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News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week ending 24 March 2017
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The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF. Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

Our staff, advisers and major grantees tweet at http://bit.ly/13j5fjq. Current and former grantees featured in this issue: EFF, mySociety, Open Rights Group, Privacy International.


NEWS
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For breaking news stories, visit: http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:news/

Prospective trade deals recycle Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement clauses
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EFF reports that some of the proposals it and other civil society organizations opposed in the now-defunct Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement are being recycled into other international trade deals. EFF flags in particular the renegotiation of the North Atlantic Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and the Asian Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP). EFF advocates opening the negotiation process to meaningful consultation with users and civil society.
EFF: http://bit.ly/2niqD6k

Pakistan: Government demands social media block "blasphemous" content
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Dawn reports that Facebook is sending a delegation to Pakistan to attempt to reach a mutual understanding following hearings in a related case at the Islamabad High Court (IHC) that claims the dissemination of blasphemous content via social media is "hurting the religious sentiments of Muslims". The IHC has ordered the government to investigate online blasphemy. Dawn also reports that Minister of the Interior Chaudhry Nisar has threatened to block all social media websites containing blasphemous content. Past government bans have included Facebook (for two weeks in 2010) and YouTube (2012-2016).
Dawn (delegation): http://bit.ly/2mxAQwN
Dawn (threat): http://bit.ly/2mxKKi3

US: "Smart" vibrator manufacturer settles privacy case
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The Guardian reports that We-Vibe, the maker of a line of Bluetooth-enabled vibrators that can be paired with a remote control app, has agreed a $3.75 million class action settlement after the company was accused of collecting data on when and how customers used its products. The lawsuit, which was filed in an Illinois federal court, alleged that the company collected detailed and personally identifiable information; about 300,000 people bought the vibrators and about a third of those paired them with the app. The security flaws were first revealed by researchers at Defcon 2016.
Guardian: http://bit.ly/2ntkPaq

Advertiser pressure mounts on Google over extremist material
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The Guardian reports that numerous major companies such as Vodafone, Sky, several banks, and the Guardian itself are either pulling their ads from Google and its YouTube subsidiary site or considering doing so. The issue: the appearance of their ads in extremist videos on YouTube. Senior Google executives were summoned to the UK's Cabinet Office last week over similar concerns. The Guardian also reports that internet analysts estimate that extremists and hate preachers have netted at least £250,000 from such advertising with $149,000 accruing to Google in commissions. This is not a new problem; the Guardian first covered it in 2012. Separately, Multiplex reports that Google apparently authorized the placement of an ad for the new Disney movie Beauty and the Beast into the voice-powered Google Home device, which included the movie in its daily news summary, and compares the move to earlier advertising mistakes.
Guardian (advertisers): http://bit.ly/2nO5Usm
Guardian (money): http://bit.ly/2nikYgt
Guardian (2012): http://bit.ly/2mxxKZO
Multiplex: http://bit.ly/2mxJbjW

Kenya: Communications surveillance practices
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Privacy International reports that the Kenyan National Intelligence Service has direct access to communications networks across Kenya and is sharing the data it collects with the police forces essentially without oversight and outside the procedures required by Kenyan law. PI's newly-published investigation of the techniques, tools and culture of Kenyan police and intelligence agencies' communications surveillance practices finds that intercepted content and data are being used to facilitate gross human rights abuses. The consequences include eroded trust and marred anti-terrorism operations. PI calls for reform in this election year.
PI: http://bit.ly/2n02Nd1

Scotland: Government drops university identity register
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The Open Rights Group reports that the Scottish government has dropped plans to use the National Health Service central register as the basis for a national identity register. ORG goes on to call for Scotland to drop its poorly-documented identity system, which comprises a unique citizen reference number assigned to each citizen at birth and a national entitlement card, which is run by the private Improvement Service and which gives citizens access to government services such as bus passes, student service cards, and libraries.
ORG: http://bit.ly/2nO37iM

Paywalls damage public health
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At Medium, Lauren Maggio, Juan Pablo Alperin, Laura Moorhead, and John Willinsky report their finding that over 60% of the journal articles discussed in news stories published in 2016 were locked behind paywalls with no free PDF available on the authors' site. The typical fees of $30 to $50 an article, they argue, present too much of a barrier for the general public and the 12-month embargo allowed by the National Institutes of Health is too long. Much of this research is taxpayer-financed, and public health is being damaged by this lack of access to the evidence base.
Medium: http://bit.ly/2nOcAH6


FEATURES AND ANALYSIS
====================
For more features and analysis selected by the Program team, visit:
http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:oped/

Three challenges for the web
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In this posting, Tim Berners-Lee highlights three problems that he finds critical for the web: 1) our loss of control over our personal data; 2) the ease of spreading misinformation; and 3) the need for transparency about political online advertising. Working on these forms part of the World Wide Web Foundation's new five-year strategy; Berners-Lee calls for help in building "the web we want".
Web Foundation: http://bit.ly/2mZIJHL

Cataloguing the world's politicians
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In this blog posting, mySociety describes progress made by its EveryPolitician project, which by now has collected data on over 72,000 politicians from 233 countries. They go on to explain the decisions they've made in collecting the data and discuss some early projects making use of the data. The Represent.me project, for example, has built a platform for gathering opinions and votes that can be shared with politicians and constituency MPs.
mySociety: http://bit.ly/2nd1VCv

Interview with SocArXiv founder Philip Cohen
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In this blog posting, Richard Poynder interviews Philip Cohen, the founder of the SocArXiv social sciences pre-print server. Since its soft launch last summer, the server has amassed over 800 papers; it will hold its first conference in October. In the near term, Cohen intends for SocArXiv to allow new research to reach readers in a timely fashion while preserving the ability to publish in regular journals. Longer-term, he hopes to participate in the movement to build a new and better form of scholarly communications system.
Poynder: http://bit.ly/2nisnfE

Interview with Brazilian TRIPS negotiator Celso Amorim
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In this interview at Intellectual Property Watch, William New asks Brazilian minister Celso Amorim to recount his part in negotiating to secure flexibilities for developing countries in the 1994 WTO Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS). He also negotiated the landmark 2001 Doha Declaration on TRIPS and Public Health. During that time, the climate changed dramatically, first because of the advent of HIV/AIDS and then due to 9/11. Amorim worries that the new US administration will pursue unilateral sanctions, fragmenting the genuinely worldwide agreements of the past.
IP Watch: http://bit.ly/2mxRGeY

The Rise of the Weaponized Propaganda Machine
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In this piece at Medium, Berit Anderson and Brett Hovath discuss automated propaganda in global politics. Beginning with an outline of Cambridge Analytica's role in the 2016 US presidential election and its influence on Trump's ongoing policy decisions, the authors go on to examine how the various technical pieces work: data, engagement scripts, networking, and bots. Future elections, Anderson and Horvath argue, will be battles of automated behavior change. Buzzfeed offers a skeptical take on some of the claims regarding the use of behavioral targeting during the US elections. Scientific American asks whether democracy can survive these technologies. The price of personalized information, the authors write, is collective and local decision-making. Calling top-down, centralized control a solution of the past, they suggest ten principles for avoiding totalitarianism.
Medium: http://bit.ly/2nJroGt
Buzzfeed: http://bzfd.it/2nPXuB1
Scientific American: http://bit.ly/2mxMgkf

The technology industry at South by Southwest
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In this Wired article, Issie Lapowsky finds the technology industry rethinking itself at the annual Austin, Texas South by Southwest (SXSW) festival. The BBC interviews Bishop Paul Tighe, who this year became the first representative sent to SXSW by the Vatican to learn more about the digital world and to promote human values. At The Verge, Nick Statt complains that SXSW is failing to tackle hard questions. Statt also summarizes the SXSW talk by roboticist Matt Rendall, who argued that the US's failure to invest in industrial robotics may cause the country to lose out on the next industrial revolution.
Wired: http://bit.ly/2ntB47j
BBC: http://bbc.in/2ntsEgl
Verge (SXSW): http://bit.ly/2ncXlnY
Vere (investment): http://bit.ly/2nJkDo0

Palantir, Peter Thiel, Big Data, and the DHS
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In this blog posting, Edward Hasbrouck discusses recent protests at Palantir, which have seen technology industry employees object to the use of technical tools to assist the Department of Homeland Security to implement the exclusionary policies of the Trump administration. Hasbrouck explains what is known about the tools Palantir is building and their consequences when put to use.
Hasbrouck: http://bit.ly/2ntyRc0


***

DIARY
==============
To see more events recommended by the Information Program team, visit:
https://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:events/. If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

Robots Exhibition
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February 8 - September 13
London, UK
The Science Museum's 2017 robots exhibition includes robotic artifacts over five centuries, from a 16th century mechanized monk to the latest research developments. Focusing on why they exist rather than on how they work, the exhibition explores the ways robots mirror humanity and the insights they offer into our ambitions, desires and position in a rapidly changing world.
http://bit.ly/2kpgPn2

