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News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week ending 23 November 2018

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The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published on the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF.  Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

Current and former grantees featured in this issue: EDRi; Privacy International.

JOB POSTING
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EDRi seeks senior policy adviser
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European Digital Rights (EDRi) is looking for a talented and dedicated Senior Policy Adviser to join EDRi's team in Brussels. This is a unique opportunity to be part of a growing and well-respected NGO that is making a real difference in the defense and promotion of online rights and freedoms in Europe and beyond. The deadline to apply for this full-time, permanent position is 2 December 2018.
https://edri.org/job-alert-edri-is-looking-for-a-senior-policy-advisor/


NEWS
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US: Under fire, Facebook hired opposition research firm
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When Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and COO Sheryl Sandberg were confronted with evidence of Russian activity intended to disrupt the 2016 US presidential election, they passed on the responsibility and the blame to subordinates such as security chief Alex Stamos, the New York Times reports. Stamos reports that Facebook hired Defenders, a Republican opposition research firm that specializes in applying political campaign techniques to corporate PR, to attack and discredit activist protesters, in part by linking them to George Soros. Open Society Foundations president Patrick Gaspard has responded, calling out Facebook for not only failing to monitor hate and misinformation, but for actively promoting it. Separately, the BBC reports that false information circulating on Facebook is leading to killings in Nigeria's already-inflamed Plateau State.
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/14/technology/facebook-data-russia-election-racism.html
https://twitter.com/patrickgaspard/status/1062886458527309824/photo/1
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/resources/idt-sh/nigeria_fake_news

EU: Journalists are under threat in western democracies
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Journalists are under threat in many places they were formerly thought to be safe, finds a new report from Index on Censorship. Across the EU, journalists are being intimidated, harassed, assaulted, jailed, or killed, while political figures threaten and humiliate them, and governments spy on them. Italy had the most verified physical assaults, with 83.
https://mappingmediafreedom.org/index.php/demonising-media-threats-journalists-europe/

India: WhatsApp struggles to control fake news
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Research from the BBC World Service links Hindu nationalism and the falling cost of mobile services to a series of murders and growing anti-Muslim sentiment it says is fueled by messages shared on WhatsApp. Jim Waterson reports at the Guardian that WhatsApp poses two particular problems: information received from friends seems inherently more trustworthy, and encryption makes messages difficult to track. At the New York Times, Cristina Tardáguila, Fabrício Benevenuto, and Pablo Ortellado, based on their own research, find that WhatsApp is poisoning Brazilian politics.
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2018/nov/12/whatsapp-struggling-control-fake-news-india-bbc-study-hindu-nationalism-cheap-mobile-data
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/17/opinion/brazil-election-fake-news-whatsapp.html

Venezuela: Chinese telco ZTE helps build citizen monitoring system
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The Chinese telecommunications giant ZTE is helping Venezuela roll out a "fatherland" smart ID card, which the government is increasingly linking to health and other social programs most Venezuelans rely on, Angus Berwick reports for Reuters. ZTE's role is to build the centralized database that will hold comprehensive data collected on citizens via the fatherland card and create a linked mobile payment system. U.S. Senator Marco Rubio suggests that through the project China is "exporting its authoritarianism".
https://www.reuters.com/investigates/special-report/venezuela-zte/

Losing bidders reveal their bids to land Amazon's second U.S. headquarters
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Following Amazon's announcement that it would divide its second headquarters between New York City and Washington, DC and build a distribution hub in Nashville, losing bidders began disclosing the incentives they offered the company. Among the offers, Julia Carrie Wong reports at the Guardian, were $4.6 billion in financial assistance (Philadelphia), an exclusive airport lounge (Atlanta), and a downtown corporate hangar (Dallas).
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2018/nov/14/amazon-next-headquarters-losing-city-bids-what-offered

Kenya: M-Pesa mobile money expands globally
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A deal with Western Union will enable M-Pesa subscribers in ten nations across Africa, Europe, and Asia to transfer funds to and from bank accounts across the world, Abdi Latif Dahir reports at Quartz. The service, which Safaricom set up in 2007 to allow Kenyans to send each other small amounts of money via mobile phone text messages, has vastly expanded financial inclusion.
https://qz.com/africa/1453797/western-union-in-mobile-money-deal-with-safaricoms-mpesa/


FEATURES AND ANALYSIS
====================

French president Emmanuel Macron issues Paris Call for Trust and Stability of Cyberspace
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In this blog posting, Access Now explains why despite reservations it is endorsing the multi-stakeholder Paris Call for Trust and Stability of Cyberspace, which was launched by French president Emmanuel Macron at the Internet Governance Forum. Among Access Now's concerns: how cooperation in solving crimes and law enforcement protocols will be defined, and the failure to address government hacking. Access Now also notes that in conflict with the Paris Call, nine EU member states - Czech Republic, Cyprus, Estonia, Finland, Ireland, Italy, Poland, Sweden, and the UK - are attempting to block proposals to curb the export of surveillance technologies to abusive regimes, citing work by Privacy International that shows the extent of these exports.
https://www.accessnow.org/access-now-to-join-the-paris-call-for-trust-and-stability-in-cyberspace/
https://www.accessnow.org/eu-states-push-to-relax-rules-on-exporting-surveillance-technology-to-human-rights-abusers/

Scientists oppose Australian anti-transparency security legislation
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In this open letter to the Australian Joint Committee on Intelligence and Security, an international group of security experts critiques the pending Telecommunications Assistance and Access Bill 2018, which includes secrecy provisions that "could thwart efforts to implement new technical transparency systems necessary to the ongoing security of the Internet".
https://internetpolicy.mit.edu/pjcis-2018/l

Deepfakes researchers study detection and authentication
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In this lengthy article at the New Yorker, Joshua Rothman studies advances in digital imagery such as deepfakes and synthetic images, as well as improvements in authentication. At the Guardian, Oscar Schwartz discusses a Belgian case in which a faked video of US president Donald Trump caused outrage and discusses detection efforts. At Nieman Labs, the Wall Street Journal's Francesco Marconi outlines the paper's project to train reporters to identify images that have been altered using AI, complete with worked examples.
https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2018/11/12/in-the-age-of-ai-is-seeing-still-believing
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2018/nov/12/deep-fakes-fake-news-truth
http://www.niemanlab.org/2018/11/how-the-wall-street-journal-is-preparing-its-journalists-to-detect-deepfakes/

Why doctors hate their computers - but patients benefit
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In this article at the New Yorker, Atul Gawande, himself a physician, studies doctors' increasing loathing of their computers, which have greatly enlarged their administrative burden, are increasing burnout, and make them feel powerless. For patients, however, the systems are beginning to improve outcomes by giving them better information and enabling physicians to identify those who need more help.
https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2018/11/12/why-doctors-hate-their-computers

China: Social Credit system is less Orwellian than we think - for now
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In this article at Foreign Policy, Jamie Horsley dispels myths about China's Social Credit Score, which is less Orwellian than critics claim. While China is intensively collecting information on its citizens and Social Credit raises many serious concerns, the country is not yet assigning a single score that determines all aspects of every citizen's life. The essence of the system, Horsley writes, is legal compliance: meeting contractual commitments and social and economic obligations.
https://foreignpolicy.com/2018/11/16/chinas-orwellian-social-credit-score-isnt-real/


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DIARY
==============
If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

Munin Conference on Scholarly Publishing
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November 28, 2018
Tromso, Norway
The Munin Conference is an annual conference on scholarly publishing and communication, primarily revolving around open access, open data and open science. The 2018 conference will be the thirteenth edition.
https://site.uit.no/muninconf/

Digital Society Conference 2018
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December 10-11, 2018
Berlin, Germany
The Digital Society Conference 2018 - Empowering ecosystems will cover new developments in security and privacy, digital politics, and industrial strategies. A particular focus will be the reality of the rise of AI - its societal implications, how to understand and harness the battle for AI dominance. The conference will also take a closer look at platforms - their role, their power, how to build them and how and when to control them.
https://www.esmt.org/faculty-research/centers-chairs-and-institutes/digital-society-institute-dsi/dsi-events/digital-society-conference-2018-empowering-ecosystems

Future of Health Privacy Summit 2019
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January 28-29, 2019
Washington, DC, USA
The 8th International Summit on the Future of Health Privacy will feature keynote speakers Isabelle Falque-Pierrotin, President of the French data protection regulator, CNIL, and the former chair of the EU Article 29 Working Party during the time when it was responsible for developing the General Data Protection Regulation, and Don Rucker, the US National Coordinator for Health Information Technology. This year's summit will focus on the impact that GDPR and the Cambridge Analytica scandal will have on health care and technology around the world.
https://patientprivacyrights.org/2019hps/

Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection 2019
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January 30 - February 1, 2019
Brussels, Belgium
One of the world's leading privacy conferences, CPDP is a multi-disciplinary event that offers the cutting edge in legal, regulatory, academic, and technological development in privacy and data protection. Within an atmosphere of independence and mutual respect, CPDP gathers academics, lawyers, practitioners, policy-makers, industry and civil society from all over the world in Brussels, offering them an arena to exchange ideas and discuss the latest emerging issues and trends.
https://www.cpdpconferences.org/call-for-panels

Responsible Tech 2019
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January 31, 2019
London, UK
Doteveryone and other world-leading experts, practitioners, policymakers, funders and tech leaders will convene to consider how to respond to the "techlash" of 2018, and make 2019 the year the industry comes together to build a more positive future where responsible technology is the new normal.
https://doteveryone.org.uk/responsible-tech-2019/

FAT* 2019
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January 29-31, 2019
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
The second annual ACM FAT* Conference 2019 brings together researchers and practitioners interested in fairness, accountability, and transparency in socio-technical systems. ACM FAT* 2019 builds on the success of the inaugural 2018 conference, which was held in New York. The 2019 conference will be held in Atlanta, Georgia.
https://fatconference.org/2019/index.html

TicTec 2019
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March 19-20, 2019
Paris, France
TiCTeC 2019 will bring together individuals from academic and applied backgrounds as well as businesses, public authorities, NGOs, funders and education institutions to discuss ideas, present research and build a network of individuals interested in the civic technology landscape.
https://www.mysociety.org/2018/09/03/join-us-in-paris-for-tictec-2019/

Internet Freedom Festival 2019
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April 1-5, 2019
Valencia, Spain
The Internet Freedom Festival is one of the largest, most diverse, and most inclusive unconferences in the world. Every year, 1000+ activists, journalists, technologists and human rights defenders from over 100 countries gather for a week of sharing and learning. Made by the community for the community, the IFF is known for creating a positive and inclusive environment for hands-on, multidisciplinary collaboration. As an example of this, women make up 50% of participants and presenters, while every year some of the most affected communities get assistance to participate through IFF's well-known Diversity and Inclusion Fund.
https://internetfreedomfestival.org/

We Robot 2019
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April 11-13, 2019
Miami, Florida, US
We Robot is an interdisciplinary conference on the legal and policy questions relating to robots. The increasing sophistication of robots and their widespread deployment everywhere - from the home, to hospitals, to public spaces, and even to the battlefield - disrupts existing legal regimes and requires new thinking on policy issues. The conference fosters conversations between the people designing, building, and deploying robots, and the people who design or influence the legal and social structures in which robots will operate.
http://robots.law.miami.edu/2019/

Global Privacy Summit 2019
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May 2-3, 2019
Washington, DC
The annual conference of the International Association of Privacy Professionals. Intended for anyone who works in privacy anywhere across the globe, whether they work in the public or private sector.
https://iapp.org/conference/speak-at-an-iapp-conference/proposals/

re:publica 2019
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May 6-8, 2019
Berlin, Germany
The re:publica in Berlin is Europe's biggest conference on topics concerning digitization and society while also being one of the world's most exceptional festivals on digital culture. Since its beginnings in 2007 with 700 bloggers in attendance, it has grown into an international society conference. In 2017 it had 9,000 national and international participants from all areas of society.
https://re-publica.com/en

Privacy Law Scholars 2019
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May 23-24, 2019
Berkeley, California, USA
Organized jointly by BCLT and the George Washington University Law School, PLSC assembles a wide array of privacy law scholars and practitioners from around the world to discuss current issues and foster greater connections between academia and practice.
https://www.law.berkeley.edu/research/bclt/bcltevents/2019annual-privacy-law-scholars-conference/

RightsCon 2019
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June 11-14, 2019
Tunis, Tunisia
RightsCon Tunis will continue to be a space for civil society, technologists, businesses, startups, public servants, and lawyers to connect, collaborate, build strategies, draft declarations, and move forward real-world change. Whether in provocative plenaries, intimate roundtables, informal meetings, or the lively Community Village, RightsCon Tunis will help shape the future of human rights in the digital age.
https://www.rightscon.org/about/

The Web That Was
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June 19-21, 2019
Amsterdam, Netherlands
As the first generation of web users ages, the early web has become simply another object of nostalgia. The third biennial Research Infrastructure for the Study of Archived Web Materials (RESAW) conference will rethink our relationship to the web's past and the past web, and consider how to reconstruct and re-evaluate its history. The conference will host a lecture-performance by Geert Lovink and guests on the history and preservation of Amsterdam's early internet culture.
https://thewebthatwas.net

LIBER 2019
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June 26-28, 2019
Dublin, Ireland
The LIBER Conference 2019 will be held in collaboration with CONUL, the Consortium of National and University Libraries for the island of Ireland. The conference brings library directors and their staff together for three days of networking and collaboration. The goal of the conference is to identify the most pressing needs for research libraries, and to share information and ideas for addressing those needs.
https://liberconference.eu/dublin2019/

Wikimania
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August 14-18, 2019
Stockholm, Sweden
Wikimania 2019 will be the 15th Wikimania conference, an annual event for the international Wikimedia community.
https://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/Wikimania_2019_bids/Sweden

85th World Library and Information Congress
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August 24-30, 2019
Athens, Greece
The theme of IFLA's 2019 conference, "Libraries: dialogue for change", invites the library and information science international community to discuss, re-examine, re-think and re-interpret the role of libraries as promoters of change. In an era of rapid changes in the socio-economic-technological sphere, libraries ought to define their role as information providers, promoters of reading, settlers for the community they serve, key players in innovation, and leading actors for changes in society. A constant, open dialectic relationship between libraries and society will lead to well-informed citizens facilitating progress and development, implementing the UN Agenda for Sustainable Development and leading to prosperity in all fields of the democratic society.
https://2019.ifla.org/#news

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News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week ending 9 November 2018

====================================================
The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published on the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF.  Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

Current and former grantees featured in this issue: Citizen Lab; Tactical Tech.


NEWS
=====

Googlers stage worldwide walkout to demand structural change
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On November 2 at 11:10 AM an estimated 20,000 employees at nearly two-thirds of Google's offices walked out in protest against abuse of power, systemic racism and sexism, and unaccountable decision-making within the company, Richard Lawler reports at Endgadget. Among the protesters' demands: an end to forced arbitration in harassment cases and a commitment to end pay inequity. In an essay at The Cut, the organizers cite as the final straw a recent New York Times article in which Daisuke Wakabayashi and Katie Benner reported that the company paid Android creator Andy Rubin a $90 million severance package while keeping secret accusations against him of sexual misconduct.
https://www.engadget.com/2018/11/03/google-walkout-for-real-change/
https://www.thecut.com/2018/11/google-walkout-organizers-explain-demands.html
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/25/technology/google-sexual-harassment-andy-rubin.html

US: Government outsources immigration enforcement to Silicon Valley
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Amazon, Palantir, and Thomson Reuters play important roles in storing, transferring, and analyzing data on both undocumented residents and citizens on behalf of the US government, Sean Captain finds at Fast Company. A new report from the immigrant advocacy group Mijente documents the government's shift of discretion and power via contracts with these companies, especially Amazon Web Services. Mijente is concerned that implementing safeguards will become increasingly difficult as the companies obstruct accountability by claiming trade secrets and citing the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act. At the Daily Beast, Jake Laperruque and Andrea Peterson report that Amazon is also pitching its real-time facial recognition technology to Immigration and Customs Enforcement.
https://www.fastcompany.com/90255355/the-surveillance-state-is-outsourced-to-silicon-valley-says-report
https://mijente.net/notechforice/
https://www.thedailybeast.com/amazon-pushes-ice-to-buy-its-face-recognition-surveillance-tech

EU: Researchers target Elsevier in complaint to Competition Authority
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On behalf of a group of researchers who produce and publish scholarly articles, Jonathan Tennant (UK) and Björn Brembs (Germany) have filed a complaint with the EU Competition Authority regarding RELX/Elsevier and the wider scholarly publishing market, Gary Price reports for Library Journal. The researchers accuse Elsevier and its parent, the RELX Group, of abusing a dominant position within the scholarly publishing market, and argue that the market itself actively prohibits competition.
https://www.infodocket.com/2018/10/30/full-text-complaint-filed-with-eu-competition-authority-regarding-relx-and-the-wider-scholarly-publishing-market/

China exports digital surveillance to African governments
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Using a mix of official training, technological infrastructure provision, and demands that international companies adopt Chinese content regulations, China is exporting its digital surveillance methods to African governments, Abdi Latif Dahir reports at Quartz Africa. The article is based on a new study from the US-based think tank Freedom House, which finds that as internet freedom continues to decline globally, China remains its worst abuser, a problem that is becoming more urgent as the country deploys fiber optic networks across the developing world, and its largest technology companies expand internationally.
https://qz.com/africa/1447015/china-is-helping-african-countries-control-the-internet/
https://freedomhouse.org/report/freedom-net/freedom-net-2018/rise-digital-authoritarianism

Apple CEO Tim Cook blasts the "data industrial complex"
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In this article at the Washington Post, Tony Romm summarizes Apple CEO Tim Cook's keynote speech at the 40th International Conference of Data Protection and Privacy Commissioners and posts a full transcript. Cook denounced the privacy-abusive business model of Silicon Valley technology companies and the resulting "data industrial complex" and called for the US to implement a comprehensive federal privacy law similar to the EU's General Data Protection Regulation.
https://www.cnbc.com/2018/10/24/apples-tim-cook-warns-silicon-valley-it-would-be-destructive-to-block-strong-privacy-laws.html

EU: Border trials "smart lie-detection system"
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A "deception detection system" that claims to analyze the facial micro-expressions of immigrants seeking to enter the EU will be trialed at the border in Hungary, Greece, and Latvia, Daniel Boffey reports at the Guardian. The "lie detector" uses a personalized computer animation of a border guard to ask questions via a webcam. Academic critics have called the system "pseudoscience"; proponents say the lie detector is just one element of a series of risk analysis tools. Similar systems are being built in the US for law enforcement and border controls at the US-Mexico border. In Spain, Olivia Goldhill reports at Quartz, an AI tool claimed to be remarkably accurate at detecting written falsehoods is being rolled out to police stations.
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/nov/02/eu-border-lie-detection-system-criticised-as-pseudoscience
https://qz.com/1441034/using-artificial-intelligence-to-detect-written-lies/


FEATURES AND ANALYSIS
====================

Spyware's role in Jamal Khashoggi's murder
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In this video clip from CNN, Citizen Lab senior research fellow Bill Marczak and Saudi dissident Omar Abdulaziz discuss the role NSO Group's Pegasus spyware, which the company sells to governments and which was found on Abdulaziz's phone, played in the murder of Jamal Khashoggi. The spyware allows comprehensive surveillance of the target; Abdulaziz, who was a friend of Khashoggi's, was being monitored by this means. In light of this discovery, Citizen Lab has sent an open letter to Francisco Partners, believed to have a majority stake in NSO Group, asking the company to remedy failures of oversight and act to ensure that illegitimate uses of the software cease. The New York Times finds that the Saudi activities of consultancy firms like Booz Allen, McKinsey, and Boston Consulting Group are contributing to famine in Yemen and the crackdown on dissidents.
https://citizenlab.ca/2018/10/the-nso-connection-to-jamal-khashoggi/
https://citizenlab.ca/2018/11/open-letter-to-francisco-partners-continued-misuse-of-nso-groups-pegasus-technology/
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/04/world/middleeast/mckinsey-bcg-booz-allen-saudi-khashoggi.html

