for Sustainable Development and leading to prosperity in all fields of the democratic society.
https://2019.ifla.org/#news

Biometrics Congress
----------------------------------------
October 28-30, 2019
London, UK
The Biometrics Institute Congress provides an independent platform where the international biometrics community can gather to conduct off-the-record discussion among the institute's multi-stakeholder community. In 2018, representatives from over 30 nations attended. This year's theme is making the world a safer place through the responsible and ethical use of biometrics in an era where laws and regulations are often unable to stay abreast of technology change and the business models based on it.
https://www.biometricsinstitute.org/event/biometrics-congress-2019/

Web Summit
----------------------------------------
November 4-7. 2019
Lisbon, Portugal
The Web Summit gathers the founders and CEOs of technology companies, fast-growing startups, policymakers, and heads of state to ask a simple question: where to next? In 2018, speakers included Margrethe Vestager, Tim Berners-Lee, and Microsoft CEO Brad Smith.
https://websummit.com/

18th Workshop on Privacy in the Electronic Society
----------------------------------------
November 11, 2019
London, UK
The goal of this workshop, held in conjunction with the ACM CCS conference, is to discuss and find solutions to the privacy problems that result from the transformation of society brought by the Information Revolution. One of the major implications of this technological shift has been a massive increase in the collection, sharing, and analysis of personal data. The workshop will include academia, government, and industry, as well as communities such as law and business, who will present novel research on all theoretical and practical aspects of electronic privacy, as well as experimental studies of fielded systems.
http://wpes.tech/

IGF Global
----------------------------------------
November 25-29, 2019
Berlin, Germany
The Internet Governance Forum (IGF) was set up in 2006 as an open discussion platform of the United Nations for key legal, political, social and technical issues relating to the internet. IGF's multi-stakeholder model aims to ensure that all relevant societal groups are equally involved in preparations and implementation: governments, civil society, business, academia, international organizations, and the technical community. This is particularly of note in terms of representatives from developing and newly industrializing countries, which otherwise tend to be under-represented.
https://www.igf2019.berlin/

Munin Conference on Scholarly Publishing
----------------------------------------
November 27-29, 2019
Tromsø, Norway
The Munin Conference is an annual conference on scholarly publishing and communication, primarily revolving around open access, open data and open science.
http://site.uit.no/muninconf/

CPDP 2020
----------------------------------------
January 22-24, 2020
Brussels, Belgium
The 2020 edition of Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection has issued a call for panels in all areas related to technological privacy and data protection.
https://www.cpdpconferences.org/call-for-panels

FAT* 2020
----------------------------------------
January 27-30, 2020
Barcelona, Spain
ACM FAT* is an annual conference dedicating to bringing together a diverse community to investigate and tackle issues in this emerging area. Topics of interest include the theory and practice of fair machine learning, measurement and auditing of deployed systems, users' experience of algorithms, and the ethical, moral, social, and policy implications of big data and ubiquitous intelligent systems.
https://fatconference.org/

Meeting of the Minds Annual Summit
----------------------------------------
February 19-21, 2020
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Attending the Meeting of the Minds Annual Summit is an opportunity for anyone seeking cross-disciplinary strategies and partnerships that deliver scalable, transferable, and equitable solutions to urban neighborhoods.
https://meetingoftheminds.org/events/motm2020

We Robot 2020
----------------------------------------
April 2-4, 2020
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
We Robot is an interdisciplinary conference on the legal and policy questions relating to robots. The increasing sophistication of robots and their widespread deployment everywhere - from the home, to hospitals, to public spaces, and even to the battlefield - disrupts existing legal regimes and requires new thinking on policy issues. The conference fosters conversations between the people designing, building, and deploying robots, and those who design or influence the legal and social structures in which robots will operate.
https://techlaw.uottawa.ca/werobot


***

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Our mailing address is:
Open Society Foundations, 7th Floor, Millbank Tower, 21-24 Millbank, London SW1P 4QP, United Kingdom

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/
News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week ending May 24, 2019

====================================================
The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published on the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF.  Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

Current and former grantees featured in this issue: Article 19, Bits of Freedom, EDRi, EFF, Epicenter.works, La Quadrature du Net, and Ranking Digital Rights.