Human Rights Watch Film Festival
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March 6-June 18
London, UK; Chicago Illinois; Toronto, Canada; New York, NY
The 16 human rights documentaries included in this peripatetic festival highlight individuals and groups exhibiting courageous resilience in challenging times. Among the human rights topics represented are the integrity of the press; the experience of refugees seeking safety; and factory workers protesting chemical harms from their work in the Chinese electronics industry. Nicholas de Pencier's BLACK CODE, based on Ronald Deibert's book of the same name, follows members of Toronto-based Citizen Lab as they document civil society activism in Tibet, Syria, Brazil, and Pakistan.
http://bit.ly/2mbHEiW

Rightscon 2017
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March 29-31, 2017
Brussels, Belgium
RightsCon will tackle the most pressing issues at the intersection of technology and human rights. Session proposals are being accepted until November 25, 2016.
http://bit.ly/I2ZAUZ

We Robot
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March 31-April 1, 2017
New Haven, Connecticut
The sixth annual We Robot will be held at Yale Law School and will focus on the coming legal and policy conflicts as robots and AI become part of daily life.
http://bit.ly/2fVF2SI

ILIDE 2017
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April 3-5, 2017
Jasna, Slovakia
This year's Innovative Library in the Digital Era conference will discuss repositories and research data archiving, open science, digital humanities and digital scholarship.
http://bit.ly/2luJppU

OpenAIRE Workshop
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April 4, 2017
Barcelona, Spain
As an adjunct to the RDA plenary, the Research and Data Alliance will hold a workshop on legal issues in open research data.
http://bit.ly/2moqe1r

OER 17
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April 5-6, 2017
London, UK
This year's OER will present an opportunity for open practitioners, activists, educators, and policy makers to come together to reflect on 'The Politics of Open'. Up for discussion are questions such as: What are our current key challenges and strengths - locally, nationally, and internationally? What are our priorities - in terms of political governance, organisational and personal politics? What are the changes that we want to effect together? The conference will be chaired by social and educational technologist and Wikimedia UK Trustee Josie Fraser, and Alek Tarkowski, Director of Centrum Cyfrowe, co-founder and coordinator of Creative Commons Poland.
http://bit.ly/2k5V7bC

Research Data Alliance Plenary
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April 5-7, 2017
Barcelona, Spain
The main theme for the 9th Research Data Alliance plenary meeting, organised by the Barcelona Supercomputing Center-Centro Nacional de Supercomputación and supported by RDA Europe, will be Data Infrastructures for Open Science.
http://bit.ly/2lGBp6U

Personal Democracy Forum CEE 2017
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April 6-7
Gdansk, Poland
The 5th edition of Personal Democracy Forum will serve as a platform for exchanging ideas and experiences for people using new technologies to work for civic participation and transparency in public life in Central and Eastern Europe.
http://bit.ly/2j7q7HT

TICTeC 2017
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April 25-26, 2017
Florence, Italy
This will be the third mySociety conference on the impacts of civic technology.
http://bit.ly/2e5NifJ

2017 IFLA International News Media Conference
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April 27-28, 2017
Reykjavik, Iceland
This conference will examine issues and challenges in collecting and preserving the news and making it available to users. Do access and preservation have different prerequisites? In addition, the conference will explore how news media is used and transformed by researchers and the public. Can we recognize variable user needs? Do we offer the most suitable APIs?
http://bit.ly/2gjYmu2

Creative Commons Global Summit
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April 28-30, 2017
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
This event will gather a global community of technologists, academics, activists, creatives, and legal experts to work together on the expansion and growth of the commons, open knowledge, and free culture for all.
http://bit.ly/2cO3x0P

IFLA MetLib 2017
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April 30-May 5, 2017
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
The 2017 program theme is "Partnerships: Creating a new vision for libraries". Among the subthemes will be discussions of how and why to use, form, and manage partnerships, management tools, and best practices.
http://bit.ly/2ghPOPp

OpenTech
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May 13, 2017
London, UK
OpenTech 2017 is an informal, low cost, one-day conference on slightly different approaches to technology, experience and democracy. Talks by people who work on things that matter guarantee a day of thoughtful talks leading to conversations with friends.
http://bit.ly/2lmW53w

4th Africa Library Summit and 2nd AfLIA conference
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May 14-20, 2017
Yaounde, Cameroon
Moved from Ethiopia to the site of the second bidder due to safety concerns, this conference co-locates the fourth Africa Library Sumit and the second African Library and Information Associations and Institutions conference.
http://bit.ly/2hsw64E

Citizen Science Conference 2017
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May 17-20, 2017
St Paul, Minnesota
The biennial citizen science conference brings together a diverse group of researchers, practitioners, community organizations, and participants.
http://bit.ly/2jspOWl

IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy
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May 22-24, 2017
San Jose, California
The 38th annual meeting will present developments in computer security and electronic privacy, and for bringing together researchers and practitioners in the field.
http://bit.ly/2hsqUhj

Workshop on Technology and Consumer Protection
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May 22-24, 2017
San Jose, California
Co-hosted with the IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy, ConPro will explore computer science topics with an impact on consumers. This workshop has a strong security and privacy slant, with an overall focus on ways in which computer science can prevent, detect, or address the potential for technology to deceive or unfairly harm consumers.
http://bit.ly/2fJ6ShN

Privacy Law Scholars
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June 1-2
Berkeley, California
The tenth annual Privacy Law Scholars workshop will assemble a wide array of privacy law scholars and practitioners from around the world to discuss papers in progress. Scholars from many disciplines, including psychology, economics, sociology, philosophy, political science, computer science, and mathematics also participate.
http://bit.ly/2ln2Rq3

Personal Democracy Forum CEE 2017
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June 8-9, 2017
New York, NY
The theme is PDF17 is "What We Do Now". Attendees will get connected, get inspired, learn with today's new and veteran organizers alike, and discover how what we do now can make all the difference.
http://bit.ly/2oaSCT5

Next Library Festival 2017
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June 11-14, 2017
Aarhus, Denmark
Next Library 2017 will offer a "patchwork" of co-learning, co-creative, participatory, engaging, pluralistic and interactive meetings, and lots of parallel sessions, keynote speakers, wildcard sessions, demos/exhibitions, gaming, Networking Dinner Party, Get2Gether, Social un-conferences, alternative events and surprises.
http://bit.ly/2hHNt4W

CERN Workshop on Innovations in Scholarly Communication
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June 21-23, 2017
Geneva, Switzerland
The organizers of the biennial CERN Workshop on Innovations in Scholarly Communication - OAI10 - include representatives from the Open Society Foundations, SPARC, PloS, CERN, UCL, and other academic institutions..
http://bit.ly/2jzXj6X

Open Repositories 2017
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June 26-30, 2017
Brisbane, Australia
The annual Open Repositories Conference brings together users and developers of open digital repository platforms from higher education, government, galleries, libraries, archives and museums. The Conference provides an interactive forum for delegates from around the world to come together and explore the global challenges and opportunities facing libraries and the broader scholarly information landscape.
http://bit.ly/2aOCiGp

Summer courses on privacy and international copyright laws
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July 3-7, 2017
Amsterdam, Netherlands
These courses, run by the Institute for Information Law, are intensive post-graduate courses aimed to help professionals stay abreast of changing rules. The first, on privacy law and policy, focuses on recent developments in EU and US privacy law relating to the internet and online media. The second, on international copyright law, comprises nine seminars, each focused on one specific copyright issue.
http://bit.ly/2lmPgim

Citizen Lab Summer Institute
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July 12-14
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
This year's conference is organized around five research streams: Network Interference and Freedom of Expression Online, Surveillance and Counter Surveillance, Security and Privacy of Apps, Corporate Transparency and Public Accountability, and a special session on Information Controls and Armed Conflict.
http://bit.ly/2oaGQrQ

IFLA World Libraries and Information Congress
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August 19-25, 2017
Wroclaw, Poland
The theme of the 83rd annual IFLA congress will be "Achieving a healthy future together: diverse and emerging roles for health information professionals".
http://bit.ly/2gErkVa

Privacy + Security Forum
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October 4-6, 2017
Washington, DC
The conference breaks down the silos of security and privacy by bringing together leaders from both fields.
http://bit.ly/1PZhExo

Mozfest 2017
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October 27-29, 2017
London, UK
https://ti.to/Mozilla/mozfest-2017/en
The world's leading festival for the open internet movement will feature influential thinkers from around the world to build, debate, and explore the future of a healthy internet.
http://bit.ly/2oaIXvK

***

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News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week ending 12 December 2016
====================================================

The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF. Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

Our staff, advisers and major grantees tweet at http://bit.ly/13j5fjq. Current and former grantees featured in this issue: EFF, Open Rights Group, Privacy International.