"Fauxtomation" undervalues humans by crediting AI for their work
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In this article at Logic, Astra Taylor, author of The People's Platform: Taking Back Power and Culture in the Digital Age, discusses "fauxtomation", the reality that a lot of what passes for AI relies on large amounts of low-paid human labor. Taylor regards automation as an ideology and a weapon against poor and working people, and argues that those hyping technology's capabilities are implanting the notion that we are disposable and ensuring that as much work as possible goes uncompensated. In a video clip from AI Now's recent symposium, Taylor presents further detail. At the BBC, Dave Lee finds that people in Kibera, Africa's largest slum, are paid to create training data for self-driving cars on behalf of the San Francisco-based company Samasource.
https://logicmag.io/05-the-automation-charade/
https://ainowinstitute.org/symposia/2018-symposium.html
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-46055595

Rethinking mobility from horseless carriages to self-driving cars
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In this podcast from their "A Secret History of the Future" series, The Economist's Tom Standage and Slate's Seth Stevenson ask what the early 20th century arrival of horseless carriages can teach us about navigating a future of autonomous vehicles. We will need to figure out what roads, transport, and cities will look like and who is responsible when things go wrong - and we have the chance to rethink the damaging choices we made then.
http://www.slate.com/articles/podcasts/secret_history_of_the_future/2018/09/from_horseless_carriages_to_autonomous_cars.html

Brazil: Personal data fuels electoral campaign advertising
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In this report, Tactical Tech studies the use of public and private data in the recent elections in Brazil, where until recently there has been little in the way of data protection legislation. Although Brazil's Federal Supreme Court declared in 2015 that corporate donations to electoral campaigns are unconstitutional, other changes in the law allow political parties, candidates, and party coalitions to advertise on all types of social media via sponsored ads, and personal voter data enables segmentation, targeting, and carefully directed propaganda. At Buzzfeed, Ryan Broderick reports that in the mid-October run-up to the general election, Folha, the country's biggest newspaper, uncovered the fact that local marketing companies were using purchased batches of phone numbers to mass-message voters anti-leftist propaganda on WhatsApp. It's unclear how Facebook can ban this practice without breaking the service's encryption.
https://ourdataourselves.tacticaltech.org/posts/overview-brazil/
https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/ryanhatesthis/facebook-announced-its-new-election-war-room-on-the-same

A proposal for new child labor laws for the digital age
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In this posting at Medium, Jordan Shapiro argues that we should pay children through taxes, dividends, or royalties to play video games and use social media in order to teach them the economic value of the work they do in extending, modifying, and adding content. Their labor becomes fuel for the artificial intelligence economic boom, which does not profit them. Without their contributions, the companies have no product.
https://medium.com/s/powertrip/we-need-new-child-labor-laws-for-the-digital-age-53606d873aad


***

DIARY
==============
If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

Meeting of the Minds Summit 2018
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November 27-29, 2018
Sacramento, CA, USA
The 12th annual Meeting of the Minds summit will spotlight tools and best practices working for smart city leaders across the globe. The event focuses on emerging and tested urban sustainability solutions which are scalable, replicable, and transferable for cities and regions. Discussions are rooted in a deep understanding of technology and equity as key drivers for smart cities.
https://meetingoftheminds.org/events/motm2018

Digital Society Conference 2018
----------------------------------------
December 10-11, 2018
Berlin, Germany
The Digital Society Conference 2018 - Empowering ecosystems will cover new developments in security and privacy, digital politics, and industrial strategies. A particular focus will be the reality of the rise of AI - its societal implications, how to understand and harness the battle for AI dominance. The conference will also take a closer look at platforms - their role, their power, how to build them and how and when to control them.
https://www.esmt.org/faculty-research/centers-chairs-and-institutes/digital-society-institute-dsi/dsi-events/digital-society-conference-2018-empowering-ecosystems

Munin Conference on Scholarly Publishing
----------------------------------------
November 28, 2018
Tromso, Norway
The Munin Conference is an annual conference on scholarly publishing and communication, primarily revolving around open access, open data and open science. The 2018 conference will be the thirteenth edition.
https://site.uit.no/muninconf/

Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection 2019
----------------------------------------
January 30 - February 1, 2019
Brussels, Belgium
One of the world's leading privacy conferences, CPDP is a multi-disciplinary event that offers the cutting edge in legal, regulatory, academic, and technological development in privacy and data protection. Within an atmosphere of independence and mutual respect, CPDP gathers academics, lawyers, practitioners, policy-makers, industry and civil society from all over the world in Brussels, offering them an arena to exchange ideas and discuss the latest emerging issues and trends.
https://www.cpdpconferences.org/call-for-panels

Future of Health Privacy Summit 2019
----------------------------------------
January 28-29, 2019
Washington, DC, USA
The 8th International Summit on the Future of Health Privacy will feature keynote speakers Isabelle Falque-Pierrotin, President of the French data protection regulator, CNIL, and the former chair of the EU Article 29 Working Party during the time when it was responsible for developing the General Data Protection Regulation, and Don Rucker, the US National Coordinator for Health Information Technology. This year's summit will focus on the impact that GDPR and the Cambridge Analytica scandal will have on health care and technology around the world.
https://patientprivacyrights.org/2019hps/

FAT* 2019
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January 29-31, 2019
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
The second annual ACM FAT* Conference 2019 brings together researchers and practitioners interested in fairness, accountability, and transparency in socio-technical systems. ACM FAT* 2019 builds on the success of the inaugural 2018 conference, which was held in New York. The 2019 conference will be held in Atlanta, Georgia.
https://fatconference.org/2019/index.html

TicTec 2019
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March 19-20, 2019
Paris, France
TiCTeC 2019 will bring together individuals from academic and applied backgrounds as well as businesses, public authorities, NGOs, funders and education institutions to discuss ideas, present research and build a network of individuals interested in the civic technology landscape.
https://www.mysociety.org/2018/09/03/join-us-in-paris-for-tictec-2019/

Internet Freedom Festival 2019
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April 1-5, 2019
Valencia, Spain
The Internet Freedom Festival is one of the largest, most diverse, and most inclusive unconferences in the world. Every year, 1000+ activists, journalists, technologists and human rights defenders from over 100 countries gather for a week of sharing and learning. Made by the community for the community, the IFF is known for creating a positive and inclusive environment for hands-on, multidisciplinary collaboration. As an example of this, women make up 50% of participants and presenters, while every year some of the most affected communities get assistance to participate through IFF's well-known Diversity and Inclusion Fund.
https://internetfreedomfestival.org/

We Robot 2019
----------------------------------------
April 11-13, 2019
Miami, Florida, US
We Robot is an interdisciplinary conference on the legal and policy questions relating to robots. The increasing sophistication of robots and their widespread deployment everywhere - from the home, to hospitals, to public spaces, and even to the battlefield - disrupts existing legal regimes and requires new thinking on policy issues. The conference fosters conversations between the people designing, building, and deploying robots, and the people who design or influence the legal and social structures in which robots will operate.
http://robots.law.miami.edu/2019/

Global Privacy Summit 2019
----------------------------------------
May 2-3, 2019
Washington, DC
The annual conference of the International Association of Privacy Professionals. Intended for anyone who works in privacy anywhere across the globe, whether they work in the public or private sector.
https://iapp.org/conference/speak-at-an-iapp-conference/proposals/

re:publica 2019
----------------------------------------
May 6-8, 2019
Berlin, Germany
The re:publica in Berlin is Europe's biggest conference on topics concerning digitization and society while also being one of the world's most exceptional festivals on digital culture. Since its beginnings in 2007 with 700 bloggers in attendance, it has grown into an international society conference. In 2017 it had 9,000 national and international participants from all areas of society.
https://re-publica.com/en

Privacy Law Scholars 2019
----------------------------------------
May 23-24, 2019
Berkeley, California, USA
Organized jointly by BCLT and the George Washington University Law School, PLSC assembles a wide array of privacy law scholars and practitioners from around the world to discuss current issues and foster greater connections between academia and practice.
https://www.law.berkeley.edu/research/bclt/bcltevents/2019annual-privacy-law-scholars-conference/

RightsCon 2019
----------------------------------------
June 11-14, 2019
Tunis, Tunisia
RightsCon Tunis will continue to be a space for civil society, technologists, businesses, startups, public servants, and lawyers to connect, collaborate, build strategies, draft declarations, and move forward real-world change. Whether in provocative plenaries, intimate roundtables, informal meetings, or the lively Community Village, RightsCon Tunis will help shape the future of human rights in the digital age.
https://www.rightscon.org/about/

LIBER 2019
----------------------------------------
June 26-28, 2019
Dublin, Ireland
The LIBER Conference 2019 will be held in collaboration with CONUL, the Consortium of National and University Libraries for the island of Ireland. The conference brings library directors and their staff together for three days of networking and collaboration. The goal of the conference is to identify the most pressing needs for research libraries, and to share information and ideas for addressing those needs.
https://liberconference.eu/dublin2019/

85th World Library and Information Congress
----------------------------------------
August 24-30, 2019
Athens, Greece
The theme of IFLA's 2019 conference, "Libraries: dialogue for change", invites the library and information science international community to discuss, re-examine, re-think and re-interpret the role of libraries as promoters of change. In an era of rapid changes in the socio-economic-technological sphere, libraries ought to define their role as information providers, promoters of reading, settlers for the community they serve, key players in innovation, and leading actors for changes in society. A constant, open dialectic relationship between libraries and society will lead to well-informed citizens facilitating progress and development, implementing the UN Agenda for Sustainable Development and leading to prosperity in all fields of the democratic society.
https://2019.ifla.org/#news


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News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week ending 26 October 2018
====================================================

The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published on the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF.  Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

Current and former grantees featured in this issue: EFF.


NEWS
=====

US: Political campaign apps bypass social media platform restrictions
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The American midterm elections are seeing the rise of conservative political apps designed to bypass the increasing restrictions on mainstream social media platforms such as Facebook and YouTube, report Natasha Singer and Nicholas Confessore at the New York Times. Many of these apps are developed by the Republican polling company WPA Intelligence and uCampaign, a DC start-up with connections to AggregateIQ, the small Canadian firm linked to the Cambridge Analytica scandal. Apps such as that of the National Rifle Association allow users to collect points, send campaign messages, and participate in other activities.
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/20/technology/politics-apps-conservative-republican.html

Saudi trolls harass Twitter critics and suppress dissent
----------------------------------------------------------------------
A Saudi troll farm mobilizes a small army to harass critics on Twitter, Katie Benner, Mark Mazzetti, Ben Hubbard and Mike Isaac report at the New York Times. Recruiting on Twitter, the kingdom's troll farm offers salaries of about $3,000 a month. Calling themselves the "Electronic Bees", these operatives send memes, report critical postings as "sensitive" so Twitter will mute them, and seek to distract users from dissent. Former Twitter engineer Ali Alzabarah may have been a mole; he now works with the Saudi government. Among the troll farm's targets was the late journalist Jamal Khashoggi, who likened the experience to "sustained gunfire online". Separately, Kara Swisher reports that Silicon Valley chief executives from companies such as Salesforce and 23andMe are increasingly considering hiring chief ethics officers. Besides the other complex problems they face, companies like Tesla, Magic Leap, WeWork, and Slack have received huge direct or indirect investments from Saudi Arabia's Public Investment Fund.
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/20/us/politics/saudi-image-campaign-twitter.html
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/21/opinion/who-will-teach-silicon-valley-to-be-ethical.html

California passes open access law
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The state of California has passed a law requiring that all peer-reviewed, state-funded scientific research must be made available to the public within a year after publication, Elliot Harmon reports at EFF. EFF recommended passing a stronger law requiring same-day open publication. A similar US federal law has been stuck in Congress for the last five years.
https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2018/10/open-access-law-california

The growth of ancestry sites threatens to expose anyone's identity
----------------------------------------------------------------------
A study published this week in Science suggests that DNA samples uploaded to ancestry websites by distant relatives can be cross-referenced to identify individuals, Ed Cara reports at Gizmodo. The study, which was inspired by the identification of the Golden State Killer via genealogy databases, estimates that once 2% of the population is in a database it becomes theoretically possible to identify anyone by tracing their distant relatives.
https://gizmodo.com/ancestry-sites-could-soon-expose-nearly-anyones-identit-1829685818

Microsoft open-sources its entire 60,000-patent portfolio
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Microsoft has agreed to grant a royalty-free and unrestricted license to all 60,000 patents in its portfolio to all other members of the Open invention Network (OIN), the open-source patent consortium it has recently joined, reports Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols at ZDNet. OIN's more than 2,540 members include Google, IBM, and Red Hat. Microsoft's patents include many relating to Android and the Linux kernel, as well as newer technologies such as HyperLedger.
https://www.zdnet.com/article/microsoft-open-sources-its-entire-patent-portfolio/

As the growth in internet access slows, women and the rural poor remain excluded
----------------------------------------------------------------------
New data shows that the worldwide growth of internet access has slowed from 19% in 2007 to 6% in 2017, leaving women and the rural poor a majority of the 3.8 billion who are excluded, the South China Morning Post reports based on an analysis of United National data that will be published next month by the Web Foundation. The UN Sustainable Development goal was affordable internet access for all by 2020; instead, it will be May 2019 before even half the world is online. As government services become increasingly digital those without access will become increasingly marginalized.
https://www.scmp.com/lifestyle/article/2169351/digital-revolution-slipping-further-away-billions-globes-poorest-data


FEATURES AND ANALYSIS
====================

The prospect of three internets
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article, the New York Times Editorial Board suggests that the internet may soon be split into three pieces by conflicting laws and regulations: US, China, and Europe. Data localization laws, data protection laws, technologically enforced censorship, the dependence on privately-owned infrastructure, and, especially, the lack of international cooperation all play a role in making the internet susceptible to splintering.
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/15/opinion/internet-google-china-balkanization.html

Why China may welcome Google's censored search engine
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article at the South China Morning Post, Bai Tongdong suggests that Americans opposed to Google's Dragonfly project to create a search engine acceptable to Chinese authorities might want to ask the opinions of Chinese people. Google's absence has allowed the growth of indigenous Chinese search engine Baidu, which Tongdong calls "frustrating", lacks tools like Google Books, and has commercialized its search results, leading to the proliferation of scams and gamed results that in some healthcare cases have cost people their lives, "A morally compromised Google is still better than Baidu," he writes.
https://www.scmp.com/comment/insight-opinion/united-states/article/2168337/china-even-censored-google-search-engine-would?stream=top

Wikipedia seeks knowledge equity
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting at the Oxford Internet Institute, Mark Graham and Martin Dittus examine the uneven geography of Wikipedia. Among their findings: Africa has 15% the number of articles that Europe does; Antarctica has more articles written about it than most countries in Africa and many in Latin America and Asia; and only 5% of articles written about Africa are written by local contributors. Wikipedia has formally committed to a strategy to counteract these inequalities, close the representation gap, and counteract systemic bias.
https://geography.oii.ox.ac.uk/the-uneven-geography-of-wikipedia/

The Gates Foundation provides a lesson in change management
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article at Nonprofit Quarterly, Martin Levine derives lessons from the recent state court ruling that found that the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation had mishandled hiring a new chief data officer. The position was created with insufficient agreement on what problem it was intended to solve, and the organization gave the new CDO, Todd Pierce, insufficient support to implement the level of organizational and cultural change he sought to implement. The court ordered the foundation to pay Pierce, who was fired after 17 months, nearly $5 million in lost salary, stock awards, and stock options. Mismanaging change is expensive - but change is nonetheless essential. At Inside Philanthropy, David Callahan argues that the reason the gains of modern liberalism are at risk is that where conservative funders have invested in ideas, institutions, and people over the long term to create fundamental change, liberal foundations have continued to try to solve problems one at a time while avoiding ideology.
https://nonprofitquarterly.org/2018/10/12/a-lesson-in-change-management-from-the-gates-foundation/
https://www.insidephilanthropy.com/home/2018/10/9/defeat-how-top-foundations-failed-to-stop-the-conservative-march-to-powerand-now-risk-losing-everything

Australian authors' groups oppose fair use
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this posting at BoingBoing, Cory Doctorow highlights the alliance between publishers and authors opposing Australia's proposed formalization of fair use. He points to the Author's Interest project, led by Australian copyright scholar Rebecca Giblin, which documents the divergence between authors' interests and those of their publishers. In the UK, she writes, professional writers' earnings dropped 42% in real terms between 2005 and 2017, the proposition able to make living solely from writing work dropped from 40% to 13.7% - while publishers' profits have risen.
https://boingboing.net/2018/10/21/lunch-money-for-bullies.html
https://authorsinterest.org/2018/10/18/fat-horses-starving-sparrows-on-bullshit-in-copyright-debates/

Archivists could play important role in countering deepfakes threat
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article at Gizmodo, Melanie Ehrenkranz suggests that archivists could be an important check on the potential for deepfakes - realistic fake videos - because they have centuries of experience dealing with forgeries and fakes and determining authenticity and provenance. At the Internet Archive, an important guiding principle is to keep many copies, and use robust techniques to ensure that the material libraries hold has not been changed. It's also crucial to document past errors and deceptions.
https://gizmodo.com/how-archivists-could-stop-deepfakes-from-rewriting-hist-1829666009


***

DIARY
==============
If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

Web Summit
----------------------------------------
November 5-8, 2018
Lisbon, Portugal
Web Summit began as a simple idea in 2010: to connect the technology community with all industries, both old and new. Since then, Web Summit has grown to become the largest technology conference in the world - it is expecting more than 59,000 entrepreneurs, investors, media, and others from 170 countries this year and will present more than 1,200 speakers.
https://websummit.com/

Meeting of the Minds Summit 2018
----------------------------------------
November 27-29, 2018
Sacramento, CA, USA
The 12th annual Meeting of the Minds summit will spotlight tools and best practices working for smart city leaders across the globe. The event focuses on emerging and tested urban sustainability solutions which are scalable, replicable, and transferable for cities and regions. Discussions are rooted in a deep understanding of technology and equity as key drivers for smart cities.
https://meetingoftheminds.org/events/motm2018

Digital Society Conference 2018
----------------------------------------
December 10-11, 2018
Berlin, Germany
The Digital Society Conference 2018 - Empowering ecosystems will cover new developments in security and privacy, digital politics, and industrial strategies. A particular focus will be the reality of the rise of AI - its societal implications, how to understand and harness the battle for AI dominance. The conference will also take a closer look at platforms - their role, their power, how to build them and how and when to control them.
https://www.esmt.org/faculty-research/centers-chairs-and-institutes/digital-society-institute-dsi/dsi-events/digital-society-conference-2018-empowering-ecosystems

Munin Conference on Scholarly Publishing
----------------------------------------
November 28, 2018
Tromso, Norway
The Munin Conference is an annual conference on scholarly publishing and communication, primarily revolving around open access, open data and open science. The 2018 conference will be the thirteenth edition.
https://site.uit.no/muninconf/

Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection 2019
----------------------------------------
January 30 - February 1, 2019
Brussels, Belgium
One of the world's leading privacy conferences, CPDP is a multi-disciplinary event that offers the cutting edge in legal, regulatory, academic, and technological development in privacy and data protection. Within an atmosphere of independence and mutual respect, CPDP gathers academics, lawyers, practitioners, policy-makers, industry and civil society from all over the world in Brussels, offering them an arena to exchange ideas and discuss the latest emerging issues and trends.
https://www.cpdpconferences.org/call-for-panels