NEWS
=====

Facebook bans election-disrupting Israeli company
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Facebook banned an Israeli company that ran a campaign aimed at disrupting and influencing elections in a number of countries and deleted dozens of accounts that were spreading disinformation, the Associated Press reports at the Japan Times. The company linked the campaign to the Tel Aviv-based political consulting and lobbying firm Archimedes. Separately, at Wired Amit Katwala writes that a false rumor of imminent bankruptcy spread via WhatsApp led West London's Tamil community to rush to empty their Metro Bank accounts. In a new report, researchers from the UK's Demos think tank study 39 hostile online information operations and conclude that they use numerous strategies and tactics to selectively amplify mainstream news stories to fit their agenda of exploiting existing cultural and social divisions. Focusing on correcting facts is only a partial solution, and governments should expand their definition of information warfare and be prepared to scale up a response rapidly when needed.
https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2019/05/17/business/facebook-busts-israel-based-fake-news-campaign-disrupt-elections-worldwide/
https://www.wired.co.uk/article/metro-bank-share-price-whats-app-hoax
https://demos.co.uk/project/warring-songs-information-operations-in-the-digital-age/

Coalition asks EU to ban Deep Packet Inspection
----------------------------------------------------------------------
A coalition of 46 NGOs, academics, and companies from 16 countries, including EFF, Article 19, Bits of Freedom, and La Quadrature du Net, have sent an open letter to European policy makers and regulators urging them to take action against telecoms companies using Deep Packet Inspection (DPI), EDRi reports. A recent Epicenter.works study to map zero-rating offers in Europe finds 186 telecom services that potentially use DPI to enable them to discriminate between different types of internet traffic despite a ban on the practice.
https://edri.org/ngos-and-academics-warn-against-deep-packet-inspection/
https://epicenter.works/document/1522

Apple faces consumer lawsuit over App Store monopoly
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The US Supreme Court has ruled that four US iPhone owners are free to sue Apple over the 30% commission it charges developers for sales through its App Store, Kieren McCarthy reports at The Register. Apple argued that the lawsuit is invalid because only app developers should have standing to sue the company over the charges they pay. The Supreme Court's majority opinion held that Apple is using its monopoly on the iOS platform to overcharge customers. The case will now be heard in the district court.
https://www.theregister.co.uk/2019/05/13/apple_supreme_court/

San Francisco bans facial recognition
----------------------------------------------------------------------
San Francisco is the first city to ban police and other agencies from using facial recognition to identify suspects of crimes both large and small, the New York Times reports. Oakland CA and Boston suburb Somerville MA are considering similar bans, though critics believe it would be better to develop regulations that prohibit abuse but allow cities to reap the benefits of the technology. CNet outlines the workings of Illinois' Biometric Information Privacy Act (2008, amended 2016); the Act bars Sony from selling its Aibo robot dog and means Google turns off facial recognition in its Nest thermostats. At Vox, Sigal Samuel argues that efforts to reduce bias and discrimination in AI-based systems risk harming black, gay, and trans people by making them easier for the surrounding profoundly discriminatory system to identify.
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/14/us/facial-recognition-ban-san-francisco.html
https://www.cnet.com/news/what-sonys-robot-dog-teaches-us-about-biometric-data-privacy/
https://www.vox.com/future-perfect/2019/4/19/18412674/ai-bias-facial-recognition-black-gay-transgender

Indonesia leads the world in open access
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Indonesia leads the world in open access publishing, with 81% of 2017's 20,000 journal entries available to read online for free, Richard van Noorden reports at Nature. Also high on the list are Colombia, Bangladesh, and Brazil, with more than 60% of research articles freely readable. Despite the EU's Plan S, it trails behind.
https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-01536-5

US: State of Georgia and public records campaigner seek Supreme Court ruling
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Long-time campaigner for open access to public information Carl Malamud and his group, public.resource.org, are being accused of "terrorism" for putting the Official Code of Georgia Annotated online, Adam Liptak reports at the New York Times. Both the State of Georgia, which brought the lawsuit and lost in federal appeals court, and Malamud's group are asking the US Supreme Court to rule on whether annotated codes can be copyrighted. Placing state law under the control of legal publishers is a growing trend.
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/13/us/politics/georgia-official-code-copyright.html


FEATURES AND ANALYSIS
====================

Ghost work
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this podcast from Data & Society, Mary L. Gray discusses her new book, Ghost Work, written with with Siddharth Suri, which exposes the invisible human workforce that powers the "AI" in services delivered by Amazon, Google, Microsoft, and Uber. An estimated 8% of Americans have worked at least once as the raters, proofreaders, and engine parts designers Gray includes in the "ghost economy". Among those workers, Gray has found young mothers, early retirees, recent graduates, minorities who can't get the jobs they want, and some for whom the jobs open opportunities.
https://listen.datasociety.net/ghost-work/