NEWS
=====
For breaking news stories, visit: http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:news/

Iceland: The Pirate Party asked to form government
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The Register reports that a new proclamation has asked Iceland's The Pirate Party (TPP) leader Birgitta Jonsdottir to lead negotiations with other parties to form a government. Two parties won more votes than TPP in the last election, but both have failed to secure a working majority.
Register: http://bit.ly/2h4avTi

Italy: Court rules embedding isn't copyright infringement
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Ars Technica reports that the appeal court of Rome has overturned one of the 152 website blocks imposed a month ago and ruled that embedding - incorporating a link that displays third-party content - does not constitute a copyright infringement. The court based its ruling on that of the European Court of Justice in the recent BestWater case, where the court held that embedding is not an infringement if the material is already accessible to the general public. The battle over linking continues in Brussels, where new copyright rules are under negotiation.
Ars Technica: http://bit.ly/2gIt8ZY

Fake news leads armed man to "self-investigate" DC pizzeria
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The Washington Post reports that local police have arrested a man armed with an assault rifle who visited a pizzeria to "self-investigate" a false conspiracy theory involving Hillary Clinton that spread online during her presidential campaign. At the Guardian, Carole Cadwalladr raises the question of platform responsibility when she uses Google's search autocomplete feature to uncover a growing, parallel universe of right-wing fake news. This universe, hidden in plain sight, is increasingly penetrating the rest of the web and is being used to track, monitor, and influence anyone who comes across its content. The resulting micro-targeting is opaque enough to evade election laws about fair campaigning. The BBC profiles a small town in Macedonia where teenagers are earning quick money from writing fake news that Americans will click on.
Washington Post: http://wapo.st/2h4hbAQ
Guardian: http://bit.ly/2hsnsDj
BBC: http://bbc.in/2gjDWkV

The Gambia: President shuts down internet for election
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Access Now reports that the government of The Gambia turned off internet access and international phone calls the night before the election. The sitting president, Yahya Jammeh, was seeking his sixth term using what writer Deji Olukotun describes as "Trump rhetoric" in a country where votes are cast by using marbles. Following the unexpected election of Adama Barro, the government turned internet access and international phone calls back on.
Access Now: http://bit.ly/2gjE1VL

EU threatens social media with regulating hate speech
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Reuters reports that the European Commission has said that companies like Microsoft, Yahoo, Twitter, Google, and Google's YouTube will have to act faster to tackle hate speech or face regulation. The Commission is not satisfied with moves the companies have made under the code of conduct agreed six months ago, which requires action on reports within 24 hours. A recent report shows that today only 40% of reports are acted in within that time.
Reuters: http://reut.rs/2hdVJqW

Attacks create million-router botnet
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At Ars Technica, Dan Goodin reports that some 900,000 routers issued by Deutsche Telekom to customers were attacked during the last weekend of November, along with similar routers used by non-DT customers. Attackers exploited a flaw that left the routers open for remote management. Shortly afterwards, The Register reported similar attacks aimed at UK routers issued by TalkTalk and the Post Office. The San Francisco Chronicle reports that the local MUNI public transport system was attacked by ransomware that demanded a payment of 100 bitcoin (about $73,000). Rather than pay the ransom, MUNI officials turned off the system and allowed travellers to ride for free. The Chronicle estimates the cost at about $50,000; the attack was traced to an employee who clicked on a link in a phishing email.
Ars Technica: http://bit.ly/2hauPj9
Register: http://bit.ly/2hsh7aZ
SF Chronicle: http://bit.ly/2gjFvzw

Trump seeks internet shutdown capabilities
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CNN reports that President-elect Donald Trump has called for shutting down the internet in some areas to stop the spread of terror and explains why he'll find it difficult. At The Intercept, Sam Biddle reports that of nine technology companies asked if they would sell their services to help Trump construct the Muslim registry he has repeatedly said he favours, only one - Twitter - issued an unequivocal "no".
CNN: http://cnnmon.ie/2h4kZ59
Intercept: http://bit.ly/2h4mssa


FEATURES AND ANALYSIS
====================
For more features and analysis selected by the Program team, visit:
http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:oped/

Colombia: Where is my data?
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In this blog posting, EFF summarises "¿Dónde están mis datos?", a report recently published by leading Colombian digital rights organisation Fundacion Karisma. While Colombian telecommunications companies have not yet adopted best practices for privacy and transparency reporting, two key companies, ETB and Telefónica-Movistar, have significantly improved. The country's privacy law has not kept pace with other parts of the world, making telecommunications companies crucial players in protecting user privacy.
EFF: http://bit.ly/2hdPUtF

Elections and data-driven psychometrics
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In this lengthy article (in German) at PersonalData.io, Mikael Krogerus and Hannes Grassegger explore the connections between the election of Donald Trump and Michal Kosinski and his work on data-driven psychometrics. Kosinski's work refining his use of Facebook "Likes" to create precise personality profiles provided the underpinnings for Cambridge Analytica's approach to data-driven communications, which the company claims helped win the EU Leave campaign in Britain and elect Donald Trump. By way of comparison, in 2012 Technology Reviiew outlined the data practices that got Barack Obama elected to a second term.
PersonalData: http://bit.ly/2haD5j8
Google Translate: http://bit.ly/2hmA1UE
Technology Review: http://bit.ly/2grEHH9

The privacy risks of data in the cloud
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In this blog posting at Privacy Surgeon, Privacy International founder and former executive director Simon Davies discusses privacy protection for data held in the cloud. Davies analyses two current cases. First, Microsoft continues to fight a court order that would force it to reveal user emails held on its Irish servers. Second, the US Congress is considering legislation that would grant law enforcement access to such data "based on mutual recognition of 'human rights standards'". In the UK, Davies says, similar plans lack transparency. In a blog posting, The Engine Room, traces the explicit links between data collection and human rights abuses.
Privacy Surgon: http://bit.ly/2gjJZpL
Engine Room: http://bit.ly/2gjOeSa

The anxieties of artificial intelligence
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In this Guardian article, Intel anthropologist Genevieve Bell discusses humans, AI, and why a technology company needs an anthropologist. Humans, she says, fear being made irrelevant. The question is not whether AIs will rise up and kill us but whether we will give them the tools to do so. Meanwhile, the Internet of Things will make some things visible that are not now; Bell's example is the discovery that cows that can milk themselves prefer to do so five or six times a day rather than once or twice. Ben Evans considers the implications of combining floods of photography with AI.
Guardian: http://bit.ly/2hsnWtc
Ben Evans: http://bit.ly/2gIuoMJjt

Contracts and the Internet of Things
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In this Jotwell posting, Nancy Kim summarises a lengthy legal journal article by Stacy-Ann Elvy analysing whether (US) contract law is ready for the Internet of Things. The short answer: no. Elvy discusses issues such as consent, how Internet of Things devices should be regarded under the law, and information asymmetry. She makes recommendations for how courts should consider such issues, and urges the Uniform Law Commission and American Law Institute to change doctrinal rules to take the new commercial environment into account.
Jotwell: http://bit.ly/2haAcPv

Fifty-two surprising lessons for 2016
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In this Medium posting, Fluxx consultant Tom Whitwell lists 52 surprising things he learned in 2016. Number one is the existence of a service called Call Me Baby, which supplies human voices to scams that need them in a variety of languages.
Medium: http://bit.ly/2gIy80l


***

DIARY
==============
To see more events recommended by the Information Program team, visit:
https://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:events/. If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

Privacy Camp
----------------------------------------
January 24, 2017
Brussels, Belgium
Co-organised by EDRi, Privacy Salon, USL-B, and VUB-LSTS, the fifth annual Privacy Camp brings together civil society, policy makers, and academia to discuss existing and looming problems for human rights in the digital environment.
http://bit.ly/2evfpa9

Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection
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January 25-27, 2017
Brussels, Belgium
The tenth CPDP's main theme is artificial intelligence. The conference is accepting proposals for panels in April (from academic consortia, research projects, think tanks, and other research organisations) and May (from individuals wishing to present academic research papers).
http://bit.ly/1OrQSv6

Internet Freedom Festival
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March 6-10, 2017
Valencia, Spain
The Internet Freedom Festival gathers the community keeping the Internet open and uncensored for a week of free-form multidisciplinary collaboration intended to help groups achieve their goals. Attendance is free and open to the public.
http://bit.ly/2dI8EV1

Rightscon 2017
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March 29-31, 2017
Brussels, Belgium
RightsCon will tackle the most pressing issues at the intersection of technology and human rights. Session proposals are being accepted until November 25, 2016.
http://bit.ly/I2ZAUZ

We Robot
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March 31-April 1, 2017
New Haven, Connecticut
The sixth annual We Robot will be held at Yale Law School and will focus on the coming legal and policy conflicts as robots and AI become part of daily life.
http://bit.ly/2fVF2SI

TICTeC 2017
----------------------------------------
April 25-26, 2017
Florence, Italy
This will be the third mySociety conference on the impacts of civic technology.
http://bit.ly/2e5NifJ

2017 IFLA International News Media Conference
----------------------------------------
April 27-28, 2017
Reykjavik, Iceland
This conference will examine issues and challenges in collecting and preserving the news and making it available to users. Do access and preservation have different prerequisites? In addition, the conference will explore how news media is used and transformed by researchers and the public. Can we recognize variable user needs? Do we offer the most suitable APIs?
http://bit.ly/2gjYmu2