Future of Health Privacy Summit 2019
----------------------------------------
January 28-29, 2019
Washington, DC, USA
The 8th International Summit on the Future of Health Privacy will feature keynote speakers Isabelle Falque-Pierrotin, President of the French data protection regulator, CNIL, and the former chair of the EU Article 29 Working Party during the time when it was responsible for developing the General Data Protection Regulation, and Don Rucker, the US National Coordinator for Health Information Technology. This year's summit will focus on the impact that GDPR and the Cambridge Analytica scandal will have on health care and technology around the world.
https://patientprivacyrights.org/2019hps/

FAT* 2019
----------------------------------------
January 29-31, 2019
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
The second annual ACM FAT* Conference 2019 brings together researchers and practitioners interested in fairness, accountability, and transparency in socio-technical systems. ACM FAT* 2019 builds on the success of the inaugural 2018 conference, which was held in New York. The 2019 conference will be held in Atlanta, Georgia.
https://fatconference.org/2019/index.html

TicTec 2019
----------------------------------------
March 19-20, 2019
Paris, France
TiCTeC 2019 will bring together individuals from academic and applied backgrounds as well as businesses, public authorities, NGOs, funders and education institutions to discuss ideas, present research and build a network of individuals interested in the civic technology landscape.
https://www.mysociety.org/2018/09/03/join-us-in-paris-for-tictec-2019/

Internet Freedom Festival 2019
----------------------------------------
April 1-5, 2019
Valencia, Spain
The Internet Freedom Festival is one of the largest, most diverse, and most inclusive unconferences in the world. Every year, 1000+ activists, journalists, technologists and human rights defenders from over 100 countries gather for a week of sharing and learning. Made by the community for the community, the IFF is known for creating a positive and inclusive environment for hands-on, multidisciplinary collaboration. As an example of this, women make up 50% of participants and presenters, while every year some of the most affected communities get assistance to participate through IFF's well-known Diversity and Inclusion Fund.
https://internetfreedomfestival.org/

We Robot 2019
----------------------------------------
April 11-13, 2019
Miami, Florida, US
We Robot is an interdisciplinary conference on the legal and policy questions relating to robots. The increasing sophistication of robots and their widespread deployment everywhere - from the home, to hospitals, to public spaces, and even to the battlefield - disrupts existing legal regimes and requires new thinking on policy issues. The conference fosters conversations between the people designing, building, and deploying robots, and the people who design or influence the legal and social structures in which robots will operate.
http://robots.law.miami.edu/2019/

Global Privacy Summit 2019
----------------------------------------
May 2-3. 2019
Washington, DC
The annual conference of the International Association of Privacy Professionals. Intended for anyone who works in privacy anywhere across the globe, whether they work in the public or private sector.
https://iapp.org/conference/speak-at-an-iapp-conference/proposals/

re:publica 2019
----------------------------------------
May 6-8, 2019
Berlin, Germany
The re:publica in Berlin is Europe's biggest conference on topics concerning digitization and society while also being one of the world's most exceptional festivals on digital culture. Since its beginnings in 2007 with 700 bloggers in attendance, it has grown into an international society conference. In 2017 it had 9,000 national and international participants from all areas of society.
https://re-publica.com/en

Privacy Law Scholars 2019
----------------------------------------
May 23-24, 2019
Berkeley, California, USA
Organized jointly by BCLT and the George Washington University Law School, PLSC assembles a wide array of privacy law scholars and practitioners from around the world to discuss current issues and foster greater connections between academia and practice.
https://www.law.berkeley.edu/research/bclt/bcltevents/2019annual-privacy-law-scholars-conference/

RightsCon 2019
----------------------------------------
June 11-14, 2019
Tunis, Tunisia
RightsCon Tunis will continue to be a space for civil society, technologists, businesses, startups, public servants, and lawyers to connect, collaborate, build strategies, draft declarations, and move forward real-world change. Whether in provocative plenaries, intimate roundtables, informal meetings, or the lively Community Village, RightsCon Tunis will help shape the future of human rights in the digital age.
https://www.rightscon.org/about/

LIBER 2019
----------------------------------------
June 26-28, 2019
Dublin, Ireland
The LIBER Conference 2019 will be held in collaboration with CONUL, the Consortium of National and University Libraries for the island of Ireland. The conference brings library directors and their staff together for three days of networking and collaboration. The goal of the conference is to identify the most pressing needs for research libraries, and to share information and ideas for addressing those needs.
https://liberconference.eu/dublin2019/

85th World Library and Information Congress
----------------------------------------
August 24-30, 2019
Athens, Greece
The theme of IFLA's 2019 conference, "Libraries: dialogue for change", invites the library and information science international community to discuss, re-examine, re-think and re-interpret the role of libraries as promoters of change. In an era of rapid changes in the socio-economic-technological sphere, libraries ought to define their role as information providers, promoters of reading, settlers for the community they serve, key players in innovation, and leading actors for changes in society. A constant, open dialectic relationship between libraries and society will lead to well-informed citizens facilitating progress and development, implementing the UN Agenda for Sustainable Development and leading to prosperity in all fields of the democratic society.
https://2019.ifla.org/#news


***

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News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week ending 12 October 2018

====================================================
The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published on the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF.  Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

Current and former grantees featured in this issue: CitizenLab; IP Watch; National Federation of the Blind; Privacy International; Simon Fraser University.


NEWS
=====

India: Supreme Court rules on Aadhaar
----------------------------------------------------------------------
India's Supreme Court has ruled 4-1 in favor of approving the use of the Aadhaar identification program for purposes relating to public funds, such as collecting taxes and distributing benefits, Vinda Goel reports at the New York Times. However, the court set limits on Aadhaar's use for other purposes, including national security and verifying students' identity when taking exams, and also struck down a provision in the 2016 Aadhaar Act that permitted use by private companies, including banks and mobile network operators.
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/26/technology/india-id-aadhaar-supreme-court.html

UK intelligence agencies surveilled Privacy International
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The UK intelligence service MI5 has admitted that it captured and read Privacy International's private data as part of its programs to collect bulk communications data and bulk personal data sets. As part of PI's pending Investigatory Powers Tribunal challenge to these programs MI5, MI6, and GCHQ all admitted that they unlawfully gathered data about PI or its staff. In response, PI has written to Home Secretary Sajid Javid to ask him to provide additional safeguards and oversight to protect charities operating in the public interest from unlawful surveillance by the UK intelligence agencies, as well as confirm the changes he will make to the Investigatory Powers Act given the recent European Court of Human Rights ruling that parts of it violate human rights law..
https://privacyinternational.org/press-release/2283/press-release-uk-intelligence-agency-admits-unlawfully-spying-privacy
https://privacyinternational.org/feature/2286/we-ask-home-secretary-why-uk-intelligence-agencies-have-unlawfully-analysed-pis-data

US-Mexico-Canada Agreement threatens privacy regulation
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA), which replaces NAFTA, sets troubling new standards for ecommerce that risk proliferating around the globe, blogs Canadian legal scholar Michael Geist. The digital trade chapter included in USMCA will lock in rules that restrict privacy safeguards and hinder efforts to establish new regulation for the digital world. Some provisions foster greater certainty for online trade; however, others restrict data localization policies, are vague on network neutrality, and ban restrictions on cross-border data transfers, in direct conflict with the EU's approach to data protection.
http://www.michaelgeist.ca/2018/10/setting-the-standard-how-the-usmca-quietly-reshapes-global-digital-trade-agreements/

Google shutters Google+ after disclosure of data breach
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Google will shut down its seven-year-old social networking effort Google+ after the Wall Street Journal reported that for six months the company has kept secret a bug it discovered in the Google+ application programming interface (API) that allowed third-party app developers to access the data of not only users who had granted permission but also of their friends. As Julia Carrie Wong and Olivia Solon report in the Guardian, this is the same scenario that helped Cambridge Analytica collect data on millions of Facebook users.
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2018/oct/08/google-plus-security-breach-wall-street-journal

US legislature passes the Marrakesh Treaty Implementation Act
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Both the US House of Representatives and the US Senate have now passed the Marrakesh Treaty Implementation Act, the National Federation of the Blind reports. The votes bring US copyright law into compliance with the Marrakesh Treaty to Facilitate Access to Published Works for Persons Who Are Blind, Visually Impaired or Otherwise Print Disabled. The legislation now awaits the signature of President Donald Trump. Also this week, the EU and its 28 member states formally acceded to the treaty, reports IP Watch, increasing the full number of treaty members to 70 countries
https://nfb.org/us-house-representatives-passes-marrakesh-treaty-implementation-act
http://www.ip-watch.org/2018/10/01/eu-joins-wipo-marrakesh-treaty-visually-impaired-boosts-available-books/

EU publishes code of practice on disinformation
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The European Union has published a self-regulatory Code of Practice on Disinformation (aka "fake news"), which has been agreed by representatives of online platforms, leading social networks, advertisers, and the advertising industry. The Code commits signatories to improve transparency, close fake accounts, and demonetize the purveyors of disinformation. According to Euractiv, the list of signatories includes Google, Facebook, and Mozilla.
https://ec.europa.eu/digital-single-market/en/news/code-practice-disinformation
https://www.euractiv.com/section/digital/news/disinformation-crackdown-tech-giants-commit-to-eu-code-of-practice/


FEATURES AND ANALYSIS
====================

Universities undervalue public engagement
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article at Nature, Chris Woolton discusses a study from Simon Fraser University that finds that although universities talk about their public mission, their guidelines for promotion and tenure put little value on public engagement. Based on an examination of 864 documents covering a wide variety of disciplines at 129 universities in the US and Canada, the researchers found a heavy emphasis on publications and citations, and few references to public outreach. At the Chronicle of Higher Education Audrey Williams Juen provides more detail on the study's findings, including the fact that only 5% of institutions explicitly mention open access in their guidelines for tenure and promotion.
https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-06906-z
https://www.chronicle.com/article/Do-Universities-Value-Public/244748

Five Eyes statement on encryption lacks backing by security and intelligence agencies
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this posting at Lawfare, privacy expert Susan Landau analyzes the statement on encryption issued in September by law enforcement in the "Five Eyes" countries (Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and the United States) and concludes it's less significant than it first seemed. While the statement is a strongly-worded demand for lawful access to decrypted versions of content, Landau notes that it is not signed by the defense and security agencies, which understand the operational security issues raised by weakening encryption.
https://www.lawfareblog.com/five-eyes-statement-encryption-things-are-seldom-what-they-seem

Did Chinese government agencies infiltrate Super Micro servers?
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article at The Register, Kieren McCarthy analyzes the explosive Bloomberg story that for three years Chinese government agencies have had access to highly sensitive data via spy chips they infiltrated into Super Micro Servers used by organizations including Amazon, Apple, and the US government. Apple, Amazon, and San Jose-based Super Micro have all strongly denied the story with a specificity McCarthy finds compelling. The bigger issue, McCarthy writes, is not these specific chips but the overall security of the supply chain, given that most chips are manufactured in China and Taiwan.
https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/10/04/supermicro_bloomberg/

Open-source investigation is changing intelligence and conflict monitoring
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article at Foreign Policy, Nick Waters explores open-source intelligence - the use by intelligence agencies and law enforcement of publicly available information such as social media postings and other reservoirs of online data. While such sources were recently disparaged by British MP Emily Thornberry, Waters finds that this type of information can be readily authenticated. For example, the time, date, and location of photographs can be verified and geolocated by matching shadows, historical weather data, daily satellite imagery, and the rate of building constructions. Waters goes on to discuss specific examples in Syria and Libya.
https://foreignpolicy.com/2018/09/25/google-maps-is-a-better-spy-than-james-bond/

Technologists and engineers query the social costs of what they're building
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article at the New York Times, Kate Conger and Cade Metz report that employees in the large technology companies are beginning to demand greater insight into how their employers are using their work. In particular, they increasingly want to know about the social costs of what they're doing - for example, whether they're working on technologies that will feed into surveillance in China or the military around the world. Executives have typically responded that full transparency is not possible. At Vox, Jennifer Pahika finds that the separation of families at the US border has been exacerbated by the limitations of the software border agents are using. Software, she finds, is policy.
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/07/technology/tech-workers-ask-censorship-surveillance.html
https://www.vox.com/first-person/2018/9/26/17902262/border-family-separation-policy-reunification-software

Canada: automated decision-making creates new risks for immigrants and refugees
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this report, Citizen Lab, IT3 Lab, and the International Human Rights program at the University of Toronto, examine the use of automated decision-making in Canada's immigration and refugee system, warning that the use of these technologies is creating a "laboratory for high-risk experiments within an already highly discretionary system". For at-risk groups with few resources to defend their rights, these systems are new vectors for bias, prejudice, privacy breaches, procedural unfairness, and a lack of due process.
https://ihrp.law.utoronto.ca/sites/default/files/media/IHRP-Automated-Systems-Report-Web.pdf


***

DIARY
==============
If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

International Conference of Data Protection and Privacy Commissioners
----------------------------------------
October 22-26, 2018
Brussels, Belgium
The 40th version of this event will be hosted by the European Data Protection Supervisor (EDPS), Giovanni Buttarelli and the chair of the Commission for Personal Data Protection of the Republic of Bulgaria, Ventsislav Karadjov. The conference is expected to focus on the recently launched international debate on the ethical dimension of data protection in the digital era. Accompanying conference events will also take place in Bulgaria.
https://icdppc.org/

Mozilla Festival
----------------------------------------
October 22-26, 2018
London, UK
Each year, MozFest features talks from luminaries at the intersection of technology and society, including hackers, journalists, activists, and others in a seven-day celebration for, by, and about people who love the internet, showcasing world-changing ideas and technology through workshops, talks, and interactive sessions.
https://mozillafestival.org/

Web Summit
----------------------------------------
November 5-8, 2018
Lisbon, Portugal
Web Summit began as a simple idea in 2010: to connect the technology community with all industries, both old and new. Since then, Web Summit has grown to become the largest technology conference in the world - it is expecting more than 59,000 entrepreneurs, investors, media, and others from 170 countries this year and will present more than 1,200 speakers.
https://websummit.com/

Meeting of the Minds Summit 2018
----------------------------------------
November 27-29, 2018
Sacramento, CA, USA
The 12th annual Meeting of the Minds summit will spotlight tools and best practices working for smart city leaders across the globe. The event focuses on emerging and tested urban sustainability solutions which are scalable, replicable, and transferable for cities and regions. Discussions are rooted in a deep understanding of technology and equity as key drivers for smart cities.
https://meetingoftheminds.org/events/motm2018

Munin Conference on Scholarly Publishing
----------------------------------------
November 28, 2018
Tromso, Norway
The Munin Conference is an annual conference on scholarly publishing and communication, primarily revolving around open access, open data and open science. The 2018 conference will be the thirteenth edition.
https://site.uit.no/muninconf/

Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection 2019
----------------------------------------
January 30 - February 1, 2019
Brussels, Belgium
One of the world's leading privacy conferences, CPDP is a multi-disciplinary event that offers the cutting edge in legal, regulatory, academic, and technological development in privacy and data protection. Within an atmosphere of independence and mutual respect, CPDP gathers academics, lawyers, practitioners, policy-makers, industry and civil society from all over the world in Brussels, offering them an arena to exchange ideas and discuss the latest emerging issues and trends.
https://www.cpdpconferences.org/call-for-panels

Future of Health Privacy Summit 2019
----------------------------------------
January 28-29, 2019
Washington, DC, USA
The 8th International Summit on the Future of Health Privacy will feature keynote speakers Isabelle Falque-Pierrotin, President of the French data protection regulator, CNIL, and the former chair of the EU Article 29 Working Party during the time when it was responsible for developing the General Data Protection Regulation, and Don Rucker, the US National Coordinator for Health Information Technology. This year's summit will focus on the impact that GDPR and the Cambridge Analytica scandal will have on health care and technology around the world.
https://patientprivacyrights.org/2019hps/

FAT* 2019
----------------------------------------
January 29-31, 2019
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
The second annual ACM FAT* Conference 2019 brings together researchers and practitioners interested in fairness, accountability, and transparency in socio-technical systems. ACM FAT* 2019 builds on the success of the inaugural 2018 conference, which was held in New York. The 2019 conference will be held in Atlanta, Georgia.
https://fatconference.org/2019/index.html

TicTec 2019
----------------------------------------
March 19-20, 2019
Paris, France
TiCTeC 2019 will bring together individuals from academic and applied backgrounds as well as businesses, public authorities, NGOs, funders and education institutions to discuss ideas, present research and build a network of individuals interested in the civic technology landscape.
https://www.mysociety.org/2018/09/03/join-us-in-paris-for-tictec-2019/

Internet Freedom Festival 2019
----------------------------------------
April 1-5, 2019
Valencia, Spain
The Internet Freedom Festival is one of the largest, most diverse, and most inclusive unconferences in the world. Every year, 1000+ activists, journalists, technologists and human rights defenders from over 100 countries gather for a week of sharing and learning. Made by the community for the community, the IFF is known for creating a positive and inclusive environment for hands-on, multidisciplinary collaboration. As an example of this, women make up 50% of participants and presenters, while every year some of the most affected communities get assistance to participate through IFFís well-known Diversity and Inclusion Fund.
https://internetfreedomfestival.org/

We Robot 2019
----------------------------------------
April 11-13, 2019
Miami, Florida, US
We Robot is an interdisciplinary conference on the legal and policy questions relating to robots. The increasing sophistication of robots and their widespread deployment everywhere - from the home, to hospitals, to public spaces, and even to the battlefield - disrupts existing legal regimes and requires new thinking on policy issues. The conference fosters conversations between the people designing, building, and deploying robots, and the people who design or influence the legal and social structures in which robots will operate.
http://robots.law.miami.edu/2019/

Global Privacy Summit 2019
----------------------------------------
May 2-3, 2019
Washington, DC
The annual conference of the International Association of Privacy Professionals. Intended for anyone who works in privacy anywhere across the globe, whether they work in the public or private sector.
http://bit.ly/2tNnJbP

re:publica 2019
----------------------------------------
May 6-8, 2019
Berlin, Germany
The re:publica in Berlin is Europe's biggest conference on topics concerning digitization and society while also being one of the world's most exceptional festivals on digital culture. Since its beginnings in 2007 with 700 bloggers in attendance, it has grown into an international society conference. In 2017 it had 9,000 national and international participants from all areas of society.
https://re-publica.com/en

Privacy Law Scholars 2019
----------------------------------------
May 23-24, 2019
Berkeley, California, USA
Organized jointly by BCLT and the George Washington University Law School, PLSC assembles a wide array of privacy law scholars and practitioners from around the world to discuss current issues and foster greater connections between academia and practice.
https://www.law.berkeley.edu/research/bclt/bcltevents/2019annual-privacy-law-scholars-conference/

RightsCon 2019
----------------------------------------
June 11-14, 2019
Tunis, Tunisia
RightsCon Tunis will continue to be a space for civil society, technologists, businesses, startups, public servants, and lawyers to connect, collaborate, build strategies, draft declarations, and move forward real-world change. Whether in provocative plenaries, intimate roundtables, informal meetings, or the lively Community Village, RightsCon Tunis will help shape the future of human rights in the digital age.
https://www.rightscon.org/about/

LIBER 2019
----------------------------------------
June 26-28, 2019
Dublin, Ireland
The LIBER Conference 2019 will be held in collaboration with CONUL, the Consortium of National and University Libraries for the island of Ireland. The conference brings library directors and their staff together for three days of networking and collaboration. The goal of the conference is to identify the most pressing needs for research libraries, and to share information and ideas for addressing those needs.
https://liberconference.eu/dublin2019/

85th World Library and Information Congress
----------------------------------------
August 24-30, 2019
Athens, Greece
The theme of IFLA's 2019 conference, "Libraries: dialogue for change", invites the library and information science international community to discuss, re-examine, re-think and re-interpret the role of libraries as promoters of change. In an era of rapid changes in the socio-economic-technological sphere, libraries ought to define their role as information providers, promoters of reading, settlers for the community they serve, key players in innovation, and leading actors for changes in society. A constant, open dialectic relationship between libraries and society will lead to well-informed citizens facilitating progress and development, implementing the UN Agenda for Sustainable Development and leading to prosperity in all fields of the democratic society.
https://2019.ifla.org/#news


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News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week ending 28 September 2018

====================================================
The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published on the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF.  Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

Current and former grantees featured in this issue: Cardiff Data Justice Lab, EDRi, Open Rights Group, Paywall, Privacy International, R3D.