Structural disconnects between law and algorithmic decision making
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In this article at Humanitarian Law & Policy, Suresh Venkatasubramanian examines the disconnects between how law works and how algorithmic decision making systems work. Algorithmic systems are judged by the outcome, but the fairness of a legal procedure is judged by the process its implementers follow - for example, in deciding whether someone in a war zone should be detained. In a 2017 talk at the Royal Society, Mireille Hildebrandt discussed the difference between law and regulation, and noted that automation lacks the flexibility required for law and turns it into mere administration.
https://blogs.icrc.org/law-and-policy/2019/04/25/structural-disconnects-algorithmic-decision-making-law/
http://downloads.royalsociety.org/events/2017/10/algorithms-society/Hildebrandt.mp3

Delays await in delivering autonomous vehicles and artificial general intelligence
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In this blog posting, the Australian roboticist Rodney Brooks argues that it will be 30 to 50 years before fully autonomous cars will be a common sight on the public roads - and even longer for artificial general intelligence to be developed, despite Ray Kurzweil's long-running insistence that we will see it by 2029 (and a Singularity by 2030). In a podcast at Harvard Business Review, professor Missy Cummings, director of the Humans and Autonomy Lab at Duke University tells journalist-turned-entrepreneur Azeem Azhar that full, level 5 autonomy for vehicles is a long way off.
https://rodneybrooks.com/agi-has-been-delayed/
https://hbr.org/podcast/2019/05/the-truth-about-autonomy

Free-to-play mobile games closely track users
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In this article at Vox, Kaitlyn Tiffany investigates the data collection aspects of mobile games. Few people remember, but in 2014 Edward Snowden's leaked documents included the 2009 hit Angry Birds on the list of "leaky" apps the NSA used to access private information. Many people do not realize how significant and revealing game play data can be because they don't think of it as personal, like messaging, or sensitive, like credit card numbers. Yet a free-to-play game like Candy Crush may have as many as ten advertising intermediaries tracking players' every move - and these provide its only source of revenue.
https://www.vox.com/explainers/2019/5/7/18273355/angry-birds-phone-games-data-collection-candy-crush

Microsoft leads 2019 digital rights rankings
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Ranking Digital Rights has rated Microsoft as the leader of 2019's index of internet and mobile ecosystem companies with respect to digital rights. Among telecommunications companies Telefónica has improved the most to take the top spot from Vodafone. The report scores 24 companies on 35 indicators of governance, freedom of expression, and privacy. The project concludes that although companies have made meaningful efforts to improve, they have much more to do to respect users' rights and provide transparency.
https://rankingdigitalrights.org/2019/05/15/the-2019-rdr-index-is-now-online/

Considering platform regulation
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In this ebook, The Case for the Digital Platform Act, Harold Feld, senior vice president of Public Knowledge, sets out a proposed framework for regulating digital platforms, including competition, content moderation, consumer protections, and law enforcement. He recommends building a toolkit that includes provisions to ensure openness such as data portability, open APIs, interconnection rules, and mandatory fair and reasonable licensing for essential intellectual property; limits on size and vertical integration; and privacy by design. Feld also studies commonly-made proposals such as breaking up Facebook and Google and suggests principles to follow in creating content moderation and consumer protection regimes.
http://www.digitalplatformact.com/


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DIARY
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If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

AI for Good Global Summit
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May 28-31, 2019
Geneva, Switzerland
The AI for Good Global Summit is the leading United Nations platform for global and inclusive dialogue on artificial intelligence. The summit is hosted each year in Geneva by the International Telecommunications Union in partnership with UN sister agencies, the XPRIZE Foundation, and ACM.
https://aiforgood.itu.int/

Privacy Law Scholars 2019
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May 30-31, 2019
Berkeley, California, USA
Organized jointly by BCLT and the George Washington University Law School, PLSC assembles a wide array of privacy law scholars and practitioners from around the world to discuss current issues and foster greater connections between academia and practice.
https://www.law.berkeley.edu/research/bclt/bcltevents/2019annual-privacy-law-scholars-conference/

22nd International Conference on Electronic Publishing
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June 2-4, 2019
Marseille, France
In 2019, the Electronic Publishing conference will take as an inspirational starting point the concept of bibliodiversity, a term coined by Chilean publishers in the 1990s. The forum will revisit its definition and explore what it means today, five years after the 2014 adoption by 400 publishers from 45 countries of the International Declaration of Independent Publishers to Promote and Strengthen Bibliodiversity Together. This year's conference aims to bring together the inquiring minds of the academic, professional, and publishing industries to explore the ever-evolving nature of knowledge transmission within human societies.
https://elpub2019.sciencesconf.org/