Creative Commons Global Summit
----------------------------------------
April 28-30, 2017
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
This event will gather a global community of technologists, academics, activists, creatives, and legal experts to work together on the expansion and growth of the commons, open knowledge, and free culture for all.
http://bit.ly/2cO3x0P

MetLib 2017
----------------------------------------
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
The 2017 programme theme is "Partnerships: Creating a new vision for libraries". Among the subthemes will be discussions of how and why to use, form, and manage partnerships, management tools, and best practices.
http://bit.ly/2ghPOPp

4th Africa Library Summit and 2nd AfLIA conference
----------------------------------------
May 14-20, 2017
Yaounde, Cameroon
Moved from Ethiopia to the site of the second bidder due to safety concerns, this conference co-locates the fourth Africa Library Sumit and the second African Library and Information Associations and Institutions conference.
http://bit.ly/2hsw64E

IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy
----------------------------------------
May 22-24, 2017
San Jose, California
The 38th annual meeting will present developments in computer security and electronic privacy, and for bringing together researchers and practitioners in the field.
http://bit.ly/2hsqUhj

Workshop on Technology and Consumer Protection
----------------------------------------
May 22-24, 2017
San Jose, California
Co-hosted with the IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy, ConPro will explore computer science topics with an impact on consumers. This workshop has a strong security and privacy slant, with an overall focus on ways in which computer science can prevent, detect, or address the potential for technology to deceive or unfairly harm consumers.
http://bit.ly/2fJ6ShN

Open Repositories 2017
----------------------------------------
June 26-30, 2017
Brisbane, Australia
The annual Open Repositories Conference brings together users and developers of open digital repository platforms from higher education, government, galleries, libraries, archives and museums. The Conference provides an interactive forum for delegates from around the world to come together and explore the global challenges and opportunities facing libraries and the broader scholarly information landscape.
http://bit.ly/2aOCiGp

IFLA World Libraries and Information Congress
----------------------------------------
August 19-25, 2017
Wroclaw, Poland
The theme of the 83rd annual IFLA congress will be "Achieving a healthy future together: diverse and emerging roles for health information professionals".
http://bit.ly/2gErkVa

***

Hear more from the Information Program!
================================
If you want to hear more from the Information Program team each week, consider subscribing to our shared bookmarks on delicious using this RSS feed:
http://feeds.pinboard.in/rss/secret:95194ab804ccccac713b/u:osi_info_program/

You can also read more about our work on the Open Society Foundations website: http://www.opensocietyfoundations.org/about/programs/information-program

Hear less from the Information Program!
================================
If you wish to unsubscribe from this weekly digest, please send an email with the subject line "Unsubscribe" to info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

This digest operates under the OSF privacy policy: http://www.opensocietyfoundations.org/about/policies/privacy

Additionally, it uses the bit.ly URL shortening service, which operates under the following privacy policy: http://bit.ly/pages/privacy/

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/

Open Society Foundation, part of the Open Society Foundations, is a company limited by guarantee registered in England and Wales (company number 4571628) and a registered charity (charity number 1105069). Its registered office address is 7th Floor, Millbank Tower, 21-24 Millbank, London SW1P 4QP



News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week ending 25 November 2016
====================================================

The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF. Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

Our staff, advisers and major grantees tweet at http://bit.ly/13j5fjq. Current and former grantees featured in this issue: EFF, Open Rights Group.


NEWS
=====
For breaking news stories, visit: http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:news/

US confirms end of Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The Guardian reports that the White House has confirmed the end of the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement as Congressional leaders have indicated they will not pass the trade deal before President Obama leaves office; president-elect Donald Trump repeatedly attacked the deal during the election campaign. EFF assesses the damage in other countries: New Zealand has now passed the implementing legislation required to ratify TPP, including an extension to copyright to author's life plus 70 years. In Japan, the ratifying bill has passed the lower house. Finally, the remaining countries, led by Mexico and Japan, may decide to conclude the agreement without the US.
Guardian: http://bit.ly/2fIVfHV
EFF: http://bit.ly/2gjLVtV

UK: Parliament passes the Investigatory Powers bill
----------------------------------------------------------------------
ZDNet reports that the Investigatory Powers bill - also knows as the "Snooper's Charter" - has passed both houses of Parliament and now merely awaits Royal Assent to become law. The law will require internet service providers to store every customer's real-time top-level web history for up to a year; force companies to decrypt data on demand; and allow intelligence agencies to hack into all computer hardware ("bulk equipment interference"). Open Rights Group executive director Jim Killock has called the bill "the most extreme surveillance law ever passed in a democracy". At its blog, ORG cites chapter five of its 2015 report to remind readers that Donald Trump's incoming US administration is likely to have access to all this data, given the close relationship between the NSA and GCHQ. However, the Guardian reports that Germany fears Britain's EU departure plans may cause it to pull out of an EU intelligence-sharing program intended to combat terrorism and promote security. Computer Weekly notes that opposing organizations include the National Union of Journalists and that the legal challenge mounted by the MPs Tom Watson and David Davis (now withdrawn) against the bill's predecessor, the Data Protection and Investigatory Powers Act, is still pending in the European Court of Justice.
ZDNet: http://zd.net/2fse15p
ORG: http://bit.ly/2fVyByW
Guardian: http://bit.ly/2g7TpAU
CW: http://bit.ly/2fIYQp9

Cameroon: Government launches campaign against social media
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Global Voices reports that the government of Cameroon has launched a campaign against social media; the government-controlled Cameroon Tribune has called social media "a threat to peace and a secret instrument of manipulation". After a recent train derailment, pictures and videos of the accident were being posted on Facebook, Twitter, and other platforms while the government was still denying the accident had taken place.
Global Voices: http://bit.ly/2fVpTRf

Russian hackers target US political NGOs and think tanks
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Security journalist Brian Krebs reports that according to a report from the DC-based cyber incident response firm Volexity, shortly after Donald Trump became the presumptive US president-elect, the Russian "The Dukes" hacker gang launched a series of targeted phishing campaigns against American political think tanks and NGOs. The Dukes is best known for hacking into computer networks at the US Democratic National Committee. Volexity provides the details of the five waves of attacks so far but notes they are ongoing; the firm believes the hackers are working to gain long-term access to the networks of the groups they're targeting.
Krebs: http://bit.ly/2gEbLgj
Volexity: http://bit.ly/2fVBBLC

Facebook gears up to fight fake news
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The Guardian reports that a week after denying that fake news could influence voters - and a few days after the German Justice Minister indicates that he believes Facebook should be regulated like a media company - Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced initiatives to tackle the dissemination of misinformation on his company's platform. A Buzzfeed analysis found that fake election news stories outperformed real news on Facebook. Buzzfeed also reports that teens in the Balkans are duping Trump supporters with fake news. At Medium, ethnographer Christine Xu compares the state of fake news and propaganda in the US and China, where the media are so distrusted that misinformation is easily spread via family and friends. Monday Note editor Frederic Filloux analyses the way the mainstream media's changed business model helped drive Donald Trump to the presidency. The New York Times reports that meanwhile Facebook has been developing software to enable a third party to suppress posts in individuals' news feeds in specific geographic areas; the initiative is believed to be intended to give the company access to the Chinese market. The Verge reports that Facebook has acquired Crowdtangle, a software company whose products were being used by journalists to track the spread of fake news, and also that a list of "fake news sites" compiled by Massachusetts journalism professor Melissa Zimdar, rapidly publicized by major news organizations, included many satire and parody websites, as well as Private Eye's own site and, reports IB Times, Breitbart.
Guardian: http://bit.ly/2fsmxkO
Reuters: http://reut.rs/2gpWOLM
Buzzfeed (outperformance): http://bzfd.it/2fbrBi4
Buzzfeed (Macedonia): http://bzfd.it/2gjUPaI
Monday Note: http://bit.ly/2fJcyIH
NY Times: http://nyti.ms/2fsp5zb
Verge: http://bit.ly/2gjRrwv
IBTimes: http://bit.ly/2fVCaoV

Regulating smart cars
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting at the Center for Democracy and Technology, Joseph Jerome discusses how smart cars should be regulated. The US National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is charged with regulating motor vehicle safety, but privacy and cyber security lie outside its realm of experience and expertise, and it has sent mixed signals about whether it reviews these as safety issues. Also potentially involved are the Federal Trade Commission, whose consumer protection mandate includes privacy, and the Federal Communications Commission, which has the power to regulate technologies, such as broadband, that it designates as telecommunications services. Jerome hopes the three will collaborate effectively.
CDT: http://bit.ly/2gpSXi9

FEATURES AND ANALYSIS
====================
For more features and analysis selected by the Program team, visit:
http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:oped/

Code programmers are ashamed of writing
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this Medium, Bill Sourour discusses code he remains ashamed of having written and urges other programmers to think about the effects of their code before they write it. The post has set off myriad confessions from programmers about the unethical and illegal things they've been asked to do, which Business Insider summarizes. Many argue that ethics should be included in computer science and programming courses. Sourour was originally inspired to write his post by the video of Bob Martin's talk "The Future of Programming".
Medium: http://bit.ly/2gpW89a
BusinessInsider: http://read.bi/2fbqKOp
YouTube (Martin): http://bit.ly/2fVHI2L