NEWS
=====

European Parliament votes for "catastrophic" copyright directive
----------------------------------------------------------------------
At The Verge, James Vincent reports that on September 12 the European Parliament voted 438-226 in favor of the Copyright Directive, which was rejected for fast-tracking in July. Of particular concern to critics are Articles 11 (the "link tax") and 13 (the "upload filter"). Article 11 is intended to give publishers the right to demand paid licenses from those who, like Google, link to their stories; Article 13 requires platforms like YouTube and Facebook to block users from sharing copyrighted material. There will be a final vote in January 2019. EDRi predicts that if passed into law this proposal, which regulates all companies as if they were Google and Facebook, will mean a European internet where only Facebook and Google can survive.
https://www.theverge.com/2018/9/12/17849868/eu-internet-copyright-reform-article-11-13-approved
https://edri.org/press-release-eu-parliament-flip-flops-backwards-on-copyright/

European Court of Human Rights rules UK bulk interception illegal
----------------------------------------------------------------------
At the Guardian, Owen Bowcott reports that the European Court of Human Rights has ruled five votes to two that the UK security agency GCHQ's interception of bulk communications violated Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights. However, ECHR also found that GCHQ did not act illegally in sharing digital intelligence with foreign governments, and confirmed that given tighter safeguards bulk interception would be allowed under the law. The case was brought by a group of 14 human rights and privacy NGOs led by Privacy International, which filed its original complaint with the UK Investigatory Powers Tribunal in 2013. Other complainants included Open Rights Group, Big Brother Watch, and the Bureau of Investigative Journalism. In its analysis, Privacy International says the judgment has immediate implications for the UK's 2016 Investigatory Powers Act, which must now be revised to provide stronger oversight of GCHQ's activities tapping undersea cables and searching the communications gathered from them, and for the agency's use of metadata.
https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2018/sep/13/gchq-data-collection-violated-human-rights-strasbourg-court-rules
https://privacyinternational.org/feature/2267/uk-mass-interception-law-violates-human-rights-fight-against-mass-surveillance

Israel-based NSO Group accused of actively aiding illegal spying
----------------------------------------------------------------------
At the New York Times, David D. Kirkpatrick and Azam Ahmed report on two ongoing lawsuits against Israel-based NSO Group. Leaked NSO emails submitted in court show that the company, one of the best-known creators of smartphone spyware, sought to prove its technology works by sending top Emirati officials sample recordings from the phone of Abdulaziz Alkhamis, the editor of a London-based Arab newspaper. NSO's software has been sold to the governments of Mexico, Panama, and UAE, which have used it to spy on foreign government officials, human rights activists, and journalists. The software, known as "Pegasus", sends phishing texts to a target's smartphone; clicking on them secretly downloads the software. The Associated Press reports that the plaintiffs are five Mexican journalists and activists, who are being advised by the advocacy group R3D, and Qatari newspaper editor Abdullah Al-Athbah.
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/31/world/middleeast/hacking-united-arab-emirates-nso-group.html
https://apnews.com/a5d4f292925348ceaf64f649b4f79a0f

European research funders mandate open access by 2020
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In Nature, Holly Else reports that eleven European research funders have announced the radical open-access "Plan S", which from 2020 will require all the scientific work they fund to be made freely available to download, translate, or reuse as soon as it is published. The agencies jointly spend €7.6 billion in research grants annually. Holding out from joining the initiative are the national research agencies of Switzerland, Sweden, and Germany.
https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-06178-7

Interactive fitness data tracking spreads in UK, US, and South Africa
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Reuters reports that the 156-year-old US life insurance company John Hancock will stop underwriting traditional life insurance policies, instead selling only interactive policies that track health and fitness through the data collected by wearable devices and smartphones. Interactive life insurance is already well-established in South Africa and Britain, and is spreading in the US. While the company argues that the change will promote both health and profits, privacy and consumer advocates suggest the data may help insurers cherry-pick the most profitable customers (for further context see this panel from Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection 2017 on YouTube, which discusses the future of insurance in a big data world).
https://venturebeat.com/2018/09/19/john-hancock-will-require-fitness-tracking-for-all-life-insurance-policies/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gx910bkfsrU

Facebook amplifies Libyan conflict
----------------------------------------------------------------------
At the New York Times, Declan Walsh and Suliman Ali Zway report that Facebook has acted as a "force multiplier" in recent fighting between rival militias in the Libyan capital of Tripoli, enabling armed groups to target bombs and find opponents and critics. The company claims it is actively policing its Libyan platform with teams of Arabic-speaking content reviewers and AI with assistance from local organizations and international human rights groups. Nonetheless, the newspaper found evidence of open trading of military-grade weapons, and pages maintained by human traffickers and armed groups. For many people, stranded in their homes, Facebook is their only contact with the outside world. At MIT Technology Review, Zeynep Tufecki analyzes how social media has enabled authoritarians to master the internet.
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/04/world/middleeast/libya-facebook.html
https://www.technologyreview.com/s/611806/how-social-media-took-us-from-tahrir-square-to-donald-trump/


FEATURES AND ANALYSIS
====================

US technology companies help India create surveillance state
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article at the Huffington Post, Paul Blumenthal and Gopal Sathe await the Supreme Court of India ruling on the case against the Aadhaar biometric identification system by discussing the role of US technology in building India's "perfect surveillance state". Blumenthal suggests the nine-year-old Aadhaar program, which collects the fingerprints, iris scans, and photos of nearly 1.3 billion Indians, is a "gold mine" for companies like Microsoft, Amazon, and Facebook. Bill Gates is funding a World Bank program to copy Aadhaar in other countries; Microsoft has integrated it into Skype; Amazon uses it to trace missing packages; Facebook favors Aadhaar-verified names; and Google has "inadvertently" added the Aadhaar helpline to Android phones without informing users.
https://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/india-aadhuar-tech-companies_us_5b7ebc53e4b0729515109fd0

Paywall: the movie
----------------------------------------------------------------------
At Inside Higher Ed, Lindsay McKenzie reviews the documentary film Paywall, which outlines the dispute between open access advocates and journal publishers. McKenzie notes that few of the 70 people interviewed for the film work for publishers of subscription journals, but calls it a reflection of the growing power of the open access movement. The movie is freely available for download on the web. At BoingBoing, the film's creator Jason Schmitt outlines his research for the film, which includes a rare interview with Sci-Hub creator Alexandra Elbakyan.
https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2018/09/10/open-access-movement-hits-silver-screen
https://paywallthemovie.com/
https://boingboing.net/2018/09/18/why-for-profit-academic-publis.html

Palantir sponsorship causes withdrawals from APC 2018
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this posting, Datactive and the Data Justice Lab explain why they have decided to withdraw from participating in the 2018 Amsterdam Privacy Conference even though both enthusiastically supported the "Digital Society and Surveillance" theme. Their complaint is the conference's acceptance of sponsorship from the US-based company Palantir, which develops big data analytics technologies for the military, law enforcement, and border control and whose work has attracted widespread concern from civil liberties and human rights advocates. At Motherboard, J. M. Porup discusses the controversy, which began when activist Aral Balkan posted a protest to Twitter. At Medium, Sidney Vollmer argues that privacy conferences lose their credibility by accepting sponsorship from Palantir, Facebook, and Google.
https://data-activism.net/2018/09/why-we-wont-be-at-apc-2018/
https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/aekw4b/people-are-mad-that-facebook-and-google-sponsored-a-privacy-event
https://medium.com/@sidneyvollmer/thoughts-on-privacyweek-sponsored-by-facebook-co-bcd7c830f68c

Solving the #MeToo drain of dedicated workers from non-profits
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article at The Chronicles of Philanthropy, Sarah Schacht discusses #MeToo as it applies to non-profits: dedicated workers are leaving. As the young founder of open government technology organisation Knowledge As Power, reporting attempted rape by a prominent man in her specialty area led her to feel sidelined instead of supported. As a solution, Schacht proposes that funders should collect demographic data on applicants and grantees, review who is influencing their work and look for patterns of negative recommendations; train staff members to respond sensitively when grantees or others ask for a buffer zone between them and an alleged harasser; look actively for new influencers; and look for patterns in who has left the field.
https://www.philanthropy.com/article/Opinion-Sex-Abuse-Is-Draining/244358

An analysis of Brazil's new General Data Privacy Law
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article at National Law Review, Melanie Ramey, an associate with Covington & Burling, analyzes Brazil's General Data Privacy Law, which was signed into law on August 14 and which closely mirrors the EU's General Data Protection Regulation. The law significantly increases Brazil's data protection regime, and appears to be aimed at making Brazil one of the few countries to provide data protections comparable to those of the EU. The law will come into force in February 2020.
https://www.natlawreview.com/article/brazil-s-new-general-data-privacy-law-follows-gdpr-provisions

Alleged BitConnect fraud may exceed India's biggest banking scandal
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article at Bloomberg, Archana Chaudhary and Jeanette Rodrigues outline an investigation in the Indian state of Gujarat that alleges that BitConnect was a bitcoin-based Ponzi scheme. The fraud could be bigger than the country's largest banking scandal and reach as far away as Texas. The evidence so far uncovered by the Criminal Investigation Department has led to indictments against eight policemen and implicates a former lawmaker in the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party on charges of abduction and extortion. Inflows into BitConnect from Indian investors are thought to have been partly the result of Prime Minister Darendra Modi's sudden November 2016 demonetization of higher-value banknotes.
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-08-09/cryptokidnapping-or-how-to-lose-3-billion-of-bitcoin-in-india


***

DIARY
==============
If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

Amsterdam Privacy Conference
----------------------------------------
October 5-9, 2018
Amsterdam, Netherlands
APC 2018 brings together researchers, practitioners, policy makers and professionals in the field of privacy to share insights, exchange ideas and formulate, discuss and answer the challenging privacy questions that lie ahead of us.
https://www.apc2018.com/

International Conference of Data Protection and Privacy Commissioners
----------------------------------------
October 22-26, 2018
Brussels, Belgium
The 40th version of this event will be hosted by the European Data Protection Supervisor (EDPS), Giovanni Buttarelli and the chair of the Commission for Personal Data Protection of the Republic of Bulgaria, Ventsislav Karadjov. The conference is expected to focus on the recently launched international debate on the ethical dimension of data protection in the digital era. Accompanying conference events will also take place in Bulgaria.
https://icdppc.org/

Mozilla Festival
----------------------------------------
October 22-26, 2018
London, UK
Each year, MozFest features talks from luminaries at the intersection of technology and society, including hackers, journalists, activists, and others in a seven-day celebration for, by, and about people who love the internet, showcasing world-changing ideas and technology through workshops, talks, and interactive sessions.
https://mozillafestival.org/

Web Summit
----------------------------------------
November 5-8, 2018
Lisbon, Portugal
Web Summit began as a simple idea in 2010: to connect the technology community with all industries, both old and new. Since then, Web Summit has grown to become the largest technology conference in the world - it is expecting more than 59,000 entrepreneurs, investors, media, and others from 170 countries this year and will present more than 1,200 speakers.
https://websummit.com/

Meeting of the Minds Summit 2018
----------------------------------------
November 27-29, 2018
Sacramento, CA, USA
The 12th annual Meeting of the Minds summit will spotlight tools and best practices working for smart city leaders across the globe. The event focuses on emerging and tested urban sustainability solutions which are scalable, replicable, and transferable for cities and regions. Discussions are rooted in a deep understanding of technology and equity as key drivers for smart cities.
http://meetingoftheminds.org/events/motm2018

Munin Conference on Scholarly Publishing
----------------------------------------
November 28, 2018
Tromso, Norway
The Munin Conference is an annual conference on scholarly publishing and communication, primarily revolving around open access, open data and open science. The 2018 conference will be the thirteenth edition.
https://site.uit.no/muninconf/

Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection 2019
----------------------------------------
January 30 - February 1, 2019
Brussels, Belgium
One of the world's leading privacy conferences, CPDP is a multi-disciplinary event that offers the cutting edge in legal, regulatory, academic, and technological development in privacy and data protection. Within an atmosphere of independence and mutual respect, CPDP gathers academics, lawyers, practitioners, policy-makers, industry and civil society from all over the world in Brussels, offering them an arena to exchange ideas and discuss the latest emerging issues and trends.
https://www.cpdpconferences.org/call-for-panels

Future of Health Privacy Summit 2019
----------------------------------------
January 28-29, 2019
Washington, DC, USA
The 8th International Summit on the Future of Health Privacy will feature keynote speakers Isabelle Falque-Pierrotin, President of the French data protection regulator, CNIL, and the former chair of the EU Article 29 Working Party during the time when it was responsible for developing the General Data Protection Regulation, and Don Rucker, the US National Coordinator for Health Information Technology. This year's summit will focus on the impact that GDPR and the Cambridge Analytica scandal will have on health care and technology around the world.
https://patientprivacyrights.org/2019hps/

FAT* 2019
----------------------------------------
January 29-31, 2019
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
The second annual ACM FAT* Conference 2019 brings together researchers and practitioners interested in fairness, accountability, and transparency in socio-technical systems. ACM FAT* 2019 builds on the success of the inaugural 2018 conference, which was held in New York. The 2019 conference will be held in Atlanta, Georgia.
https://fatconference.org/2019/index.html

TicTec 2019
----------------------------------------
March 19-20, 2019
Paris, France
TiCTeC 2019 will bring together individuals from academic and applied backgrounds as well as businesses, public authorities, NGOs, funders and education institutions to discuss ideas, present research and build a network of individuals interested in the civic technology landscape.
https://www.mysociety.org/2018/09/03/join-us-in-paris-for-tictec-2019/

Internet Freedom Festival 2019
----------------------------------------
April 1-5, 2019
Valencia, Spain
The Internet Freedom Festival is one of the largest, most diverse, and most inclusive unconferences in the world. Every year, 1000+ activists, journalists, technologists and human rights defenders from over 100 countries gather for a week of sharing and learning. Made by the community for the community, the IFF is known for creating a positive and inclusive environment for hands-on, multidisciplinary collaboration. As an example of this, women make up 50% of participants and presenters, while every year some of the most affected communities get assistance to participate through IFF's well-known Diversity and Inclusion Fund.
https://internetfreedomfestival.org/

We Robot 2019
----------------------------------------
April 11-13, 2019
Miami, Florida, US
We Robot is an interdisciplinary conference on the legal and policy questions relating to robots. The increasing sophistication of robots and their widespread deployment everywhere - from the home, to hospitals, to public spaces, and even to the battlefield - disrupts existing legal regimes and requires new thinking on policy issues. The conference fosters conversations between the people designing, building, and deploying robots, and the people who design or influence the legal and social structures in which robots will operate.
http://robots.law.miami.edu/2019/

Global Privacy Summit 2019
----------------------------------------
May 2-3. 2019
Washington, DC
The annual conference of the International Association of Privacy Professionals. Intended for anyone who works in privacy anywhere across the globe, whether they work in the public or private sector.
https://iapp.org/conference/speak-at-an-iapp-conference/proposals/

re:publica 2019
----------------------------------------
May 6-8, 2019
Berlin, Germany
The re:publica in Berlin is Europe's biggest conference on topics concerning digitization and society while also being one of the world's most exceptional festivals on digital culture. Since its beginnings in 2007 with 700 bloggers in attendance, it has grown into an international society conference. In 2017 it had 9,000 national and international participants from all areas of society.
https://re-publica.com/en

Privacy Law Scholars 2019
----------------------------------------
May 23-24, 2019
Berkeley, California, USA
Organized jointly by BCLT and the George Washington University Law School, PLSC assembles a wide array of privacy law scholars and practitioners from around the world to discuss current issues and foster greater connections between academia and practice.
https://www.law.berkeley.edu/research/bclt/bcltevents/2019annual-privacy-law-scholars-conference/

RightsCon 2019
----------------------------------------
June 11-14, 2019
Tunis, Tunisia
RightsCon Tunis will continue to be a space for civil society, technologists, businesses, startups, public servants, and lawyers to connect, collaborate, build strategies, draft declarations, and move forward real-world change. Whether in provocative plenaries, intimate roundtables, informal meetings, or the lively Community Village, RightsCon Tunis will help shape the future of human rights in the digital age.
https://www.rightscon.org/about/

LIBER 2019
----------------------------------------
June 26-28, 2019
Dublin, Ireland
The LIBER Conference 2019 will be held in collaboration with CONUL, the Consortium of National and University Libraries for the island of Ireland. The conference brings library directors and their staff together for three days of networking and collaboration. The goal of the conference is to identify the most pressing needs for research libraries, and to share information and ideas for addressing those needs.
https://liberconference.eu/dublin2019/

85th World Library and Information Congress
----------------------------------------
August 24-30, 2019
Athens, Greece
The theme of IFLA's 2019 conference,"Libraries: dialogue for change", invites the library and information science international community to discuss, re-examine, re-think and re-interpret the role of libraries as promoters of change. In an era of rapid changes in the socio-economic-technological sphere, libraries ought to define their role as information providers, promoters of reading, settlers for the community they serve, key players in innovation, and leading actors for changes in society. A constant, open dialectic relationship between libraries and society will lead to well-informed citizens facilitating progress and development, implementing the UN Agenda for Sustainable Development and leading to prosperity in all fields of the democratic society.
https://2019.ifla.org/#news

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News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week ending 27 July 2018

====================================================

The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF.  Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

 

Our staff, advisers and major grantees tweet at http://bit.ly/13j5fjq. Current and former grantees featured in this issue: Benetech, Citizen Lab, La Quadrature du Net, Tactical Tech.

 

JOB OPENINGS

 

Wikimedia

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Wikimedia is looking for a senior public policy manager, who will be one of two such managers on the Public Policy team, based in the legal department, and will work closely with outside digital rights advocates and Wikimedia affiliates in the US and internationally. Wikimedia seeks candidates with successful track records in advocacy work around internet legal and policy issues.

http://bit.ly/2KXybrR

 

DataKind

----------------------------------------------------------------------

DataKind is searching for a new Director of Global Community. DataKind brings together volunteers from around the world to use data science and AI in the service of humanity. The director of global community will be responsible for recruiting expert volunteer teams, working with charity partners to define their data science needs, and managing projects through to success.

http://bit.ly/2KshVeU

 

 

NEWS

=====

For breaking news stories, visit: http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:news/

 

EU fines Google €4.34 billion over anti-competitive Android licensing

----------------------------------------------------------------------

At the Guardian, Jennifer Rankin reports that the EU has fined Google €4.34 billion over licensing terms that have constrained smartphone manufacturers using its Android operating system in order to drive revenues for its profitable search engine. Google has 90 days to remediate its practices. In a blog posting, the company says it will appeal and claims the EU's decision will harm consumers. Also at the Guardian, Samuel Gibbs finds that a number of analysts think the ruling is "too little, too late" because Google is now too firmly entrenched for others to be able to compete. In an editorial, the Guardian argues that the ruling opens up wider issues, still to be decided.

Guardian (fine): http://bit.ly/2v7uGoG

Google: http://bit.ly/2LCCkSg

Guardian (reactions): http://bit.ly/2LoeoTs

Guardian (editorial): http://bit.ly/2LQ8UNa

 

Indian government threatens to sue WhatsApp over spread of fake news

----------------------------------------------------------------------

At Vice, David Gilbert reports that the Indian government is threatening to sue WhatsApp over the viral spread of fake videos that have been linked to mob lynchings. The company has published new restrictions on forwarding messages, photos, and videos, and will test lowering the limit on simultaneous chats to five. Also at Vice, Gilbert and Zeenat Saberin report on several violent deaths due to WhatsApp rumors, including that of Sukanta Chakraborty, whose job as a "rumor buster" for the state of Tripura involved teaching local village residents to spot fake news. Analysts in India say there is reason to believe that prime minister Narandra Modi's BJP party is behind much of the fear-based fake news circulating on WhatsApp and other platforms.