WEIS 2019
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June 3-4, 2019
Boston, Massachusetts, USA
The Workshop on the Economics of Information Security is is the leading annual forum for interdisciplinary scholarship on information security and privacy, combining expertise from the fields of economics, social science, business, law, policy, and computer science.
https://weis2019.econinfosec.org/

19th TACD Public Forum
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June 4, 2019
Washington, DC, US
The theme of Transatlantic Consumer Dialogue's 19th public forum will be consumer protection in the public sphere.
http://tacd.org/events/19th-tacd-public-forum/

Data for Policy
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June 11-12, 2019
London, UK
The fourth international Data for Policy conference has "Digital Trust and Personal Data" as its main theme. The conference will also welcome contributions in the broader data science for government and policy discussions. In particular, the organizers encourage submissions around the value and harm of using data in the public sector, deployment experience in government, "digital ethics" and "ethics engineering" concepts, personal data sharing frameworks and technologies, transparency in machine learning processes, analytics at source, and secure data transaction methodologies.
http://dataforpolicy.org/

RightsCon 2019
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June 11-14, 2019
Tunis, Tunisia
RightsCon Tunis will continue to be a space for civil society, technologists, businesses, startups, public servants, and lawyers to connect, collaborate, build strategies, draft declarations, and move forward real-world change. Whether in provocative plenaries, intimate roundtables, informal meetings, or the lively Community Village, RightsCon Tunis will help shape the future of human rights in the digital age.
https://www.rightscon.org/about/

The Web That Was
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June 19-21, 2019
Amsterdam, Netherlands
As the first generation of web users ages, the early web has become simply another object of nostalgia. The third biennial Research Infrastructure for the Study of Archived Web Materials (RESAW) conference will rethink our relationship to the web's past and the past web, and consider how to reconstruct and re-evaluate its history. The conference will host a lecture-performance by Geert Lovink and guests on the history and preservation of Amsterdam's early internet culture.
https://thewebthatwas.net

Africa Data Protection and Privacy Conference
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June 24-28, 2019
Accra, Ghana
The first Africa Data Protection and Privacy Conference, convened by the Network of African Data Protection Authorities and Ghana Data Protection Commission, will bring together established authorities in Africa and their Global North counterparts for thought leadership, insight, best practice, high level strategic content, and networking, providing a critical platform for promoting Africa's drive for data protection and privacy laws in Africa.
https://www.ardppc.com/eng/

LIBER 2019
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June 26-28, 2019
Dublin, Ireland
The LIBER Conference 2019 will be held in collaboration with CONUL, the Consortium of National and University Libraries for the island of Ireland. The conference brings library directors and their staff together for three days of networking and collaboration. The goal of the conference is to identify the most pressing needs for research libraries, and to share information and ideas for addressing those needs.
https://liberconference.eu/dublin2019/

ORGCon
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July 13, 2019
London, UK
Themes for this year's ORGCon are digital privacy; free speech, censorship, and the role of algorithms; mass government surveillance; and data and democracy.
https://orgcon.openrightsgroup.org/2019/

PETS 2019
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July 16-20, 2019
Stockholm, Sweden
The 19th Privacy Enhancing Technologies Symposium will bring together privacy experts from around the world to present and discuss recent advances and new perspectives on research in privacy technologies. PETS/PoPETs is the premier venue for novel applied and/or theoretical research into the design, analysis, experimentation, or fielding of privacy-enhancing technologies.
https://petsymposium.org/

DEF CON 27
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August 8-11, 2018
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
DEF CON is one of the oldest continuously running hacker conventions, and also one of the largest. The DEF CON 27 theme, in a way, responds to '1983' with new questions. What does it look like when we make the better choice? What kind of world do we hack together in the sunniest timeline? How does our real best-case scenario compare to the future we've been dreaming of for generations?
https://defcon.org/index.html

SOUPS 2019
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August 11-13, 2019
Santa Clara, California, USA
The 2019 Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security (SOUPS) will bring together an interdisciplinary group of researchers and practitioners in human computer interaction, security, and privacy. The program will feature technical papers on aspects of privacy and security such as innovative functionality and design, field studies, usability evaluations of privacy features, and longitudinal studies.
https://www.usenix.org/conference/soups2019/call-for-papers