Internet freedom under pressure
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this report, Freedom House studies the state of app and social media crackdowns worldwide. In the interests of blocking access, 15 governments worldwide have shut down the entire internet or mobile network. Among the key findings for 2016: for the sixth consecutive year internet freedom has declined; 67% of internet users live in countries which censor criticism of the government, military, or ruling family; 38 countries (27%) have made arrests based on social media postings; secure, speedy apps like WhatsApp are increasingly the target of government action. The worst-scoring countries for internet freedom are China, Iran, Syria, and Ethiopia. Online Censorship's report covering April to November 2016 finds increasing numbers of complaints about politically-motivated censorship, much of it pertaining to the US election.
Freedom House: http://bit.ly/2fvarKW
Online Censorship (PDF): http://bit.ly/2fVDSXl

Liberia: Lessons from the attack that may not have happened
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting, Access Now discusses the recent reports that the entire country of Liberia was taken offline by a botnet attack. Security researchers, officials, and Access Now's local partners all have reported no effective decline in connectivity. However, given that connectivity to Liberia and many other countries on the West coast of Africa is primarily supplied by a single submarine cable, Access Now argues that much greater attention needs to be paid to resilience and that we need to make it harder to shut down the internet. Steve Song discusses the costs of data connections in Africa, noting that it costs more to get data from Africa's interior countries to the coast than it does the rest of the way to Europe.
Access Now: http://bit.ly/2fVDtUx
Song: http://bit.ly/2gl4iCt

Ethics all the way down
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this TED talk video, Zeynep Tufecki argues that machine intelligence can fail in ways that humans won't predict and that therefore we can't outsource our decisions to machines: "It's ethics all the way down." In a podcast discussion at O'Reilly Radar, data scientist Hilary Mason makes similar points while discussing current research projects at her company Fast Forward Labs and the barriers to adopting AI.
TED: http://bit.ly/2fvaZjP
O'Reilly: http://oreil.ly/2fbBlJc

Children's rights and data protection
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting at the LSE Media Policy Project, Ghent professor Eva Lievens discusses the impact of the new General Data Protection Regulation on children's rights. Among her concerns are the provisions requiring parental consent for children under 16; treating children over that age as adults with respect to data processing; and the omission of age-related concerns from the many other articles in the regulation. Ghent will begin a four-year research project to evaluate this law critically and monitor its implementation on children, and Lievens urges other researchers to help provide an in-depth, evidence-based understanding of how children's right to privacy and data protection should be protected.
LSE: http://bit.ly/2gEhGSt


***

DIARY
==============
To see more events recommended by the Information Program team, visit:
https://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:events/. If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

Digital Democracy workshop
November 27, 2016
London, England
The Digital Democracy afternoon workshop, a collaboration of Cybersalon and the Digital Liberties Register, will explore digital deliberation and how to design online participatory processes that work for and empower everyone.
http://bit.ly/2gl7z4w

Latin America in a Glimpse
----------------------------------------
December 5, 2016
Guadalajara, Mexico
Derechos Digitales, IFEX-ALC, and Coding Rights (Brazil) will present a summary of the most important trends of the past year in digital rights in Latin America. The roundtable discussions are intended to help the international community to connect and better understand the reality of human rights on the internet in Latin America. Main topics will be digital surveillance and the right to be forgotten.
http://bit.ly/2g83opK

Internet Governance Forum
----------------------------------------
December 6-9, 2016 (TBC)
Guadalajara, Mexico
With the UN's renewal in December 2015, the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) consolidates itself as a platform to bring people together from various stakeholder groups as equals, in discussions on public policy issues relating to the Internet. While there is no negotiated outcome, the IGF informs and inspires those with policy-making power in both the public and private sectors. At their annual meeting delegates discuss, exchange information and share good practices with each other.
http://bit.ly/28YwZPX

Open Government Partnership Summit
----------------------------------------
December 7-9, 2016
Paris, France
Representatives from governments, academia, civil society and international organizations will gather to share their experiences and best practices and push forward the open government global agenda in light of the great challenges of the modern world. As a forum for sharing best practices, OGP provides a unique platform that brings together, stimulates and expands the community of state reformers worldwide.
http://bit.ly/2b1IY0Q

Privacy Camp
----------------------------------------
January 24, 2017
Brussels, Belgium
Co-organised by EDRi, Privacy Salon, USL-B, and VUB-LSTS, the fifth annual Privacy Camp brings together civil society, policy makers, and academia to discuss existing and looming problems for human rights in the digital environment.
http://bit.ly/2evfpa9

Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection
----------------------------------------
January 25-27, 2017
Brussels, Belgium
The tenth CPDP's main theme is artificial intelligence. The conference is accepting proposals for panels in April (from academic consortia, research projects, think tanks, and other research organisations) and May (from individuals wishing to present academic research papers).
http://bit.ly/1OrQSv6

Internet Freedom Festival
----------------------------------------
March 6-10, 2017
Valencia, Spain
The Internet Freedom Festival gathers the community keeping the Internet open and uncensored for a week of free-form multidisciplinary collaboration intended to help groups achieve their goals. Attendance is free and open to the public.
http://bit.ly/2dI8EV1

Rightscon 2017
----------------------------------------
March 29-31, 2017
Brussels, Belgium
RightsCon will tackle the most pressing issues at the intersection of technology and human rights. Session proposals are being accepted until November 25, 2016.
http://bit.ly/I2ZAUZ

We Robot
----------------------------------------
March 31-April 1, 2017
New Haven, Connecticut
The sixth annual We Robot will be held at Yale Law School and will focus on the coming legal and policy conflicts as robots and AI become part of daily life.
http://bit.ly/2fVF2SI

TICTeC 2017
----------------------------------------
April 25-26, 2017
Florence, Italy
This will be the third mySociety conference on the impacts of civic technology.
http://bit.ly/2e5NifJ

Creative Commons Global Summit
----------------------------------------
April 28-30, 2017
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
This event will gather a global community of technologists, academics, activists, creatives, and legal experts to work together on the expansion and growth of the commons, open knowledge, and free culture for all.
http://bit.ly/2cO3x0P

IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy
----------------------------------------
May 22-24, 2017
San Jose, California
The 38th annual meeting will present developments in computer security and electronic privacy, and for bringing together researchers and practitioners in the field.
http://www.ieee-security.org/TC/SP2017/index.html

Workshop on Technology and Consumer Protection
----------------------------------------
May 22-24, 2017
San Jose, California
Co-hosted with the IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy, ConPro will explore computer science topics with an impact on consumers. This workshop has a strong security and privacy slant, with an overall focus on ways in which computer science can prevent, detect, or address the potential for technology to deceive or unfairly harm consumers.
http://bit.ly/2fJ6ShN

Open Repositories 2017
----------------------------------------
June 26-30, 2017
Brisbane, Australia
The annual Open Repositories Conference brings together users and developers of open digital repository platforms from higher education, government, galleries, libraries, archives and museums. The Conference provides an interactive forum for delegates from around the world to come together and explore the global challenges and opportunities facing libraries and the broader scholarly information landscape.
http://bit.ly/2aOCiGp

IFLA World Libraries and Information Congress
----------------------------------------
August 19-25, 2017
Wroclaw, Poland
The theme of the 83rd annual IFLA congress will be "Achieving a healthy future together: diverse and emerging roles for health information professionals".
http://bit.ly/2gErkVa

***

Hear more from the Information Program!
================================
If you want to hear more from the Information Program team each week, consider subscribing to our shared bookmarks on delicious using this RSS feed:
http://feeds.pinboard.in/rss/secret:95194ab804ccccac713b/u:osi_info_program/

You can also read more about our work on the Open Society Foundations website: http://www.opensocietyfoundations.org/about/programs/information-program

Hear less from the Information Program!
================================
If you wish to unsubscribe from this weekly digest, please send an email with the subject line "Unsubscribe" to info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

This digest operates under the OSF privacy policy: http://www.opensocietyfoundations.org/about/policies/privacy

Additionally, it uses the bit.ly URL shortening service, which operates under the following privacy policy: http://bit.ly/pages/privacy/

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/

Open Society Foundation, part of the Open Society Foundations, is a company limited by guarantee registered in England and Wales (company number 4571628) and a registered charity (charity number 1105069). Its registered office address is 7th Floor, Millbank Tower, 21-24 Millbank, London SW1P 4QP



News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week ending 11 November 2016
====================================================

The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF. Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

Our staff, advisers and major grantees tweet at http://bit.ly/13j5fjq. Current and former grantees featured in this issue: EFF, Privacy International.