Vice (lawsuit): http://bit.ly/2LFG1q4

Vice (deaths): http://bit.ly/2LU4STW

 

Formally organized social media manipulation campaigns spread to 48 countries

----------------------------------------------------------------------

A report from the Oxford Internet Institute finds that the number of countries with evidence of formally organized domestic social media manipulation campaigns has risen from 28 to 48 since 2017. The EU vs Disinfo site publishes its catalogue of  over 4,200 cases of debunked pro-Kremlin disinformation from more than 20 countries. In a report presented to the British House of Lords and published by the Constitution Society, Julianne Kerr Morrison, Ravi Naik, and Tactical Tech co-founder Stephanie Hankey argue that government should increase oversight of political campaigning, encourage spending transparency, and continue to engage with social media and digital advertising companies. Naked Security reports that the US Department of Justice has announced that under a new policy it will inform businesses, organizations, and individuals if they're being targeted by foreign operations with the goal of influencing US elections.

OII: http://bit.ly/2On3Sts

EU vs Disinfo: http://bit.ly/2v47eJ1

Constitution Society: http://bit.ly/2A9n9LV

Naked Security: http://bit.ly/2v5ODME

 

German police raid privacy protection association Zwiebelfreunde

----------------------------------------------------------------------

La Quadrature du Net reports that on June 20 the German police searched the homes of several of the Zwiebelfreunde association's board members and seized all their computers and storage media, and went on to search the Augsburg hackerspace OpenLab2. The reported reason: Zwiebelfreunde collects donations for Riseup, which hosts the email address associated with a blog calling for anti-fascist protests in Augsburg, which the police consider a call for violent actions. LQDN believes that the real reason is that Zwiebelfreunde has long promoted the use of privacy-enhancing tools such as Tor.

LQDN: http://bit.ly/2uOmom2


Steve Bannon plans anti-Soros right-wing European revolution

----------------------------------------------------------------------

At the Daily Beast, Nico Hines reports that Steve Bannon, Donald Trump's former White House chief advisor, is setting up a foundation in Europe called The Movement which he hopes will spark a right-wing revolution in Europe, starting with the May 2019 European Parliament elections. Bannon hopes his organization will ultimately rival George Soros's Open Society Foundation, and is laying the groundwork for an envisioned right-wing "supergroup" within the European Parliament.

Daily Beast: https://thebea.st/2AebxHu

 

US: Open government advocates fear the secrecy of private messaging

----------------------------------------------------------------------

The Associated Press reports that private messaging apps are increasingly being used by government officials conducting public business, and that the use of these technologies is undermining open government laws and policies. Different states are taking different approaches: in Kansas the governor has banned the use of private accounts for any of his office's business, while in Kentucky and Arizona lawmakers have unsuccessfully proposed exempting all communications on personal phones from state open records laws. 
AP: http://bit.ly/2mL229d

 

Social media giants launch Data Transfer Project for data portability

----------------------------------------------------------------------

At the company's blog, Microsoft's vice-president for corporate standards announces that Microsoft, in conjunction with Facebook, Google, and Twitter, is launching the open source Data Transfer Project, intended to help users seamlessly and securely move their data between their services. At The Verge, Russell Brandom reports that most of the coding so far has been done by Google and Microsoft engineers and notes that Google claims the initiative is intended to give those who download their data the tools to make use of it.

Microsoft: http://bit.ly/2NOvhn4

The Verge: http://bit.ly/2mKAC3f

 

 

FEATURES AND ANALYSIS

====================

For more features and analysis selected by the Program team, visit:

http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:oped/

 

Making machines play fair

----------------------------------------------------------------------

In this video clip of a talk given as part of the Royal Society's year-long "You and AI" lecture series, Microsoft theoretical computer science Cynthia Dwork discusses the emerging scientific theory of how to build fairness into algorithmic systems. She considers many building blocks, from defining fairness and the different demands of individual and group fairness, to understanding scoring and financial incentives, and the use of randomness. Others in the lecture series include AI Now Institute director Kate Crawford speaking about machine learning and bias and DeepMind CEO Demis Hassabis outlining the history of AI,

YouTube: http://bit.ly/2mKB6X7

Royal Society: http://bit.ly/2AdAOSa

 

Cambodia: Chinese espionage group TEMP.Periscope targets July 2018 elections

----------------------------------------------------------------------

In this blog posting, the US security company FireEye reports the results of its investigation into the Chinese espionage group TEMP.Periscope. FireEye has found active compromises of multiple Cambodian entities related to the country's upcoming July 29 elections. TEMP.Periscope has been active since at least 2013, and previously targeted maritime-related targets, consulting services, and the high-tech industry, among others. FireEye expects the group to continue targeting these and other agencies and organizations. 

FireEye: http://bit.ly/2LmD2DP

 

Blockchain's potential for social benefits

----------------------------------------------------------------------

In this blog posting, Jim Fruchterman, head of Benetech, summarizes the July 6 TechCrunch conference on blockchain, which he attended in order to represent the social good sector at an event otherwise solely attended bytechnologists, investors, and entrepreneurs.  Fruchterman believes that blockchain technology could be especially useful in low-trust environments - for example, his team is working on a system for fingerprinting videos to help authenticate evidence collected during the Syrian conflict. In a video clip at TechCrunch, Fruchterman discusses the potential with reporter Megan Rose Dickey.

Benetech: http://bit.ly/2AcPG35

TechCrunch: https://tcrn.ch/2uQF3Oe

 

UN Special Rapporteur recommends

----------------------------------------------------------------------

In this blog posting at Citizen Lab, Lex Bill notes that the draft report from the UN Special Rapporteur on violence against women, Dubravka Šimonović, draws on recommendations Citizen Lab made in its formal 2017 submission. Among its recommendations: states should legislate to prohibit emerging forms of online, gender-based violence, while internet intermediaries should commit to eradicating online gender-based violence and promote human rights and digital security. Citizen Lab commends the Special Rapporteur for recognizing the need to respect both the rights to privacy and freedom of expression and the rights of women and girls online.

Citizen Lab: http://bit.ly/2Ltdo0o

UN: http://bit.ly/2JWJE6d

 

Dealing with Holocaust deniers: lessons from moderating AskHistorians

----------------------------------------------------------------------

In this article at Slate, Johannes Breit, a volunteer moderator for the AskHistorians subreddit, discusses the core principles the moderators have had to adopt. The subreddit, which is one of the largest history forums on the internet, operates a strict ban on Holocaust denialism, including "just asking questions", which in their experience is intended to sow doubt rather than genuinely seek knowledge. Facebook's newly announced policy of removing posts for "advocating violence" won't work, Breit argues, calling Holocaust denial "a form of political agitation in the service of bigotry". They have concluded that denying these positions a platform is the only option.

Slate: https://slate.me/2mJu30z

 

US: The NSA's AT&T spy hubs

----------------------------------------------------------------------

In this article at The Intercept, Ryan Gallagher reveals the extent of AT&T's status as a trusted partner in the US National Security Agency's surveillance program.  Monitoring the eight peering circuits at backbone facilities in Seattle, San Francisco, LA, Dallas, Chicago, Atlanta, Washington, DC, and New York, says former AT&T technician Mark Klein, gives the NSA access to all the data that's interchanged between AT&T's network and those belonging to other companies that peer with it, such as Spring, Cogent, Level 3, Telia, Tata Communications, Telecom Italia, and Deutsche Telekom.

The Intercept: http://bit.ly/2LrkTEI

 

 

***

 

DIARY

==============

To see more events recommended by the Information Program team, visit:

https://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:events/. If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

 

Defcon

----------------------------------------

August 9-12, 2018

Las Vegas, NV, USA

The heart of the DEF CON 26 theme is the concept of the counterfuture. The counterfuture is the open-source alternative to totalitarian dystopia; a world where we use tech and ingenuity for empowerment and connection rather than isolation and control.

http://bit.ly/2A2ojUE

 

Free and Open Communications on the Internet

----------------------------------------

FOCI brings together researchers and practitioners from technology, law, and policy who are working on means to study, detect, or circumvent practices that inhibit free and open communications on the Internet.

http://bit.ly/2N8qWKW

 

4VOX-Pol Third Biennial Conference

----------------------------------------

August 20-21, 2018

Amsterdam, The Netherlands

The VOX-Pol Network of Excellence (NoE) is a European Union Framework Programme 7 (FP7)-funded academic research network focused on researching the prevalence, contours, functions, and impacts of Violent Online Political Extremism and responses to it.c

http://bit.ly/2Hhzj3Q

 

World Library and Information Congress

----------------------------------------

August 24-30, 2018

Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

The 84th edition of the World Library and Information Congress has the theme, "Transform Libraries, Transform Societies" with the additional tagline, "Reaching out to the hard to reach", which was chosen in recognition of the critical role played by libraries in the development of a nation, particularly in their ability to transform societies.

http://bit.ly/2qSXIta

 

Human Rights Measurement Initiative (HRMI) co-design workshop

----------------------------------------

September 12 - 14, 2018

Johannesburg, South Africa

Co-hosted with Amnesty International, this workshop will develop innovative and collaborative approaches for using human rights data for impact, and agree on the next steps for HRMI's expansion of country and rights coverage.

http://bit.ly/2JwLWO6

 

SciELO 20 Years Conference

----------------------------------------

September 26-28, 2018

São Paulo, Brazil

In 2018, the SciELO Program will celebrate 20 years of operation, in full alignment with the advances of open science. The conference will address and debate the main political, methodological, and technological issues and trends that define today's state of the art in scholarly communication. These issues will also be shaping the future of the universal openness of scholarly publishing and its relationship with today's Open Access journals, in particular those of the SciELO Network.

http://bit.ly/2FlpVzU

 

Global Congress on Intellectual Property and the Public Interest V

----------------------------------------

September 27-29

Washington, DC, US

The Global Congress is the main meeting of a global network of over 800 researchers, activists, and practitioners who work on the intersection of intellectual property and promotion of the public interest. The core goal is to promote evidence-based policy-making by fostering partnerships between academics and policy advocates from around the world.

http://bit.ly/2sSuVnn

 

Amsterdam Privacy Conference

----------------------------------------

October 5-9, 2018

Amsterdam, Netherlands

APC 2018 brings together researchers, practitioners, policy makers and professionals in the field of privacy to share insights, exchange ideas and formulate, discuss and answer the challenging privacy questions that lie ahead of us. The goal of the conference is to bring together academics, policy makers, journalists, and practitioners to promote active discussion on timely topics, and foster debate on privacy issues between participants from various backgrounds and perspectives.

http://bit.ly/2ucbFEu

 

International Conference of Data Protection and Privacy Commissioners

----------------------------------------

October 22-26, 2018

Brussels, Belgium

The 40th version of this event will be hosted by the European Data Protection Supervisor (EDPS), Giovanni Buttarelli and the chair of the Commission for Personal Data Protection of the Republic of Bulgaria, Ventsislav Karadjov. The conference is expected to focus on the recently launched international debate on the ethical dimension of data protection in the digital era. Accompanying conference events will also take place in Bulgaria.

http://bit.ly/2B1bX38

 

Meeting of the Minds Summit 2018

----------------------------------------

November 27-29, 2018

Sacramento, CA, USA

The 12th annual Meeting of the Minds annual summit will spotlight tools and best practices working for smart city leaders across the globe. The event focuses on emerging and tested urban sustainability solutions which are scalable, replicable, and transferable for cities and regions. Discussions are rooted in a deep understanding of technology and equity as key drivers for smart cities.

http://bit.ly/2N80py1

 

Munin Conference on Scholarly Publishing

----------------------------------------

November 28, 2018

Tromso, Norway

The Munin Conference is an annual conference on scholarly publishing and communication, primarily revolving around open access, open data and open science. The 2018 conference will be the thirteenth edition.

http://bit.ly/2N3zPWb

 

Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection 2019

----------------------------------------

January 30 - February 1, 2019

Brussels, Belgium

The 12th international CPDP conference is accepting submissions for panel and session proposals until June 21, 2018.

http://bit.ly/2sSQ02x

 

We Robot 2019

----------------------------------------

April 11-13, 2019

Miami, Florida, US

We Robot is an interdisciplinary conference on the legal and policy questions relating to robots. The increasing sophistication of robots and their widespread deployment everywhere - from the home, to hospitals, to public spaces, and even to the battlefield - disrupts existing legal regimes and requires new thinking on policy issues. The conference fosters conversations between the people designing, building, and deploying robots, and the people who design or influence the legal and social structures in which robots will operate.

http://bit.ly/2x6T3XD

 

Global Privacy Summit 2019

----------------------------------------

May 2-3. 2019

Washington, DC

The annual conference of the International Association of Privacy Professionals. Intended for anyone who works in privacy anywhere across the globs, whether they work in the public or private sector.

http://bit.ly/2tNnJbP

 

re:publica 2019

----------------------------------------

May 6-8, 2019

Berlin, Germany

The re:publica in Berlin is Europe's biggest conference on topics concerning digitization and society while also being one of the world's most exceptional festivals on digital culture. Since its beginnings in 2007 with 700 bloggers in attendance, it has grown into an international society conference. In 2017 it had 9,000 national and international participants from all areas of society.

http://bit.ly/2GMXl6o

 

 

***

 

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News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week ending 13 July 2018

====================================================

The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF.  Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

 

Our staff, advisers and major grantees tweet at http://bit.ly/13j5fjq. Current and former grantees featured in this issue: Communia, EDRi, Knowledge Ecology International.

 

JOB OPENINGS

=============

 

Wikimedia

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Wikimedia is looking for a senior public policy manager, who will be one of two such managers on the Public Policy team, based in the legal department, and will work closely with outside digital rights advocates and Wikimedia affiliates in the US and internationally. Wikimedia seeks candidates with successful track records in advocacy work around internet legal and policy issues.

http://bit.ly/2KXybrR

 

DataKind

----------------------------------------------------------------------

DataKind is searching for a new Director of Global Community. DataKind brings together volunteers from around the world to use data science and AI in the service of humanity. The director of global community will be responsible for recruiting expert volunteer teams, working with charity partners to define their data science needs, and managing projects through to success. Director of Global Community: http://bit.ly/2KshVeU

 

 

NEWS

=====

For breaking news stories, visit: http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:news/

 

European Parliament votes to reject controversial copyright legislation

----------------------------------------------------------------------

European Digital Rights reports that on July 5 the European Parliament voted not to fast-track the Copyright Directive Reform package by a vote of 278-318. Large numbers of individuals, civil society groups, academics, and the European Wikimedia community protested against the legislation, in particular Article 11 (the "link tax") and Article 13 (the "upload filter").  There will now be an open debate and vote, expected the week of September 10th. At Communia, Timothy Vollmer gives more detail of the politics surrounding the vote.

EDRi: http://bit.ly/2L15VV7

Communia: http://bit.ly/2ztC1Ei

 

US Senate votes to ratify the Marrakesh Treaty

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Knowledge Ecology International reports that the US Senate has voted to approve the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) Marrakesh Treaty to Facilitate Access to Published Works for Persons Who Are Blind, Visually Impaired or Otherwise Print Disabled. The vote brings the total of countries that have notified WIPO that they have ratified the treaty to 40. At least 54 more countries have signed or ratified the treaty but not yet notified WIPO.

KEI: http://bit.ly/2L1jBQ0

 

EU regulators reject ICANN's latest Whois privacy plan

----------------------------------------------------------------------

At The Register, Kieren McCarthy reports that the European Data Protection Supervisor's office has rejected the latest plan proposed by the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) for putting the Whois domain name directory into compliance with the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). ICANN's contracts with its domain name registrars require them to collect names, addresses, and personal contact details from all domain name registrants in order to populate Whois. Since regulators began offering guidance on how to bring Whois into compliance in 2003, ICANN has made numerous failed proposals, including trying to argue that it's not a data controller. In May, ICANN requested EDPS's advice after a German court rejected ICANN's attempt to force a domain name registrar to continue collecting Whois data.

The Register: http://bit.ly/2zwRbZG


Social media restrictions spread in Africa

----------------------------------------------------------------------

AFP reports that Zambia plans to join a growing list of African countries in restricting social media usage. Communications minister Brian Mushimba told the Zambian parliament on July 5 that the measures were needed to fight fraud and abuse and reduce online pornography. Dispatch reports that Uganda began blocking "over the top" access on July 1 for anyone who hadn't paid the country's tax of UGX200 (US$0.52) per day. Ugandan Communications Commission executive director Godfrey Mutabazi says that the country's telecommunications companies have begun blocking VPNs, which Ugandans have been using to avoid the tax. The New York Times reports that an Egyptian court has sentenced Lebanese tourist Mona el-Mazbouh to eight years in prison for "deliberately broadcasting false rumors which aim to undermine society and attack religions" in a video tirade she posted on her Facebook page.

Quartz: http://bit.ly/2KYv2bf

Dispatch: http://bit.ly/2zwjt6C

New York Times: https://nyti.ms/2L5muMj

 

US: Immigration and Customs Enforcement system automatically recommends detention

----------------------------------------------------------------------

At Motherboard, Daniel Oberhaus reports that as a result of the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" policy, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) changed its risk assessment software so it recommended detention for all apprehended immigrants rather than, as before, just those with serious criminal histories. After the change ICE tripled its detention rate, imprisoning 43,000 people in 2017. In a 2015 review, the Department of Homeland Security called the risk assessment system "ineffective".
Motherboard: http://bit.ly/2ubFHWb

 

Chinese cameras conduct "emotional surveillance"

----------------------------------------------------------------------

At the LA Times, Don Lee reports that the facial expressions in images collected by surveillance cameras placed in classrooms in his school in Eastern China are being used to create a running score for each student and class. The scores are used to trigger alerts that require teachers to intervene if students appear disengaged or moody. Student and parent protests have led the school to temporarily pause the system.

LA Times: https://lat.ms/2mbBEF7

Proxy for EU readers: http://bit.ly/2NIvPeP

 

 

FEATURES AND ANALYSIS

====================

For more features and analysis selected by the Program team, visit:

http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:oped/

 

Tim Berners-Lee plans to re-decentralize the web

----------------------------------------------------------------------

In this interview at Vanity Fair, World Wide Web inventor Tim Berners-Lee admits he was devastated to learn that Russian hackers and Cambridge Analytica interfered with the 2016 US presidential election. In response, Berners-Lee is working on Solid, a platform intended to re-decentralize the web and give individuals, rather than corporations, control over their data.

Vanity Fair: http://bit.ly/2L60pgQ

 

How Facebook "Likes" created the attention monopoly

----------------------------------------------------------------------

In this article at Medium, Matt Locke recounts the history of Facebook "Likes". Originally invented as a harmless way of helping to curate postings on the B3ta web community, "Likes" were adopted as a Facebook feature in 2009. It was combining "Likes" with the social graph and the newsfeed that gave Facebook its dominating role in advertising. Faecbook's attention monopoly might have been avoided, Locke says, by requiring social media companies to adopt common technical standards in 2009. At Locus, Cory Doctorow urges us to distinguish automated persuasion from automated targeting. Elections and referendums haven't been tipped by changing people into racists, but by connecting to racists and persuading them to vote. Doctorow calls the corporate surveillance system corrupt because the profits are highly concentrated but the damage is borne by society at large.