Wikimania
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August 14-18, 2019
Stockholm, Sweden
Wikimania 2019 will be the 15th Wikimania conference, an annual event for the international Wikimedia community.
https://wikimania.wikimedia.org/wiki/Main_Page

85th World Library and Information Congress
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August 24-30, 2019
Athens, Greece
The theme of IFLA's 2019 conference, "Libraries: dialogue for change", invites the library and information science international community to discuss, re-examine, re-think and re-interpret the role of libraries as promoters of change. In an era of rapid changes in the socio-economic-technological sphere, libraries ought to define their role as information providers, promoters of reading, settlers for the community they serve, key players in innovation, and leading actors for changes in society. A constant, open dialectic relationship between libraries and society will lead to well-informed citizens facilitating progress and development, implementing the UN Agenda for Sustainable Development and leading to prosperity in all fields of the democratic society.
https://2019.ifla.org/#news

Biometrics Congress
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October 28-30, 2019
London, UK
The Biometrics Institute Congress provides an independent platform where the international biometrics community can gather to conduct off-the-record discussion among the institute's multi-stakeholder community. In 2018, representatives from over 30 nations attended. This year's theme is making the world a safer place through the responsible and ethical use of biometrics in an era where laws and regulations are often unable to stay abreast of technology change and the business models based on it.
https://www.biometricsinstitute.org/event/biometrics-congress-2019/

Web Summit
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November 4-7. 2019
Lisbon, Portugal
The Web Summit gathers the founders and CEOs of technology companies, fast-growing startups, policymakers, and heads of state to ask a simple question: where to next? In 2018, speakers included Margrethe Vestager, Tim Berners-Lee, and Microsoft CEO Brad Smith.
https://websummit.com/

18th Workshop on Privacy in the Electronic Society
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November 11, 2019
London, UK
The goal of this workshop, held in conjunction with the ACM CCS conference, is to discuss and find solutions to the privacy problems that result from the transformation of society brought by the Information Revolution. One of the major implications of this technological shift has been a massive increase in the collection, sharing, and analysis of personal data. The workshop will include academia, government, and industry, as well as communities such as law and business, who will present novel research on all theoretical and practical aspects of electronic privacy, as well as experimental studies of fielded systems.
http://wpes.tech/

IGF Global
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November 25-29, 2019
Berlin, Germany
The Internet Governance Forum (IGF) was set up in 2006 as an open discussion platform of the United Nations for key legal, political, social and technical issues relating to the internet. IGF's multi-stakeholder model aims to ensure that all relevant societal groups are equally involved in preparations and implementation: governments, civil society, business, academia, international organizations, and the technical community. This is particularly of note in terms of representatives from developing and newly industrializing countries, which otherwise tend to be under-represented.
https://www.igf2019.berlin/

Munin Conference on Scholarly Publishing
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November 27-29, 2019
Tromsø, Norway
The Munin Conference is an annual conference on scholarly publishing and communication, primarily revolving around open access, open data and open science.
http://site.uit.no/muninconf/

CPDP 2020
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January 22-24, 2020
Brussels, Belgium
The 2020 edition of Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection has issued a call for panels in all areas related to technological privacy and data protection.
https://www.cpdpconferences.org/call-for-panels

FAT* 2020
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January 27-30, 2020
Barcelona, Spain
ACM FAT* is an annual conference dedicating to bringing together a diverse community to investigate and tackle issues in this emerging area. Topics of interest include the theory and practice of fair machine learning, measurement and auditing of deployed systems, users' experience of algorithms, and the ethical, moral, social, and policy implications of big data and ubiquitous intelligent systems.
https://fatconference.org/

Meeting of the Minds Annual Summit
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February 19-21, 2020
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Attending the Meeting of the Minds Annual Summit is an outstanding opportunity for anyone seeking cross-disciplinary strategies and partnerships that deliver scalable, transferable, and equitable solutions to urban neighborhoods.
https://meetingoftheminds.org/events/motm2020

We Robot 2020
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April 2-4, 2020
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
We Robot is an interdisciplinary conference on the legal and policy questions relating to robots. The increasing sophistication of robots and their widespread deployment everywhere - from the home, to hospitals, to public spaces, and even to the battlefield - disrupts existing legal regimes and requires new thinking on policy issues. The conference fosters conversations between the people designing, building, and deploying robots, and those who design or influence the legal and social structures in which robots will operate.
https://techlaw.uottawa.ca/werobot


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