NEWS
=====
For breaking news stories, visit: http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:news/

US elects Donald Trump as 45th president
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In the wake of Donald Trump's election as US president, the Guardian reports that Facebook is being accused of spreading misinformation and "fake news". Two weeks ago, the New York Times critiqued the methods used by the USC/LA Times poll to explain why two unusual weightings made it the only outlier that consistently predicted Trump's victory. CS Monitor summarises what's known about the president-elect's likely cyber security policies. EFF blogs that Trump's victory ends all chance of passing the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement, but warns that other countries are still passing the necessary supporting legislation, and therefore the impact of the copyright provisions will remain. At The Intercept, Glenn Greenwald writes angrily about the failure of Western institutions and elites to take seriously the suffering of those left out of their comfort zone.
Guardian: http://bit.ly/2fH8XhL
NY Times: http://nyti.ms/2eJdb3V
CS Monitor: http://bit.ly/2fHFHUb
EFF: http://bit.ly/2fHIP40
Intercept: http://bit.ly/2eYyxuZ

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg under investigation in Germany
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Reuters reports that Munich prosecutors are investigating Mark Zuckerberg and other Facebook executives over a complaint that Facebook has failed to remove 438 hate speech and seditious postings that are contrary to German law. Similar charges have already been dismissed by the Hamburg court, but Bavaria may take a different view.
Reuters: http://reut.rs/2fCMkbG

UAE surveillance contractor recruits hackers
----------------------------------------------------------------------
BoingBoing reports that the UAE-based company DarkMatter, which describes itself as a major state security contractor, has been bombarding sophisticated security experts with recruitment emails. Near-hires say the job is weaponising zero-day vulnerabilities so the UAE can carry out fine-grained surveillance against its citizens. DarkMatter, which has poached staff from companies like Google, Qualcomm, McAfee, and encrypted messaging service Wickr, denies the claims. BoingBoing notes that DarkMatter is believed to have hired the team that carried out the Stealth Falcon attack on journalists.
BoingBoing: http://bit.ly/2fWBZLt

UK Investigatory Powers Tribunal challenged in European Court of Justice
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Human Rights Watch reports that it and six individuals have taken a challenge to the European Court of Justice to demand that the UK Investigatory Powers Tribunal confirm whether or not the individuals were subject to surveillance by GCHQ, as well as whether the surveillance was lawful. The case is based on claims filed with the tribunal in 2015; in that case, the tribunal dismissed the claims of individuals not resident in the UK and issued a "no determination" ruling for the rest. Meanwhile, The Register reports that the Investigatory Powers Bill has completed its passage through Parliament but Royal Assent is being delayed for a week. At issue is an amendment that would force press to join the government-approved regulator created after the phone hacking scandals.
HRW: http://bit.ly/2fH9Fvb
Register: http://bit.ly/2fH3DLk

Iceland: Pirate Party wins ten parliamentary seats
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The New York Times reports that Iceland's Pirate Party came in second in the country's October 30 general election, giving it ten parliamentary seats out of 63. The Register adds that the Pirate Party has, however, rejected the offer of a seat in the coalition government the conservative Independent Party will now form, saying it is "looking to make a change, not to gain power".
NY Times: http://nyti.ms/2eYCS16
Register: http://bit.ly/2fq2lRD

CJEU rules that IP addresses can be personal data
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Ars Technica reports that the European Court of Justice has ruled that dynamic IP addresses - that is, Internet Protocol addresses assigned temporarily, for example by a mobile network operator - can be personal data. German Pirate Party politician Patrick Breyer had brought an action asking the courts to issue an injunction preventing websites from collecting and storing his dynamic IP address so that German authorities could not build up a picture of his interests. CJEU ruled that such IP addresses could be personal data if the website in question had additional information that allowed it to identify individuals. In its blog, the Bird & Bird legal firm discusses the judgment in detail, and says the ruling may have substantial impact on analytics and other standard industry practices.
Ars Technica: http://bit.ly/2ePdwFv


FEATURES AND ANALYSIS
====================
For more features and analysis selected by the Program team, visit:
http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:oped/

Brazil: The battle for encryption
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this posting, Privacy International discusses the situation regarding encryption in Brazil, where WhatsApp has been asked to disable its encryption to aid criminal investigations even though no law limits the use of encryption. The core of the investigations is being kept secret; however, draft bills legalising blocking applications such as frequent target WhatsApp are under debate in the National Congress.
PI: http://bit.ly/2g2p226

The internet is loosening our grip on the truth
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this New York Times article, Farhad Manjoo argues that the internet is loosening our grip on the truth, using the just-concluded "fact-free" US presidential election as Exhibit A. Manjoo weighs studies of the internet's echo chamber effect, and finds that even documentary proof is losing its power to persuade, while lies have become institutionalised despite the rise of a mass of fact-checking sites. Manjoo does not consider the wider influence of partisan mass media.
NY Times: http://nyti.ms/2fpX5xv

Principles for countering violent extremism online
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting, Access Now introduces a policy guide for proposals to prevent or counter violent extremism online. Such proposals are "a minefield for human rights", and risk blocking satire, political protest, journalism, and community activism; they also risk undermining existing law protecting freedom of expression and privacy. The guide offers principles and recommendations.
Access Now: http://bit.ly/2eJbIun

The future of open education
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting at the E-Learn blog, Willem van Valkenburg discusses the future of open education, comparing and contrasting US and European strategies. The US has converged on Open Textbooks, while Europe has diverged in the direction of open science, which van Valkenburg describes as a much broader process of opening up universities. He suggests that the US strategy will have the bigger short-term impact but that over the longer term Open Science will have a much broader impact on society.
E-Learn: http://bit.ly/2fWzOHX

How open data won the Leave campaign
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this BBC news report, Laura Kuenssberg looks back at Britain's Leave campaign and discovers that Vote Leave hired physicists, data experts, and digital specialists to build its own tools in order to mine publicly available data in new and sophisticated ways. The resulting Voter Information Collection System was able to pinpoint exactly which doors to knock on, tightly focussing the online Leave campaign and "win the data war" that most in Westminster had no idea was underway.
BBC: http://bbc.in/2fH3OpY

How the web became unreadable
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this posting at Medium, MicroFormats co-founder Kevin Marks analyses the rise across the web of skinny, grey, low-contrast type that is unreadable to most people. Marks explains contrast ratios and traces the fad to the Typography Handbook and other design advice which promote the view that too much contrast induces eyestrain. In a new large-scale usability study, Nielsen-Norman Group finds that the usability errors they first identified in 1996 continue in 2016 to frustrate users.
Medium: http://bit.ly/2eJdVpo
NNGroup: http://bit.ly/2fWCsgM


***

DIARY
==============
To see more events recommended by the Information Program team, visit:
https://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:events/. If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

OpenCon
----------------------------------------
November 12-14, 2016
Washington, DC
At this event, the next generation can learn about Open Access, Open Education, and Open Data, develop critical skills, and catalyse action toward a more open system of research and education. OpenCon will convene students and early career academic professionals, both in person and through satellite events around the world and serve as a powerful catalyst for projects led by the next generation to advance OpenCon's three focus areas.
http://bit.ly/1OocSMD

WIPO Standing Committee on Copyright and Related Rights
----------------------------------------
November 14-16, 2016
Geneva, Switzerland
Topics at the 33rd meeting of SCCR will include the protection of broadcasting organisations, exceptions and limitations for libraries and archives, limitations and exceptions for educational and research institutions and for persons with disabilities, and proposals for analysing copyright with respect to the digital environment and to include the resale right in future work.
http://bit.ly/2bi2lF9

Data Transparency Lab
----------------------------------------
November 16-19, 2016
New York, NY
This conference incorporates three colocated events. DTL will explore topics such as transparency, the ad blocking arms race, and privacy metrics. Fairness and Accountability in Machine Learning will bring together a growing community of researchers and practitioners. Finally, The Workshop on Data and Algorithmic Transparency will convene an emerging interdisciplinary community that seeks transparency and oversight of data-driven algorithmic systems through empirical research.
http://bit.ly/2eGJMb2

Internet Governance Forum
----------------------------------------
December 6-9, 2016 (TBC)
Guadalajara, Mexico
With the UN's renewal in December 2015, the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) consolidates itself as a platform to bring people together from various stakeholder groups as equals, in discussions on public policy issues relating to the Internet. While there is no negotiated outcome, the IGF informs and inspires those with policy-making power in both the public and private sectors. At their annual meeting delegates discuss, exchange information and share good practices with each other.
http://bit.ly/28YwZPX

Open Government Partnership Summit
----------------------------------------
December 7-9, 2016
Paris, France
Representatives from governments, academia, civil society and international organizations will gather to share their experiences and best practices and push forward the open government global agenda in light of the great challenges of the modern world. As a forum for sharing best practices, OGP provides a unique platform that brings together, stimulates and expands the community of state reformers worldwide.
http://bit.ly/2b1IY0Q

Privacy Camp
----------------------------------------
January 24, 2017
Brussels, Belgium
Co-organised by EDRi, Privacy Salon, USL-B, and VUB-LSTS, the fifth annual Privacy Camp brings together civil society, policy makers, and academia to discuss existing and looming problems for human rights in the digital environment.
http://bit.ly/2evfpa9

Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection
----------------------------------------
January 25-27, 2017
Brussels, Belgium
The tenth CPDP's main theme is artificial intelligence. The conference is accepting proposals for panels in April (from academic consortia, research projects, think tanks, and other research organisations) and May (from individuals wishing to present academic research papers).
http://bit.ly/1OrQSv6

Internet Freedom Festival
----------------------------------------
March 6-10, 2017
Valencia, Spain
The Internet Freedom Festival gathers the community keeping the Internet open and uncensored for a week of free-form multidisciplinary collaboration intended to help groups achieve their goals. Attendance is free and open to the public.
http://bit.ly/2dI8EV1

Rightscon 2017
----------------------------------------
March 29-31, 2017
Brussels, Belgium
RightsCon will tackle the most pressing issues at the intersection of technology and human rights. Session proposals are being accepted until November 25, 2016.
http://bit.ly/I2ZAUZ

TICTeC 2017
----------------------------------------
April 25-26, 2017
Florence, Italy
This will be the third mySociety conference on the impacts of civic technology.
http://bit.ly/2e5NifJ

Creative Commons Global Summit
----------------------------------------
April 28-30, 2017
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
This event will gather a global community of technologists, academics, activists, creatives, and legal experts to work together on the expansion and growth of the commons, open knowledge, and free culture for all.
http://bit.ly/2cO3x0P

Open Repositories 2017
----------------------------------------
June 26-30, 2017
Brisbane, Australia
The annual Open Repositories Conference brings together users and developers of open digital repository platforms from higher education, government, galleries, libraries, archives and museums. The Conference provides an interactive forum for delegates from around the world to come together and explore the global challenges and opportunities facing libraries and the broader scholarly information landscape.
http://bit.ly/2aOCiGp


***

Hear more from the Information Program!
================================
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News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week ending 14 October 2016
====================================================

The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF. Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

Our staff, advisers and major grantees tweet at http://bit.ly/13j5fjq. Current and former grantees featured in this issue: EDRi, EFF, Open Knowledge Foundation.

PROGRAM NEWS
==============
This posting describes how 23 NGOs, including OSF grantees AK Vorrat, EDRi, La Quadrature du Net, Bits of Freedom, and Digitale Gesellschaft, achieved the win for network neutrality in Europe.
https://osf.to/2dymljW


NEWS
=====
For breaking news stories, visit: http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:news/

EU publishes copyright directive
----------------------------------------------------------------------
EDRi reports that the EU's proposals for copyright reform, published September 14, "could not conceivably be worse", highlighting that the directive threatens to bring in filtering for all internet uploads, create legal uncertainty for European hosting companies, and create a new 20-year "ancillary copyright" giving publishers the right to control links to their material. The Internet Archive calls it an "absolute disaster", noting that the proposal also fails to protect freedom of panorama. Wikimedia writes that the proposals fail to consider the needs and rights of users. Intellectual Property Watch provides a thorough analysis of the proposals.
EU Parliament: http://bit.ly/2ebnl24
Internet Archive: http://bit.ly/2e5HOll
Wikimedia: http://bit.ly/2dHPKKh
IP Watch: http://bit.ly/2e5JlYJ

Internet governing body transitions to independence
----------------------------------------------------------------------
At The Register, Kieren McCarthy reports that despite a last-minute lawsuit led by US Senator Ted Cruz asking a Texas judge to issue a temporary restraining order, the US government allowed its contract with the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority, which oversees global allocation of technical internet functions to expire at 12:01 AM Washington DC time on October 1. Stewardship has transferred to the private non-profit Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, which was set up in 1998 to manage the domain name system. ICANN will decide the internet's future development. McCarthy reviews the last 15 years of ICANN's efforts to achieve independence. Organisations such as the Internet Society published congratulations.
Register: http://bit.ly/2dTSEgu
NTIA: http://bit.ly/2dsLQmJ
Internet Society: http://bit.ly/2e2nqW4

Bangladesh issues "smart" national identity cards
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Global Voices reports that the Bangladeshi government has begun issuing Smart National ID cards as part of the Digital Bangladesh Initiative which should see the cards distributed to 100 million people. The biometric cards, which will be associated with individuals' mobile SIM cards, will include 32 types of citizen data and offer access to 23 services, including voting, banking, tax payments, share-trading, and applications for passport, driving licences, and trade licences. The government says the goal is to reduce forgery, which was common with the laminated cards previously used for voting, but Global Voices suggests the new system will create new technical glitches and security risks. Citizens' reactions have been mostly positive.
Global Voices: http://bit.ly/2dhdG7C

First Internet of Things botnet attack detected
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The investigative security journalist Brian Krebs reported at the end of September that his website had been forced offline by a botnet attack of such unprecedented size that his hosting provider, Akamai, asked him to find a new provider. On October 1, Krebs reported that the source code for the Miral malware that powered the attack has been publicly released on Hackforums, opening the way for myriad copycat attacks by new botnets powered by insecure routers, IP cameras, digital video recorders, and other insecure, easily hackable devices. In a further posting, Krebs discusses which devices are being targeted by Miral, which he says are easily identified by examining the list of user names and passwords included in the source code. Finally, Krebs notes that the European Commission is drafting new cybersecurity requirements to improve security around Internet of Things devices. Bruce Schneier argues that government intervention in this area is essential because it is a market failure neither manufacturers nor consumers can fix.
Krebs (attack): http://bit.ly/2dhdOUL
Krebs (source code): http://bit.ly/2ebnSB3
Krebs (devices): http://bit.ly/2dY8Fzc
Krebs (Europe): http://bit.ly/2e2pNs6
Schneier: http://bit.ly/2dHQdff

Switzerland passes broad surveillance law
----------------------------------------------------------------------
At Ars Technica, Glyn Moody reports that in a referendum Swiss citizens have backed, by 65.5% to 34.5%, a new law that will allow the Swiss intelligence agency to break into computers, install malware, spy on phone and internet communications, and install microphones and video cameras in private locations. The Swiss government expects the new powers, intended to be used against terrorism, espionage, the dissemination of weapons of mass destruction, and attacks on important national infrastructure, to be invoked only about ten times a year. Previously, the Guardian reports, the Swiss had relied on other countries' intelligence agencies, as they were banned from tapping phones and surveilling email. Using the new powers will require approval from a federal court, the defence ministry, and the cabinet.
Ars Technica: http://bit.ly/2dFSk4D
Guardian: http://bit.ly/2e2TSSU

Yahoo! accused of secretly scanning private email to aid FBI
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Reuters reports that Yahoo, already under fire for a recently-announced 2014 data breach that exposed the personal information of an estimated 500 million users, complied with a secret directive issued by the FBI to scan the private email of its users. EPIC links the system described in the report to the similar FBI program "Carnivore", while EFF discusses the legal and technical questions the report raises and reiterates its call, filed as a lawsuit against the Department of Justice in April 2016, on the Department of Justice to publicly release all decisions of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, including that pertaining to Yahoo. Anonymous former Yahoo employees have told Motherboard that when security staff discovered the scanning system and raised the alarm, they thought it was a "buggy rootkit"; they were told to leave it alone. In a follow-up report Reuters adds detail on the legal basis for the government's request and notes that Yahoo, which is being acquired by Verizon, has called the story "misleading" and said that "the mail scanning described in the article does not exist on our systems." Separately, the New York Times discusses recent legal challenges by Microsoft and the ACLU on behalf of Open Whisper Systems to the increasing US government use of gag orders covering requests for user information.
Reuters: http://reut.rs/2emY5oO
EPIC: http://bit.ly/2dRxTjD
EFF: http://bit.ly/2en0ik1
Motherboard: http://bit.ly/2eboHdl
Reuters (legal): http://reut.rs/2dsO45g
NY Times: http://nyti.ms/2dMNx0z

Ethiopia: Government blocks internet access
----------------------------------------------------------------------
At Africa News, Abdur Rahman Alfa Shaban reports that following nationwide protests, on October 7 the Ethiopian government cut both mobile and fixed-line access to the internet, partially restoring fixed-line access later in the day. Cyber Ethiopia summarises a Brookings report that finds that similar cuts to internet access cost the country US$9 million in 2015. The same report estimates the global cost of internet shutdowns at US$2.4 billion.
Africa News: http://bit.ly/2dHUMGr
Cyber Ethiopia: http://bit.ly/2dsSNnG


FEATURES AND ANALYSIS
====================
For more features and analysis selected by the Program team, visit:
http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:oped/

Driving copyright out of education
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting for the Open Knowledge Foundation's Open Education Working Group, Communia's Lisette Kalshoven examines the problems copyright poses for education. The 2001 EU copyright directive included an optional exception for education which many member states have not implemented; Finland, for example, has no provision for derivative works in education, which bars teachers from translating foreign-language news articles. The EU's proposed reform directive creates a mandatory exception but limits its application, leaving it unclear how the old and new exceptions will interact and leaving many uses not covered. Communia is launching a project to advocate for effective change. At Education in Crisis, Alek Tarkowski argues that we need to drive copyright out of the classroom by creating an exception that covers all educational uses, including home schoolers, libraries, and museums, which often must pay licence fees.
OKFN: http://bit.ly/2dRzg1K
Education in Crisis: http://bit.ly/2dTV0vX