Medium: http://bit.ly/2NHqGne

Locus: http://bit.ly/2N8tbxY

 

Cybercrime profits from ad fraud

----------------------------------------------------------------------

In this report from the Marketing Science Consulting Group, Augustine Fou documents the connection between cybercrime and ad fraud, which he says is the most lucrative use for botnets. Criminals use the devices they compromise to create botnets to click on fake ads displayed on fake sites that they control and that launder traffic by auto-forwarding it to other sites. Fake apps drain most digital advertising budgets. Criminals also profit from selling the tools necessary for these frauds. The Washington Post reports that Twitter is suspending more than 1 million fake and suspicious accounts per day, or a total of over 70 million in May and June 2018, based on input from the AI start-up Magic Pony, which Twitter acquired in 2016. 
Marketing Science (Google Drive): http://bit.ly/2Je1iC5

Washington Post: https://wapo.st/2uqu6Sm

 

Ways to think about machine learning

----------------------------------------------------------------------

In this blog posting, Benedict Evans, a venture capitalist with Andreesen Horowitz, discusses how to think about machine learning, proposing that the key elements are automation, enabling technology, and relational databases. Because data isn't fungible, single-purpose machine learning systems will proliferate but will not approach "intelligence", just as in the 1950s we imagined fully functional robot servants - but got washing machines. In a Guardian feature, Olivia Solon notes that many start-ups claim their offerings are based on artificial intelligence but actually rely on humans to work. Because research shows that people tend to disclose more when they think they are talking to (or their data is being processed by) a machine rather than a human, this lack of transparency is an increasing problem.

Benedict Evans: http://bit.ly/2N5GGyg

Guardian: http://bit.ly/2zwEiyG

 

The disappearing horizon of autonomous vehicles

----------------------------------------------------------------------

In this Spectator article, Christian Wolmar, the author of the resent book Driverless Cars: On a Road to Nowhere, visits the autonomous vehicle exhibition in Stuttgart and finds that manufacturers are as skeptical about the hype as he is. The exhibition was full of suppliers, but no car manufacturers, and the few cars on display were not driverless. In a review of Wolmar's book at ZDNet, Wendy M. Grossman found his arguments compelling. In testimony before the California State Senate in February 2018, Rosemary Shahan, founder of Consumers for Auto Reliability and Safety, argued for applying more stringent disclosure and safety standards before allowing autonomous vehicles on the public roads, and warned that the US federal government is preemptively pushing the public to trust car manufacturers to get safety and security right.

Spectator: http://bit.ly/2N4whmq

ZDNet: https://zd.net/2JdBTZp

California Senate (PDF): http://bit.ly/2L9FPfx

 

UK: Government Digital Service struggles to overcome political culture

----------------------------------------------------------------------

In this article at The Register, Rebecca Hill discusses the present state of the Government Digital Service (GDS), set up in 2010 to place technology at the heart of government. GDS founding leader Mike Bracken has gone on to help other governments to copy the group, but in the UK GDS has stalled because the structure and culture within government departments doesn't fit the digital ethos. The story contains lessons for those seeking to digitize organizations with long-entrenched resistance to change.

The Register: http://bit.ly/2L1U0Xe

 

 

***

 

DIARY

==============

To see more events recommended by the Information Program team, visit:

https://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:events/. If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

 

State of Our Networks

----------------------------------------

July 13-18, 2018

Toronto, Canada

The theme of this year's State of Our Networks is Do It With Others (DIWO). In the face of threats to the open internet, which tools and tactics will help us respond to the opportunities and challenges of this moment? We are inviting proposals for talks, workshops, discussions, demonstrations and interventions to explore these questions.

http://bit.ly/2NKDWHB

 

The Circle of HOPE

----------------------------------------

July 20-22, 2018

New York, NY, USA

Organized by 2600 Magazine, the 12th biennial Hackers on Planet Earth conference celebrates the hacker spirit. Talks typically feature new ways of examining and dissecting technology to reveal inconvenient truths.

http://bit.ly/2BbzJpM

 

PETS

----------------------------------------

July 24-27, 2018

Barcelona, Spain

The Privacy Enhancing Technologies Symposium brings together privacy experts from around the world to present and discuss recent advances and new perspectives on research in privacy technologies. PETS/PoPETs is the premier venue for novel applied and/or theoretical research into the design, analysis, experimentation, or fielding of privacy-enhancing technologies.

http://bit.ly/2unEs5z

 

Defcon

----------------------------------------

August 9-12, 2018

Las Vegas, NV, USA

The heart of the DEF CON 26 theme is the concept of the counterfuture. The counterfuture is the open-source alternative to totalitarian dystopia; a world where we use tech and ingenuity for empowerment and connection rather than isolation and control.

http://bit.ly/2A2ojUE

 

Free and Open Communications on the Internet

----------------------------------------

FOCI brings together researchers and practitioners from technology, law, and policy who are working on means to study, detect, or circumvent practices that inhibit free and open communications on the Internet.

http://bit.ly/2N8qWKW

 

VOX-Pol Third Biennial Conference

----------------------------------------

August 20-21, 2018

Amsterdam, The Netherlands

The VOX-Pol Network of Excellence (NoE) is a European Union Framework Programme 7 (FP7)-funded academic research network focused on researching the prevalence, contours, functions, and impacts of Violent Online Political Extremism and responses to it.c

http://bit.ly/2Hhzj3Q

 

World Library and Information Congress

----------------------------------------

August 24-30, 2018

Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

The 84th edition of the World Library and Information Congress has the theme, "Transform Libraries, Transform Societies" with the additional tagline, "Reaching out to the hard to reach", which was chosen in recognition of the critical role played by libraries in the development of a nation, particularly in their ability to transform societies.

http://bit.ly/2qSXIta

 

Human Rights Measurement Initiative (HRMI) co-design workshop

----------------------------------------

September 12 - 14, 2018

Johannesburg, South Africa

Co-hosted with Amnesty International, this workshop will develop innovative and collaborative approaches for using human rights data for impact, and agree on the next steps for HRMI's expansion of country and rights coverage.

http://bit.ly/2JwLWO6

 

SciELO 20 Years Conference

----------------------------------------

September 26-28, 2018

São Paulo, Brazil

In 2018, the SciELO Program will celebrate 20 years of operation, in full alignment with the advances of open science. The conference will address and debate the main political, methodological, and technological issues and trends that define today's state of the art in scholarly communication. These issues will also be shaping the future of the universal openness of scholarly publishing and its relationship with today's Open Access journals, in particular those of the SciELO Network.

http://bit.ly/2FlpVzU

 

Global Congress on Intellectual Property and the Public Interest V

----------------------------------------

September 27-29

Washington, DC, US

The Global Congress is the main meeting of a global network of over 800 researchers, activists, and practitioners who work on the intersection of intellectual property and promotion of the public interest. The core goal is to promote evidence-based policy-making by fostering partnerships between academics and policy advocates from around the world.

http://bit.ly/2sSuVnn

 

Amsterdam Privacy Conference

----------------------------------------

October 5-9, 2018

Amsterdam, Netherlands

APC 2018 brings together researchers, practitioners, policy makers and professionals in the field of privacy to share insights, exchange ideas and formulate, discuss and answer the challenging privacy questions that lie ahead of us. The goal of the conference is to bring together academics, policy makers, journalists, and practitioners to promote active discussion on timely topics, and foster debate on privacy issues between participants from various backgrounds and perspectives.

http://bit.ly/2ucbFEu

 

International Conference of Data Protection and Privacy Commissioners

----------------------------------------

October 22-26, 2018

Brussels, Belgium

The 40th version of this event will be hosted by the European Data Protection Supervisor (EDPS), Giovanni Buttarelli and the chair of the Commission for Personal Data Protection of the Republic of Bulgaria, Ventsislav Karadjov. The conference is expected to focus on the recently launched international debate on the ethical dimension of data protection in the digital era. Accompanying conference events will also take place in Bulgaria.

http://bit.ly/2B1bX38

 

Meeting of the Minds Summit 2018

----------------------------------------

November 27-29, 2018

Sacramento, CA, USA

The 12th annual Meeting of the Minds annual summit will spotlight tools and best practices working for smart city leaders across the globe. The event focuses on emerging and tested urban sustainability solutions which are scalable, replicable, and transferable for cities and regions. Discussions are rooted in a deep understanding of technology and equity as key drivers for smart cities.

http://bit.ly/2N80py1

 

Munin Conference on Scholarly Publishing

----------------------------------------

November 28, 2018

Tromso, Norway

The Munin Conference is an annual conference on scholarly publishing and communication, primarily revolving around open access, open data and open science. The 2018 conference will be the thirteenth edition.

http://bit.ly/2N3zPWb

 

Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection 2019

----------------------------------------

January 30 - February 1, 2019

Brussels, Belgium

The 12th international CPDP conference is accepting submissions for panel and session proposals until June 21, 2018.

http://bit.ly/2sSQ02x

 

We Robot 2019

----------------------------------------

April 11-13, 2019

Miami, Florida, US

We Robot is an interdisciplinary conference on the legal and policy questions relating to robots. The increasing sophistication of robots and their widespread deployment everywhere - from the home, to hospitals, to public spaces, and even to the battlefield - disrupts existing legal regimes and requires new thinking on policy issues. The conference fosters conversations between the people designing, building, and deploying robots, and the people who design or influence the legal and social structures in which robots will operate.

http://bit.ly/2x6T3XD

 

Global Privacy Summit 2019

----------------------------------------

May 2-3. 2019

Washington, DC

The annual conference of the International Association of Privacy Professionals. Intended for anyone who works in privacy anywhere across the globs, whether they work in the public or private sector.

http://bit.ly/2tNnJbP

 

re:publica 2019

----------------------------------------

May 6-8, 2019

Berlin, Germany

The re:publica in Berlin is Europe's biggest conference on topics concerning digitization and society while also being one of the world's most exceptional festivals on digital culture. Since its beginnings in 2007 with 700 bloggers in attendance, it has grown into an international society conference. In 2017 it had 9,000 national and international participants from all areas of society.

http://bit.ly/2GMXl6o

 

 

***

 

Hear more from the Information Program!

================================

If you want to hear more from the Information Program team each week, consider subscribing to our shared bookmarks using this RSS feed:

http://feeds.pinboard.in/rss/secret:95194ab804ccccac713b/u:osi_info_program/

 

You can also read more about our work on the Open Society Foundations website: http://www.opensocietyfoundations.org/about/programs/information-program

 

Hear less from the Information Program!

================================

If you wish to subscribe to this fortnightly digest, please send an email with the subject line "Subscribe" to infonewsdigest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

 

If you wish to unsubscribe from this fortnightly digest, please send an email with the subject line "Unsubscribe" to info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

 

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Additionally, it uses the bit.ly URL shortening service, which operates under the following privacy policy: http://bit.ly/pages/privacy/

 

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0

License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/

 

Open Society Foundation, part of the Open Society Foundations, is a company limited by guarantee registered in England and Wales (company number 4571628) and a registered charity (charity number 1105069). Its registered office address is 7th Floor, Millbank Tower, 21-24 Millbank, London SW1P 4QP

 

 

News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week ending 29 June 2018

====================================================

The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF.  Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

 

Our staff, advisers and major grantees tweet at http://bit.ly/13j5fjq. Current and former grantees featured in this issue: Citizen Lab, Communia, EFF, R3D.

 

JOB OPENINGS

============

DataKind

----------------------------------------------------------------------

DataKind is searching for a new Director of Global Community and a Technical Project Manager. DataKind brings together volunteers from around the world to use data science and AI in the service of humanity. The director of global community will be responsible for recruiting expert volunteer teams, working with charity partners to define their data science needs, and managing projects through to success. The technical program manager will be responsible for leading the strategy to expand and support their network of volunteer data scientists and AI experts to create a global force for good.

Director of Global Community: http://bit.ly/2KshVeU

Technical program manager: http://bit.ly/2tNrAp4

 

 

NEWS

=====

For breaking news stories, visit: http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:news/

 

Egypt: Parliament approves Law on Combating Cybercrimes

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Access Now reports that the Egyptian Parliament has approved the Law on  Combating Cybercrimes, which legalizes broad internet censorship and full surveillance of the country's population. Access Now notes that the law also enables the government to exchange data with foreign countries without requiring those countries to have data protection laws or other requirements limiting scope, retention or processing; is vague about its definitions and purpose; and exacerbates the threat to free expression already posed by Egypt's media and publications laws.

Access Now: http://bit.ly/2KxmuYo

 

European Parliament votes to tighten online copyright

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Communia, an association of digital rights groups, reports that as a result of the June 20 vote on the report on the proposed Copyright in the Single Market Directive, the Legal Affairs Committee of the European Parliament (JURI) has adopted</a> Article 11 (the  publishers' "link tax"); Article 13 (upload filters for open platforms); and a provision intended to force image search engines to pay to display thumbnail images as search results. Earlier, JURI voted against introducing freedom of panorama and permitting the use of protected works in user-generated content. Communia calls the vote "an utter disregard for the rights of citizens in the digital environment". On his blog, Michael Geist reports that in Canada, where the Standing Committee on Industry, Science, and Technology is conducting a copyright review, the motion picture industry is calling for increased liability for internet intermediaries.

Communia: http://bit.ly/2KfMKHv

Geist: http://bit.ly/2Naj5x4

 

US: Supreme Court rules that the Fourth Amendment protects cellphone location data

----------------------------------------------------------------------

At EFF, Andrew Crocker and Jennifer Lynch report that the US Supreme Court has ruled 5-4 in Carpenter v. United States that the Fourth Amendment protects cellphone location information. The result will be to require police to get a warrant in order to access this data. At Lawfare, Sabrina McCubbin gives further background on the case, legal precedents, and the Court's reasoning.

EFF: http://bit.ly/2tDNwnf
Lawfare: http://bit.ly/2tD1cz9
 

India: Group campaigns for privacy-protecting Aadhaar law

----------------------------------------------------------------------

At The Hindu, Soibam Rocky Singh reports that in response to the Cambridge Analytica scandal and security concerns surrounding the Aadhaar database, the Internet Freedom Foundation is backing a model bill created by a group of lawyers and policy analysts. The Indian Privacy Code 2018 is intended to shift power from the Unique Identification Authority of India (UIDAI) to the people by granting citizens the right to know what information has been collected and how it is used; it also creates an option to refuse consent, not currently possible due to administrative practices.

The Hindu: http://bit.ly/2IEyl28

 

US: Security contractors use school shootings to sell facial recognition

----------------------------------------------------------------------

At the Washington Post, Drew Harwell reports that security contractors are pitching facial recognition systems to leaders of US schools and community centers as a safety shield against school shootings even though the technology is unproven as a deterrent. Vendors decline to give details of how their systems have been designed, tested, or protected on the basis that it's proprietary information, while parents complain about the lack of oversight.
Washington Post: https://wapo.st/2yRQtWs

 

New York Police Department enlarges gang database 70% over four years

----------------------------------------------------------------------

At The Intercept, Alice Speri reports that the New York Police Department has expanded its gang database by 70% since Mayor Bill de Blasio took office in January 2014. In that time, 99% of those added to the database, which now includes over 42,000 people, were non-white. The NYPD has not explained the criteria on which additions to the database are made or details of how the list is shared or managed. Critics believe the database's expansion is a response to a class-action lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of NYPD's stop-and-frisk program, which stopped 684,330 people in 2011, its peak year.

The Intercept: http://bit.ly/2Kuh0Oc

 

 

FEATURES AND ANALYSIS

====================

For more features and analysis selected by the Program team, visit:

http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:oped/

 

Studying Facebook: send in the scientists

----------------------------------------------------------------------

In this article at Bloomberg, mathematician Cathy O'Neil argues that an army of scientists should be sent in during the upcoming 2018 US midterm elections to study Facebook's contention that people can trust it not to let its network undermine democracy. O'Neil proposes A/B testing of headlines and other scientific tests to move the discussion from ideology to science. We need to demand more studies, O'Neil concludes. FactCheck analyzes Facebook's February announcement that it would give independent scholars access to user data so they can study the role it plays in elections. The initiative is backed by seven foundations, who will not have access to the data; peer review and proposal selection will be managed by the Social Science Research Council.

Bloomberg: https://bloom.bg/2IAepNG

FactCheck: http://bit.ly/2KiXIfuj

 

Iran: The far-reaching effects of the Telegram ban

----------------------------------------------------------------------

In this article at Wired, Lily Hay Newman discusses the impact of Iran's ban of the secure communications app  Telegram on the country's citizens. A detailed report from the Center for Human Rights in Iran has collected dozens of first-hand accounts and finds that although many Iranians continue to use Telegram via circumvention tools such as VPNs, the ban is interfering with free speech, journalism, and political campaigning, and harming businesses that depended on it - including government employees.

Wired: http://bit.ly/2IBV52v

 

Mexico: Government, exclusive spyware, and civil society surveillance

----------------------------------------------------------------------

In this video clip at The Citizen Lab, R3D director Luis Fernando Garcia discusses Mexico's use of government-exclusive spyware, intended to stop terrorism and serious crime, to illegally target at least 22 people -  journalists, opposition politicians, and civil society actors - working to expose human rights abuses. Garcia hopes the exposure will provide an opportunity to hold those responsible to account and to create a precedent to apply to other human rights abuses in Mexico.
Citizen Lab: http://bit.ly/2Mw1Cyc

 

Internet of Things provides new vector for domestic abusers

----------------------------------------------------------------------

In this article at the New York Times, Nellie Bowles reports that Internet of Things cameras, thermostats, digital locks, and doorbells are providing domestic abusers with new tools for harassment, monitoring, revenge, and control. In 30 interviews, Bowles found that even when a partner had left the home, the devices often remained behind and continued to provide a vector for intimidation and confusion. Turning everything off may just isolate the victim and escalate the violence. In a few cases, medical personnel have simply thought the victim was crazy.

New York Times: https://nyti.ms/2lI7r09
 

"Deepfake" manipulated videos progress towards realism

----------------------------------------------------------------------

In this article at Gizmodo, George Dvorsky finds at the annual SIGGRAPH that the quality of "deepfake" videos - that is, super-realistic manipulated videos - is improving faster than anyone thought possible. The new research system Deep Video Portraits uses generative neural networks to transfer a source actor's facial expressions and movements to a target actor (such as a world leader). TechCrunch reports that the authentication startup Truepic has raised $8 million to work on identifying Deepfakes. At the Verge, James Vincent reports that Adobe is using machine learning to automate digital forensics and spot edited images (such as those its Photoshop product creates). Finally, in an essay at Vice, Samantha Cole argues that media's focus on political hoaxes has drawn attention away from the women the original Deepfakes, a Reddit user, harmed in creating fake pornography. Neither the women whose faces he used nor the pornography actors whose filmed bodies he appropriated gave their consent.

Gizmodo: http://bit.ly/2KqyuLv

TechCrunch: https://tcrn.ch/2tOjEUq

Verge: http://bit.ly/2yROscT

Vice: http://bit.ly/2IBhInQ

 

UK: Businesses opt out of cash

----------------------------------------------------------------------

In this article at the Guardian, Tony Naylor considers the growing trend toward cashlessness among British pubs and restaurants, fueled in part by bank closures and in part by concerns about safety and cost. Critics complain that cash-free policies risk excluding people who lack bank accounts or smartphones, and may allow restaurant owners to pocket staff tips. However, also at the Guardian, David Crouch reports that the central bank governor of Sweden, the country nearest to becoming cashless, has called for legislation to ensure that the public sector retains control over the ability to make and receive payments and to ensure that payments can continue if technological systems fail. At the Spectator, Ross Clark, the author of The War on Cash, argues that a cashless world would be a disaster because it will fail to eliminate crime or tax fraud, and would enable politicians and central banks to impose negative interest rates.

Guardian (UK): http://bit.ly/2Kt3kTD

Guardian (Sweden): http://bit.ly/2yUstC8

Spectator: http://bit.ly/2lHJPZi

 

***

 

DIARY

==============

To see more events recommended by the Information Program team, visit:

https://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:events/. If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

 

LIBER Annual Conference

----------------------------------------

July 4-6, 2018

Lille, France

The 47th annual conference of the Association of European Research Libraries (LIBER) will include plenary sessions with top international speakers, presentations on current research, posters, and an exhibition of products and services for the library sector, as well as a comprehensive social programme.

http://bit.ly/2zFcbbU

 

The Circle of HOPE

----------------------------------------

July 20-22, 2018

New York, NY, USA

Organized by 2600 Magazine, the 12th biennial Hackers on Planet Earth conference celebrates the hacker spirit. Talks typically feature new ways of examining and dissecting technology to reveal inconvenient truths.

http://bit.ly/2BbzJpM

 

Defcon

----------------------------------------

August 9-12, 2018

Las Vegas, NV, USA

The heart of the DEF CON 26 theme is the concept of the counterfuture. The counterfuture is the open-source alternative to totalitarian dystopia; a world where we use tech and ingenuity for empowerment and connection rather than isolation and control.

http://bit.ly/2A2ojUE

 

VOX-Pol Third Biennial Conference

----------------------------------------

August 20-21, 2018

Amsterdam, The Netherlands

The VOX-Pol Network of Excellence (NoE) is a European Union Framework Programme 7 (FP7)-funded academic research network focused on researching the prevalence, contours, functions, and impacts of Violent Online Political Extremism and responses to it.c

http://bit.ly/2Hhzj3Q

 

World Library and Information Congress

----------------------------------------

August 24-30, 2018

Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

The 84th edition of the World Library and Information Congress has the theme, "Transform Libraries, Transform Societies" with the additional tagline, "Reaching out to the hard to reach", which was chosen in recognition of the critical role played by libraries in the development of a nation, particularly in their ability to transform societies.

http://bit.ly/2qSXIta

 

Human Rights Measurement Initiative (HRMI) co-design workshop

----------------------------------------

September 12 - 14, 2018

Johannesburg, South Africa

Co-hosted with Amnesty International, this workshop will develop innovative and collaborative approaches for using human rights data for impact, and agree on the next steps for HRMI's expansion of country and rights coverage.

http://bit.ly/2JwLWO6

 

SciELO 20 Years Conference

----------------------------------------

September 26-28, 2018

São Paulo, Brazil

In 2018, the SciELO Program will celebrate 20 years of operation, in full alignment with the advances of open science. The conference will address and debate the main political, methodological, and technological issues and trends that define today's state of the art in scholarly communication. These issues will also be shaping the future of the universal openness of scholarly publishing and its relationship with today's Open Access journals, in particular those of the SciELO Network.

http://bit.ly/2FlpVzU

 

Global Congress on Intellectual Property and the Public Interest V

----------------------------------------

September 27-29

Washington, DC, US

The Global Congress is the main meeting of a global network of over 800 researchers, activists, and practitioners who work on the intersection of intellectual property and promotion of the public interest. The core goal is to promote evidence-based policy-making by fostering partnerships between academics and policy advocates from around the world.

http://bit.ly/2sSuVnn

 

Amsterdam Privacy Conference

----------------------------------------

October 5-9, 2018

Amsterdam, Netherlands

APC 2018 brings together researchers, practitioners, policy makers and professionals in the field of privacy to share insights, exchange ideas and formulate, discuss and answer the challenging privacy questions that lie ahead of us. The goal of the conference is to bring together academics, policy makers, journalists, and practitioners to promote active discussion on timely topics, and foster debate on privacy issues between participants from various backgrounds and perspectives.

http://bit.ly/2ucbFEu

 

International Conference of Data Protection and Privacy Commissioners

----------------------------------------

October 22-26, 2018

Brussels, Belgium

The 40th version of this event will be hosted by the European Data Protection Supervisor (EDPS), Giovanni Buttarelli and the chair of the Commission for Personal Data Protection of the Republic of Bulgaria, Ventsislav Karadjov. The conference is expected to focus on the recently launched international debate on the ethical dimension of data protection in the digital era. Accompanying conference events will also take place in Bulgaria.

http://bit.ly/2B1bX38

 

Meeting of the Minds Summit 2018

----------------------------------------

November 27-29, 2018

Sacramento, CA, USA

The 12th annual Meeting of the Minds annual summit will spotlight tools and best practices working for smart city leaders across the globe. The event focuses on emerging and tested urban sustainability solutions which are scalable, replicable, and transferable for cities and regions. Discussions are rooted in a deep understanding of technology and equity as key drivers for smart cities.

http://bit.ly/2N80py1

 

Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection 2019

----------------------------------------

January 30 - February 1, 2019

Brussels, Belgium

The 12th international CPDP conference is accepting submissions for panel and session proposals until June 21, 2018.

http://bit.ly/2sSQ02x

 

We Robot 2019

----------------------------------------

April 11-13, 2019

Miami, Florida, US

We Robot is an interdisciplinary conference on the legal and policy questions relating to robots. The increasing sophistication of robots and their widespread deployment everywhere - from the home, to hospitals, to public spaces, and even to the battlefield - disrupts existing legal regimes and requires new thinking on policy issues. The conference fosters conversations between the people designing, building, and deploying robots, and the people who design or influence the legal and social structures in which robots will operate.

http://bit.ly/2x6T3XD

 

Global Privacy Summit 2019

----------------------------------------

May 2-3. 2019

Washington, DC

The annual conference of the International Association of Privacy Professionals. Intended for anyone who works in privacy anywhere across the globs, whether they work in the public or private sector.

http://bit.ly/2tNnJbP

 

re:publica 2019

----------------------------------------

May 6-8, 2019

Berlin, Germany

The re:publica in Berlin is Europe's biggest conference on topics concerning digitization and society while also being one of the world's most exceptional festivals on digital culture. Since its beginnings in 2007 with 700 bloggers in attendance, it has grown into an international society conference. In 2017 it had 9,000 national and international participants from all areas of society.

http://bit.ly/2GMXl6o

 

 

***

 

Hear more from the Information Program!

================================

If you want to hear more from the Information Program team each week, consider subscribing to our shared bookmarks using this RSS feed:

http://feeds.pinboard.in/rss/secret:95194ab804ccccac713b/u:osi_info_program/

 

You can also read more about our work on the Open Society Foundations website: http://www.opensocietyfoundations.org/about/programs/information-program

 

Hear less from the Information Program!

================================

If you wish to subscribe to this fortnightly digest, please send an email with the subject line "Subscribe" to infonewsdigest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

 

If you wish to unsubscribe from this fortnightly digest, please send an email with the subject line "Unsubscribe" to info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

 

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Additionally, it uses the bit.ly URL shortening service, which operates under the following privacy policy: http://bit.ly/pages/privacy/

 

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0

License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/

 

Open Society Foundation, part of the Open Society Foundations, is a company limited by guarantee registered in England and Wales (company number 4571628) and a registered charity (charity number 1105069). Its registered office address is 7th Floor, Millbank Tower, 21-24 Millbank, London SW1P 4QP

 

 

News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week ending 15 June 2018

====================================================

The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF. Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.


Our staff, advisers and major grantees tweet at http://bit.ly/13j5fjq. Current and former grantees featured in this issue: EFF, Open Rights Group.

NEWS

=====

For breaking news stories, visit: http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:news/


Amazon partners with law enforcement on cheap facial recognition

----------------------------------------------------------------------

At the Washington Post, Elizabeth Dwoskin reports that documents obtained by the American Civil Liberties Union of Northern California reveal that Amazon is selling - for minimal amounts - facial recognition tools known as "Rekognition" and related consulting services - to law enforcement agencies in Oregon and Orlando, Florida. A coalition of civil rights groups, including ACLU, EFF, and Human Rights Watch, has called on the company to end the program, which they argue could lead to increased surveillance of vulnerable communities. Matt Wood, the general manager of artificial intelligence at Amazon, has published a blog posting defending the company's decision. At Democracy Now, Center for Media Justice co-founder Malkia Cyril calls the program "terrifying" and inherently discriminatory.

Washington Post: https://wapo.st/2JxKxXN

Amazon: https://amzn.to/2JQRkLl

Democracy Now: http://bit.ly/2JNh9Mg


Max Schrems sues Google and Facebook over "forced consent"

----------------------------------------------------------------------

At The Register, Rebecca Hill reports that Austrian privacy activist Max Schrems celebrated May 25, the first day of enforcement of the EU's General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), by using his NOYB non-profit organization to file lawsuits against Google and Facebook, along with Facebook subsidiaries WhatsApp and Instagram. Schrems' complaints argue that while the companies have introduced new privacy policies to comply with GDPR, the consent mechanisms do not meet the regulation's standards for specific consent.

Register: http://bit.ly/2JQhtdk


US: FBI caught overstating encryption problem

----------------------------------------------------------------------

At the Washington Post, Devlin Barrett reports that FBI director Christopher A. Wray has repeatedly overstated its concerns about encrypted cellphones. Instead of the nearly 7,800 devices the agency claimed investigators were locked out of in 2017, the true number is more likely to be between 1,000 and 2,000. The claim formed part of a campaign to prevent digital communications from "going dark" by ensuring law enforcement access to encrypted communications.

Washington Post: https://wapo.st/2HHyMYY


Tanzania orders unregistered bloggers to shut down

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Africa News reports that Tanzania has ordered all unregistered bloggers to shut down under new regulations coming into force in Tanzania that require all bloggers to apply for an online license by June 15. Registration costs bloggers and owners of online forums such as YouTube channels up to $900, approximately equal to the country's per capita income. Those convicted of failure to comply with the regulations face fines of at least $2,200 and 12 months in prison, or both. At Quartz Africa, Abdi Latif Dahir reports that among the closures is one of Tanzania's top homegrown online platforms, Jamii Forums. Founded in 2006, Jamii has been called the "Swahili version of Wikileaks" and the "Tanzanian Reddit". One of its founders appeared in court more than 50 times in 2017, and the site has been influential in exposing government corruption.

Africa News: http://bit.ly/2JLnsQp

Quartz: http://bit.ly/2t2wgHd


Brazil: Data protection law passes Lower House

----------------------------------------------------------------------

At America's Quarterly, Robert Muggah and Louise Marie Hurel report that the Brazilian' Lower House has passed legislation that would require all public and private entities operating in the country to secure users' and clients' consent to store their personal data. If approved by the Senate, although the law doesn't meet the standard set by the EU's General Data Protection Regulation, it will include many provisions to protect privacy and limit discriminatory profiling; it will also create a Data Protection Authority and a National Council for the Protection of personal Data. At G1, Marília Marques reports that after a three-month investigation the Public Ministry of the Federal District has found that the Federal Data Processing Service (Serpro) has been marketing and selling Brazilian's personal data. The case has been referred to the Federal Public Ministry.

America's Quarterly: http://bit.ly/2y5lztl

G1 (Portuguese): http://bit.ly/2t1YoKE

Google Translate (English): http://bit.ly/2JxKVFJ


European Parliament will vote June 20 on Copyright Directive

----------------------------------------------------------------------

The BBC reports that on June 20 the European Parliament will vote on the EU's proposed new Copyright Directive. Of particular concern is Article 13, which dozens of campaigning groups including Copyright4Creativity, the Open Rights Group, and EFF have warned could put an end to user-generated memes, remixes, and other content on the web by requiring platforms to filter out any uploaded content that violates copyright. At the Wikimedia blog, Jan Gerlach explains in detail the problems with Article 13: filters are generally overbroad; their use tends to expand into other areas not originally envisaged ("mission creep"); and automated content detection systems are expensive, disadvantaging start-ups and small sites. Communia, a network of activists, researchers, and practitioners from ten EU countries, proposes that the European Parliament should instead adopt the opinion of the Internal Market and Consumer Protection Committee (IMCO), which has also been adopted by the Civil Liberties Committee (LIBE) and would limit Article 13's negative effects.

BBC: https://bbc.in/2Mls7qP

Wikimedia: http://bit.ly/2t4hXls

Communia: http://bit.ly/2sSBZQR


AI researchers boycott new Nature journal

----------------------------------------------------------------------

At the Guardian, machine learning researcher Neil Lawrence reports that more than 3,000 AI researchers have signed a pledge to boycott Springer Nature's new for-profit journal, Nature Machine Intelligence. Lawrence argues that since taxpayers fund his research they should not have to pay again to read the results, and that researchers at less well-funded universities deserve equal access.

Guardian: http://bit.ly/2LIvKGe



FEATURES AND ANALYSIS

====================

For more features and analysis selected by the Program team, visit:

http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:oped/


Google's AI principles

----------------------------------------------------------------------

In this blog posting, Google CEO Sundar Pichai publishes the company's AI principles. These include creating social benefits, avoiding unfair bias, and testing for safety, and include values such as accountability, privacy, and scientific excellence. The posting also lists applications the company will not pursue: weapons, surveillance outside of internationally accepted norms, and technologies likely to cause overall harm. At Jacobin Mag, Ben Tarnoff interviews one of the Google employees who led the successful campaign to get the company to promise not to renew its Project Maven contract with the Pentagon, which uses machine learning to improve the targeting of drone strikes. A separate blog posting outlines the company's recommended practices for building AI systems. Finally, on his blog MIT Media Lab director Joi Ito discusses the need to incorporate ethics alongside the optimism characteristic of research at the boundaries of science and technology.

Google (principles): http://bit.ly/2sSYiFQ

Jacobin Mag: http://bit.ly/2t4vdXc

Google (responsibility): http://bit.ly/2HIjGlZ

Media Lab: http://bit.ly/2sSAmCI


Why Americans' location data is no longer private

----------------------------------------------------------------------

In this blog posting, investigative security journalist Brian Krebs studies the regulatory and technical background leading up to the LocationSmart breach. In mid-May, Krebs discovered that LocationSmart, a US-based aggregator of real-time mobile device location data, had been leaking location data for customers of all the major US mobile carriers via its website in real time without consent or the need for any form of authentication or authorization. It's not clear how the Federal Trade Commission will handle this or any of the other similar leaks involving T-Mobile, Comcast, and Securus Technologies. Worst of all, Krebs writes, even though Carnegie-Mellon researcher Robert Xiao has demonstrated that it's easy to look up the precise location of any mobile number in the US, public interest faded quickly.

Krebs: http://bit.ly/2JDPB8L


Israel's law to ban filming soldiers

----------------------------------------------------------------------

In this Guardian article, Roy Greenslade argues that Israel should abandon proposals for a law that would prohibit photographing or filming Israeli Defense Forces "with the intention of undermining the spirit" of the army and make violations punishable by five to ten years in prison. Images, he says, leave indelible truth in viewers' minds even when the text is filled with propaganda. At TheNewArab, CJ Werleman explains the background: the 2014 Israeli siege in Gaza was one of the first wars to be photographed by amateurs who distributed their images via social media.

Guardian: http://bit.ly/2JxLYFF

TheNewArab: http://bit.ly/2l4bGTl


Twenty years of surveillance

----------------------------------------------------------------------

At this page are hosted the video streams from the UK's Foundation for Information Policy Research 20th birthday celebration, a one-day conference outlining the past, present, and future of surveillance and the internet. Of particular note are Ross Anderson's introduction, former MP Julian Huppert's account of his experiences during the debates over the Communications Data Bill and Data Retention and Investigatory Powers Act, philosopher Onora O'Neill's provocations, and revelations by Jen Persson, whose NGO defenddigitalme finds that UK's Department of Education collects as many as 400 data items per pupil and sells them on to commercial firms while refusing to grant subject access requests by schoolkids and their parents. At net.wars, Wendy M. Grossman has a summary of the day.

YouTube: http://bit.ly/2sTW8WB

net.wars: http://bit.ly/2MkmRE1


Platform business models and their influence on workers' well-being

----------------------------------------------------------------------

In this Medium article, Marija Gavrilov summarizes the International Labour Office's Future of Work research paper, which examines the business models and impact on workers of platforms such as Uber and Deliveroo. The report analyzes the platforms' propensity to contribute to worker exploitation, and recommends that regulators focus on enabling worker agency and reducing platform control, which is being eroded by practices such as refusing to share data on which decisions are made.

Medium: http://bit.ly/2MmhCn2

ILO (report, PDF): http://bit.ly/2JIrUfH


Our phones are listening

----------------------------------------------------------------------

In this article at Vice, Sam Nichols examines the widespread belief that Facebook uses its smartphone app to listen to our conversations and serve up related ads. After some experimentation, he concludes it's true: although Google and Apple require a trigger to activate Siri and OK Google, third-party apps may have thousands of triggers even though Facebook and others deny they listen. At the Guardian, Sam Wolfson reports that an Amazon Alexa device recorded a private conversation between its owner and her husband and sent it to a random contact in their address book. An Amazon spokesman confirmed the privacy breach but offered no explanation.

Vice: http://bit.ly/2t9usfV

Guardian: http://bit.ly/2ycBk1Q



***


DIARY

==============

To see more events recommended by the Information Program team, visit:

https://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:events/. If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.


22nd International Conference on Electronic Publishing

----------------------------------------

June 22-24, 2018

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

The theme of ELPUB 2018 is Connecting the Knowledge Commons: From Projects to Sustainable Infrastructure. The question of sustainability in the open access movement has been widely debated, yet satisfactory answers have yet to be generated. In the past, ELPUB has featured research results in various aspects of digital publishing, involving a diverse international community of librarians, developers, publishers, entrepreneurs, administrators and researchers across the disciplines in the sciences and the humanities. It is unique as a platform for both researchers, professionals and the broader community. The conference contains a multi-track presentation of refereed papers as well as invited keynotes, special sessions, demonstrations, and poster presentations.

http://bit.ly/2rB60Ef


LIBER Annual Conference

----------------------------------------

July 4-6, 2018

Lille, France

The 47th annual conference of the Association of European Research Libraries (LIBER) will include plenary sessions with top international speakers, presentations on current research, posters, and an exhibition of products and services for the library sector, as well as a comprehensive social programme.

http://bit.ly/2zFcbbU


The Circle of HOPE

----------------------------------------

July 20-22, 2018

New York, NY, USA

Organized by 2600 Magazine, the 12th biennial Hackers on Planet Earth conference celebrates the hacker spirit. Talks typically feature new ways of examining and dissecting technology to reveal inconvenient truths.

http://bit.ly/2BbzJpM


Defcon

----------------------------------------

August 9-12, 2018

Las Vegas, NV, USA

The heart of the DEF CON 26 theme is the concept of the counterfuture. The counterfuture is the open-source alternative to totalitarian dystopia; a world where we use tech and ingenuity for empowerment and connection rather than isolation and control.

http://bit.ly/2A2ojUE


VOX-Pol Third Biennial Conference

----------------------------------------

August 20-21, 2018

Amsterdam, The Netherlands

The VOX-Pol Network of Excellence (NoE) is a European Union Framework Programme 7 (FP7)-funded academic research network focused on researching the prevalence, contours, functions, and impacts of Violent Online Political Extremism and responses to it.c

http://bit.ly/2Hhzj3Q


World Library and Information Congress

----------------------------------------

August 24-30, 2018

Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

The 84th edition of the World Library and Information Congress has the theme, "Transform Libraries, Transform Societies" with the additional tagline, "Reaching out to the hard to reach", which was chosen in recognition of the critical role played by libraries in the development of a nation, particularly in their ability to transform societies.

http://bit.ly/2qSXIta


Human Rights Measurement Initiative (HRMI) co-design workshop

----------------------------------------

September 12 - 14, 2018

Johannesburg, South Africa

Co-hosted with Amnesty International, this workshop will develop innovative and collaborative approaches for using human rights data for impact, and agree on the next steps for HRMI's expansion of country and rights coverage.

http://bit.ly/2JwLWO6


SciELO 20 Years Conference

----------------------------------------

September 26-28, 2018

São Paulo, Brazil

In 2018, the SciELO Program will celebrate 20 years of operation, in full alignment with the advances of open science. The conference will address and debate the main political, methodological, and technological issues and trends that define today's state of the art in scholarly communication. These issues will also be shaping the future of the universal openness of scholarly publishing and its relationship with today's Open Access journals, in particular those of the SciELO Network.

http://bit.ly/2FlpVzU


Global Congress on Intellectual Property and the Public Interest V

----------------------------------------

September 27-29

Washington, DC, US

The Global Congress is the main meeting of a global network of over 800 researchers, activists, and practitioners who work on the intersection of intellectual property and promotion of the public interest. The core goal is to promote evidence-based policy-making by fostering partnerships between academics and policy advocates from around the world.

http://bit.ly/2sSuVnn


Amsterdam Privacy Conference

----------------------------------------

October 5-9, 2018

Amsterdam, Netherlands

APC 2018 brings together researchers, practitioners, policy makers and professionals in the field of privacy to share insights, exchange ideas and formulate, discuss and answer the challenging privacy questions that lie ahead of us. The goal of the conference is to bring together academics, policy makers, journalists, and practitioners to promote active discussion on timely topics, and foster debate on privacy issues between participants from various backgrounds and perspectives.

http://bit.ly/2ucbFEu


International Conference of Data Protection and Privacy Commissioners

----------------------------------------

October 22-26, 2018

Brussels, Belgium

The 40th version of this event will be hosted by the European Data Protection Supervisor (EDPS), Giovanni Buttarelli and the chair of the Commission for Personal Data Protection of the Republic of Bulgaria, Ventsislav Karadjov. The conference is expected to focus on the recently launched international debate on the ethical dimension of data protection in the digital era. Accompanying conference events will also take place in Bulgaria.

http://bit.ly/2B1bX38


Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection 2019

----------------------------------------

January 30 - February 1, 2019

Brussels, Belgium

The 12th international CPDP conference is accepting submissions for panel and session proposals until June 21, 2018.

http://bit.ly/2sSQ02x


We Robot 2019

----------------------------------------

April 11-13, 2019

Miami, Florida, US

We Robot is an interdisciplinary conference on the legal and policy questions relating to robots. The increasing sophistication of robots and their widespread deployment everywhere - from the home, to hospitals, to public spaces, and even to the battlefield - disrupts existing legal regimes and requires new thinking on policy issues. The conference fosters conversations between the people designing, building, and deploying robots, and the people who design or influence the legal and social structures in which robots will operate.

http://bit.ly/2x6T3XD


re:publica 2019

----------------------------------------

May 6-8, 2019

Berlin, Germany

The re:publica in Berlin is Europe's biggest conference on topics concerning digitization and society while also being one of the world's most exceptional festivals on digital culture. Since its beginnings in 2007 with 700 bloggers in attendance, it has grown into an international society conference. In 2017 it had 9,000 national and international participants from all areas of society.

http://bit.ly/2GMXl6o



***


Hear more from the Information Program!

================================

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News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week ending 25 May 2018
====================================================
The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF. Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

Our staff, advisers and major grantees tweet at http://bit.ly/13j5fjq. Current and former grantees featured in this issue: Benetech, EFF.

NEWS
=====
For breaking news stories, visit: http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:news/

US Senate overrules Federal Communications Commission on network neutrality
----------------------------------------------------------------------
At Ars Technica, Jon Brodkin reports that on May 9 the US Senate voted 52-47 to reverse the Federal Communications Commission's December 2017 repeal of network neutrality rules. The measure, a Congressional Review Act, undoes the FCC's vote; to come into force it must be approved by the House and signed by President Trump by June 11, when the FCC's repeal is due to take effect. At EFF, Ernesto Falcon explains the "discharge petition" process that will be needed to force a vote in the House, which is known to be reluctant to consider network neutrality.
Ars Technica: http://bit.ly/2IJxg9Z
EFF: http://bit.ly/2IEA0cB

Sweden cancels agreement with Elsevier over Open Access
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Times Higher Education reports that the Bibsam Consortium, which represents 85 Swedish universities and research institutes, has announced it will not renew its agreement with Elsevier when it expires on June 30. The Swedish government has said that all publicly funded research should be made freely available by 2026; the consortium says that Elsevier has not met its open access-related requirements. In balking at journal publishers' requirements, Sweden joins Germany, which has a long-running dispute with Elsevier, and France, where The Scientist reports that in March research institutions canceled their agreement with Springer rather than pay the increased subscription rates the publisher wanted.
THE: http://bit.ly/2IGVups
Scientist: http://bit.ly/2J63Eap

Brazil: São Paulo metro stations embed facial recognition
----------------------------------------------------------------------
At CityLab, Ignacio Amigo reports that the Via Quattro, the concessionary operator São Paulo Metro's Yellow Line, has experimentally installed a set of interactive platform doors that display ads and information in three stations. The doors also incorporate sensors and facial recognition in order to monitor viewers' reactions. The line, which is the only privately-run section of São Paulo's transport system, carries approximately 305,000 passengers every weekday to the three stations. Although Marco. the Brazilian Civil Rights Framework for the Internet, has a chapter covering the rights of app users, the Yellow Line monitoring is not covered. This may change soon, as a vote on the Personal Data Protection bill is pending in the lower house of the National Congress.
CityLab: http://bit.ly/2s8BW1U

India: WhatsApp plays crucial role in Karnataka state elections
----------------------------------------------------------------------
At the New York Times, Vindu Goel reports that WhatsApp played a crucial role in political campaigning in the lead-up to the May 12 elections in the Indian state of Karnataka. WhatsApp is often overlooked in the West, but in developing countries it is playing an increasingly central role in elections, both to distribute campaign messages and to sow misinformation, disruption, and sectarian tensions. Goel cites as contributing factors the loss of originating information when messages are forwarded, anonymity for users who identify themselves solely by a phone number, and the lack of transparency to outsiders because of the service's end-to-end encryption. Goel concludes that what, if any, effect WhatsApp had on Karnataka's final election results may never be clear.
New York Times: https://nyti.ms/2xd95iG

US: Court bars President Donald Trump from blocking Twitter users
----------------------------------------------------------------------
At Reuters, Brendan Pierson reports that US District Judge Naomi Reice Buchwald in New York has ruled that President Donald F. Trump, who tweets as @RealDonaldTrump, cannot legally block Twitter users because doing so violates their free speech rights under the First Amendment. Buchwald did not order Trump to unblock the users he has already blocked, but said she assumed that either he or his co-defendant and social media director, Dan Scanvino, would do so given her decision. The case was brought by the Knight First Amendment Institute at Columbia University and several Twitter users, who argued that by blocking users critical of him Trump was shutting them out of discussion in a public forum.
Reuters: https://reut.rs/2J06qOe

Benetech discontinues Martus human rights reporting software
----------------------------------------------------------------------
At its blog, Benetech reports that it intends to cease development of its 15-year-old end-to-end encrypted Martus software for human rights data collection. While Benetech remains convinced that such a system is sorely needed by the human rights community, it believes that it is not practical to move forward with it given current technical requirements. Benetech stresses that it is not aware of existing vulnerabilities in the software and that the Martus backup server will continue to be available for use. The group is beginning to coordinate conversations to identify and address gaps and needs around human rights documentation.
Benetech: http://bit.ly/2kmxB7Y

Researchers devise inaudible commands that drive voice assistants
----------------------------------------------------------------------
At the New York Times, Craig S. Smith reports that researchers can send secret audio instructions the human ear can't detect to the speech-driven devices Siri (Apple), Alexa (Amazon), and Assistant (Google). Researchers in both China and the US have shown they can secretly activate these systems on smartphones and smart speakers and, simply by playing music, make them dial phone numbers or open websites - and, potentially, unlock doors, wire money, or make purchases online. All three companies say they have security measures in place including voice recognition and device locking. However, many people leave their devices unlocked, and interference techniques are improving all the time. So far, none have been seen in the wild. At the Transatlantic Consumer Dialogue blog, Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood communications and operations manager Melissa Campbell advises parents not to buy Amazon's new Echo Dot Kids for both developmental and privacy reasons.
New York Times: https://nyti.ms/2LrJe9V
TACD: http://bit.ly/2s7o8oE


FEATURES AND ANALYSIS
====================
For more features and analysis selected by the Program team, visit:
http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:oped/

The first real look at Facebook's community standards enforcement
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article at Gizmodo, Rhett Jones discusses Facebook's first bi-annual content moderation report, which shows that the company's moderation systems caught more objectionable content in the first quarter of 2018 than in the last quarter of 2017. However, because Facebook can't say how big the problem is, it's hard to determine whether the company's algorithmic systems are improving or whether the amount of objectionable content is increasing. Facebook estimates that fake accounts represent 3% to 4% of its estimated monthly active user base of 2.2 billion; in the first quarter of 2018 the company removed 583 million fake accounts. About 21 million pieces of content classed as nudity and sexual content were removed in each quarter; 38% of hate speech was removed before being reported by users. EFF's Jillian C. York praises the company's first steps toward transparency, but would like greater clarity about the reasons for content deletion, the mistakes moderators and automated systems make, and differentiation between the removal of fake accounts versus suspensions for other violations.
Gizmodo: http://bit.ly/2Lqxaph
EFF: http://bit.ly/2xcPpMe

Poking the intellectual property bear
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this Wired article, Lawrence Lessig opposes the Classics Act, which would create a new digital performance right for musical recordings made before 1972. This new right, Lessig argues, is effectively a term extension, as the new right in these recordings would be protected until 2067, 144 years after some of them were created. Archives streaming early recordings that are currently in the public domain would now have to clear permission. The bill has passed the House of Representatives and is pending in the Senate; 40 professors of intellectual property have signed a letter asking Congress to reject the act. In a follow-up at Medium, Lessig addresses some of the most common attacks on him and his arguments.
https://www.wired.com/story/congress-latest-move-to-extend-copyright-protection-is-misguided/
Medium: http://bit.ly/2IIQHzN

The Selfish Ledger
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this video clip obtained by The Verge, Google conducts a thought experiment to imagine a future in which collections of information known as "ledgers", like "selfish genes", use individuals to meet their own goals. In this imaginary future, through total data collection Google guides the behavior of individuals toward set goals and entire populations to solve global problems. The company explained that the clip is intentionally disturbing to provoke internal discussion but is not related to any current or future products. Creating a spectrum of "deservingness", Eubanks finds, often means prioritizing cost-effectiveness over need, and these systems are based on data drawn only from those who use the public programs, adding further discriminatory effects.
Verge: http://bit.ly/2J1khDX

Algorithms won't make poverty go away
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this feature at the Guardian, Virginia Eubanks, author of Automating Inequality: How High-Tech Tools Profile, Police, and Punish the Poor, travels the US investigating the use of AI-driven decision systems for allocating scarce resources to poor people. Automated eligibility systems remove discretion from caseworkers and replace welfare offices with forms and privatized call centers; the result is that often the people who need the services are barred from using them. In a video clip at Data & Society, Safiya Umoja Noble, the author of Algorithms of Oppression, discusses the social problem of data discrimination and the biased search algorithms that discriminate against women of color.
Guardian: http://bit.ly/2kijj8l
Data & Society: http://bit.ly/2ki56bp

The problem with Chinese GPS
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this posting at Now I Know, Dan Lewis discusses discrepancies in Chinese digital maps such as those available at Google due to technical differences between the World Geodetic System 1984, the basis for most of the world's mapping and guidance systems, and China's own GCJ-02 cartography system. China, Lewis writes, regards map data as a matter of national security, applies an obfuscation algorithm, and requires map-makers to obtain a cartography license. Translation tools exist, but they're hard to find, not that reliable, and against Chinese law.
Now I Know: http://bit.ly/2IIedNn

The untold story of Japan's secret spy agency
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article at The Intercept, Ryan Gallegher explores the past and present inner workings of Japan's equivalent of the US National Security Agency, C1. The article is based on a joint investigation by The Intercept and Japanese broadcaster NHK, beginning with the first internal document from Japan's surveillance agency that has ever been disclosed, which formed part of the cache of documents leaked by Edward Snowden. Work at C1's base at Tachiarai, about 700 miles southwest of Tokyo seems to focus on monitoring the activities of foreign countries by intercepting communications and data passing among the 200-plus satellites visible from there. Helping C1 is the specialist technical Ministry of Defense-connected J6 unit, which among other things analyzes malware and develops anti-hacking countermeasures.
Intercept: http://bit.ly/2J1G8v6


***

DIARY
==============
To see more events recommended by the Information Program team, visit:
https://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:events/. If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

Foundation for Information Policy Research 20th anniversary
----------------------------------------
May 29, 2018
Cambridge, UK
For its 20th anniversary, the UK's Foundation for Information Policy Research, founded to campaign against 1990s proposals for surveillance laws, will host a debate in Cambridge featuring representatives of NGOs and GCHQ, academia and DeepMind, the press and the Cabinet Office. Should governments be able to break the encryption on our phones? Are we entitled to any privacy for our health and social care records? And what can be done about fake news? If the Internet's going to be censored, who do we trust to do it?
http://bit.ly/2I65WT2

Privacy Law Scholars
----------------------------------------
May 30-31
Washington, DC, USA
PLSC is a paper workshop with the goal of improving and providing support for in-progress scholarship. To achieve this, PLSC assembles a wide array of privacy law scholars and practitioners from around the world to discuss the papers. Scholars from many disciplines (psychology/economics, sociology, philosophy, political science, computer science, and even math) also participate.
http://bit.ly/2zgypRQ

Internet Shutdowns in Africa Workshop
----------------------------------------
June 7-8, 2018
Johannesburg, South Africa
Internet shutdowns in Africa doubled between 2015 and 2016, affecting citizens in 11 countries on the continent. While the number declined slightly in 2017, governments that resorted to disrupting the internet did so more frequently and for longer periods. The justifications are diverse, from anti-government protests to Cameroon, to exam cheating in Ethiopia, concerns about election-related violence in Uganda, and quelling social unrest in Zimbabwe. This two-day conference is aimed at sparking in-depth and productive conversations about this issue. It is organized by the ERC-funded ConflictNet programme at the University of Oxford's Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy, the CSLS, the Bonavero Institute for Human Rights, and the Department of Journalism, Film and Television at the University of Johannesburg's School of Communication. 
http://bit.ly/2HkVpSX

Personal Democracy Forum
----------------------------------------
June 7-8, 2018
New York, NY, USA
Since 2004, Personal Democracy Forum ("PDF") has been the go-to place to tap into a community that believes in the power of technology to change politics and governance for the better.  This year's PDF, the 15th, will focus on meaningful collaboration, action, and participatory learning. Our number one goal is to plug attendees into the process of change-making. This year's theme, How We Make Good, will focus on how we turn our commitments - to democracy and ensuring that tech works for the public good - into concrete action.
http://bit.ly/2FjLAbD

22nd International Conference on Electronic Publishing
----------------------------------------
June 22-24, 2018
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
The theme of ELPUB 2018 is Connecting the Knowledge Commons: From Projects to Sustainable Infrastructure. The question of sustainability in the open access movement has been widely debated, yet satisfactory answers have yet to be generated. In the past, ELPUB has featured research results in various aspects of digital publishing, involving a diverse international community of librarians, developers, publishers, entrepreneurs, administrators and researchers across the disciplines in the sciences and the humanities. It is unique as a platform for both researchers, professionals and the broader community. The conference contains a multi-track presentation of refereed papers as well as invited keynotes, special sessions, demonstrations, and poster presentations.
http://bit.ly/2rB60Ef

LIBER Annual Conference
----------------------------------------
July 4-6, 2018
Lille, France
The 47th annual conference of the Association of European Research Libraries (LIBER) will include plenary sessions with top international speakers, presentations on current research, posters, and an exhibition of products and services for the library sector, as well as a comprehensive social programme.
http://bit.ly/2zFcbbU

The Circle of HOPE
----------------------------------------
July 20-22, 2018
New York, NY, USA
Organized by 2600 Magazine, the 12th biennial Hackers on Planet Earth conference celebrates the hacker spirit. Talks typically feature new ways of examining and dissecting technology to reveal inconvenient truths.
http://bit.ly/2BbzJpM

Defcon
----------------------------------------
August 9-12, 2018
Las Vegas, NV, USA
The heart of the DEF CON 26 theme is the concept of the counterfuture. The counterfuture is the open-source alternative to totalitarian dystopia; a world where we use tech and ingenuity for empowerment and connection rather than isolation and control.
http://bit.ly/2A2ojUE

VOX-Pol Third Biennial Conference
----------------------------------------
August 20-21, 2018
Amsterdam, The Netherlands
The VOX-Pol Network of Excellence (NoE) is a European Union Framework Programme 7 (FP7)-funded academic research network focused on researching the prevalence, contours, functions, and impacts of Violent Online Political Extremism and responses to it.c
http://bit.ly/2Hhzj3Q

World Library and Information Congress
----------------------------------------
August 24-30, 2018
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
The 84th edition of the World Library and Information Congress has the theme, "Transform Libraries, Transform Societies" with the additional tagline, "Reaching out to the hard to reach", which was chosen in recognition of the critical role played by libraries in the development of a nation, particularly in their ability to transform societies.
http://bit.ly/2qSXIta

SciELO 20 Years Conference
----------------------------------------
September 26-28, 2018
São Paulo, Brazil
In 2018, the SciELO Program will celebrate 20 years of operation, in full alignment with the advances of open science. The conference will address and debate the main political, methodological, and technological issues and trends that define today's state of the art in scholarly communication. These issues will also be shaping the future of the universal openness of scholarly publishing and its relationship with today's Open Access journals, in particular those of the SciELO Network.
http://bit.ly/2FlpVzU

Amsterdam Privacy Conference
----------------------------------------
October 5-9, 2018
Amsterdam, Netherlands
APC 2018 brings together researchers, practitioners, policy makers and professionals in the field of privacy to share insights, exchange ideas and formulate, discuss and answer the challenging privacy questions that lie ahead of us. The goal of the conference is to bring together academics, policy makers, journalists, and practitioners to promote active discussion on timely topics, and foster debate on privacy issues between participants from various backgrounds and perspectives.
http://bit.ly/2ucbFEu

International Conference of Data Protection and Privacy Commissioners
----------------------------------------
October 22-26, 2018
Brussels, Belgium
The 40th version of this event will be hosted by the European Data Protection Supervisor (EDPS), Giovanni Buttarelli and the chair of the Commission for Personal Data Protection of the Republic of Bulgaria, Ventsislav Karadjov. The conference is expected to focus on the recently launched international debate on the ethical dimension of data protection in the digital era. Accompanying conference events will also take place in Bulgaria.
http://bit.ly/2B1bX38

Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection 2019
----------------------------------------
January 30 - February 1, 2019
Brussels, Belgium
The 12th international CPDP conference is accepting submissions for panel and session proposals until June 21, 2018.
http://bit.ly/2sSQ02x

We Robot 2019
----------------------------------------
April 11-13, 2019
Miami, Florida, US
We Robot is an interdisciplinary conference on the legal and policy questions relating to robots. The increasing sophistication of robots and their widespread deployment everywhere - from the home, to hospitals, to public spaces, and even to the battlefield - disrupts existing legal regimes and requires new thinking on policy issues. The conference fosters conversations between the people designing, building, and deploying robots, and the people who design or influence the legal and social structures in which robots will operate.
http://bit.ly/2x6T3XD

re:publica 2019
----------------------------------------
May 6-8, 2019
Berlin, Germany
The re:publica in Berlin is Europe's biggest conference on topics concerning digitization and society while also being one of the world's most exceptional festivals on digital culture. Since its beginnings in 2007 with 700 bloggers in attendance, it has grown into an international society conference. In 2017 it had 9,000 national and international participants from all areas of society.
http://bit.ly/2GMXl6o

***

Hear more from the Information Program!
================================
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Hear less from the Information Program!
================================
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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0
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Open Society Foundation, part of the Open Society Foundations, is a company limited by guarantee registered in England and Wales (company number 4571628) and a registered charity (charity number 1105069). Its registered office address is 7th Floor, Millbank Tower, 21-24 Millbank, London SW1P 4QP


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