The Gikii approach to future challenges
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this series of presentations, participants in the 2016 Gikii conference draw on pop culture to discuss emerging technology, policy conundrums, and legal conflicts. Especially notable are Paul Bernal's slides showing the difficulty of deciding who is an online troll, Andres Guadamuz's proposals for regulating augmented reality such as the game Pokemon Go, Alison Harcourt's outline of the migration of copyright regulation from legislation to industry standards fora, and Philip Howard's proposals for regulating a civic Internet of Things, which include reporting the ultimate beneficiary of collected data.
Gikii: http://bit.ly/2dYaD2L

Lessons from ten years of open data
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting at the Sunlight Foundation, Alex Howard offers ten take-aways from the 2016 International Open Data conference. While diversity is improving, Howard regrets the loss of focus on government transparency and accountability and the general absence from the conference of politicians and journalists, while suggesting that governments need to be more aggressive about opening data sets where it's already clear there is public demand.
Sunlight: http://bit.ly/2d9mbhG

How to steal an election
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article at Bloomberg Business Week, Michael Riley, Jordan Robertson, and David Kocieniewski investigate the state of US voting machines, purchased after the 2000 Bush-Gore election under the Help America Vote Act. The market for these machines, many of which depend on buggy, insecure, antiquated technology, is dominated by just a few manufacturers, which impose unexpected ongoing costs that the original federal funding to buy the machines does not cover. The Bloomberg story focuses in particular on a recent election in Memphis, Tennessee, where approximately 40% of votes in a crucial district went missing. In a separate story, Elizabeth Dexheimer reports that 21 states have contacted the US Department of Homeland Security requesting help after reports surfaced that state systems are being scanned by malicious cyber actors. Bob Sullivan asks long-time voting machine researcher Harri Hursti to comment on claims that Russia is behind attacks on US voting systems.
Bloomberg: http://bloom.bg/2dI81dU
Bloomberg (Dexheimer): http://bloom.bg/2dYdto2
Sullivan: http://bit.ly/2dFSbOn

Living safely with automation
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this essay at the Guardian, Tim Harford suggests that reliance on automation is setting us up for disaster as, like airline pilots, we become more used to manipulating computer systems than directly running the systems they control. Harford applies lessons drawn from aviation, where this "mode confusion" causes plane crashes such as Air France flight 447, to council decisions and self-driving cars. Harford concludes by examining the work of Dutch traffic engineer Hans Monderman, who solved such conundrums by removing cues such as street signs and forcing drivers, pedestrians, and cyclists to engage with each other in navigating messy terrain, an approach that sounds risky but that in practice proved to be safer for all concerned.
Guardian: http://bit.ly/2dRA8n8

Data ethics for philanthropists
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this Upturn report, David Robinson and Miranda Bogen discuss the risks and opportunities for philanthropists seeking to invest in projects involving data at scale. Among the risks the authors list a lack of shared standards for human subject review, a lack of mathematical literacy within foundations, and the concentration of data and analytics in the private sector. The authors recommend eight questions foundations should answer in assessing such projects, and provide guidelines for managing them.
Upturn: http://bit.ly/2dhgSQT

***

DIARY
==============
To see more events recommended by the Information Program team, visit:
https://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:events/. If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

Transparency Camp 2016
----------------------------------------
October 14-15, 2016
Cleveland, OH
The Sunlight Foundation chose Cleveland for this year's unconference in order to tap into the local expertise of an area with strong grassroots organisers and clear problems the community is trying to solve. The event aims to bring together librarians, government officials, technologists, civic leaders, community organisers, and others to figure out strategies and solutions for making local and state governance better, faster, smarter and more transparent.
http://bit.ly/2aP6RaV

Freedom not Fear
----------------------------------------
October 14-17, 2016
Brussels, Belgium
At Freedom not Fear, civil society members meet to plan for and engage in action against increasing surveillance and other attacks on civil rights. The meeting, intended for civil rights and freedom activists from across Europe, is organised by volutneers and coordinated by EDRi member Digitalcourage and via the akv-international mailing list.
http://bit.ly/2cmKWrM

Privacy+Security Forum
----------------------------------------
October 24-26, 2016
Washington, DC
Monday, October 24, is devoted to pre-conference workshops and "intensive days" - advanced discussion focused narrowly on a particular topic or industry. Proposals are welcome until April 30, 2016 based on the following guiding principles: bridge the silos between privacy and security; cover issues with depth and rigour; employ interaction, scenario-based learning, and extensive engagement; deliver practical takeaways from each session.
http://bit.ly/1RIzYhV

ODI Summit
----------------------------------------
November 1, 2016
London, UK
The annual Open Data Institute Summit will feature inspiring stories from around the world on how people are innovating with the web of data, and presentations from diverse innovators, from current startup founders to experienced, high-profile speakers such as World Wide Web inventor Tim Berners-Lee, AI expert Nigel Shadbolt and Lastminute.com founder Martha Lane Fox.
http://bit.ly/2ar2aXf

ICANN 57
----------------------------------------
November 3-9, 2016
Hyderabad, India
ICANN meetings provide a venue for progressing policy work, conducting outreach, exchanging best practices, conducting business deals, interacting among members of the ICANN Community, including board and staff, and learning about ICANN.
http://bit.ly/29CmNg9

Mozilla Festival
----------------------------------------
November 6-8, 2016
London, UK
MozFest is an annual celebration of the open Web. Participants are diverse, including engineers, artists, activists, and educators, but share the common belief that the Web can make lives better, unlocks opportunity, spurs creativity, teaches valuable skills, and connects far-flung people and ideas. The Festival seeks to improve the Web with new ideas and creations.
http://bit.ly/1WmxRQ0

OpenCon
----------------------------------------
November 12-14, 2016
Washington, DC
At this event, the next generation can learn about Open Access, Open Education, and Open Data, develop critical skills, and catalyse action toward a more open system of research and education. OpenCon will convene students and early career academic professionals, both in person and through satellite events around the world and serve as a powerful catalyst for projects led by the next generation to advance OpenCon's three focus areas.
http://bit.ly/1OocSMD

WIPO Standing Committee on Copyright and Related Rights
----------------------------------------
November 14-16, 2016
Geneva, Switzerland
Topics at the 33rd meeting of SCCR will include the protection of broadcasting organisations, exceptions and limitations for libraries and archives, limitations and exceptions for educational and research institutions and for persons with disabilities, and proposals for analysing copyright with respect to the digital environment and to include the resale right in future work.
http://bit.ly/2bi2lF9

Internet Governance Forum
----------------------------------------
December 6-9, 2016 (TBC)
Guadalajara, Mexico
With the UN's renewal in December 2015, the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) consolidates itself as a platform to bring people together from various stakeholder groups as equals, in discussions on public policy issues relating to the Internet. While there is no negotiated outcome, the IGF informs and inspires those with policy-making power in both the public and private sectors. At their annual meeting delegates discuss, exchange information and share good practices with each other.
http://bit.ly/28YwZPX

Open Government Partnership Summit
----------------------------------------
December 7-9, 2016
Paris, France
Representatives from governments, academia, civil society and international organizations will gather to share their experiences and best practices and push forward the open government global agenda in light of the great challenges of the modern world. As a forum for sharing best practices, OGP provides a unique platform that brings together, stimulates and expands the community of state reformers worldwide.
http://bit.ly/2b1IY0Q

Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection
----------------------------------------
January 25-27, 2017
Brussels, Belgium
The tenth CPDP's main theme is artificial intelligence. The conference is accepting proposals for panels in April (from academic consortia, research projects, think tanks, and other research organisations) and May (from individuals wishing to present academic research papers).
http://bit.ly/1OrQSv6

Internet Freedom Festival
----------------------------------------
March 6-10, 2017
Valencia, Spain
The Internet Freedom Festival gathers the community keeping the Internet open and uncensored for a week of free-form multidisciplinary collaboration intended to help groups achieve their goals. Attendance is free and open to the public.
http://bit.ly/2dI8EV1

Rightscon 2017
----------------------------------------
March 29-31, 2017
Brussels, Belgium
RightsCon will tackle the most pressing issues at the intersection of technology and human rights. Session proposals are being accepted until November 25, 2016.
http://bit.ly/I2ZAUZ

TICTeC 2017
----------------------------------------
April 25-26, 2017
Florence, Italy
This will be the third mySociety conference on the impacts of civic technology.
http://bit.ly/2e5NifJ

Creative Commons Global Summit
----------------------------------------
April 28-30, 2017
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
This event will gather a global community of technologists, academics, activists, creatives, and legal experts to work together on the expansion and growth of the commons, open knowledge, and free culture for all.
http://bit.ly/2cO3x0P

Open Repositories 2017
----------------------------------------
June 26-30, 2017
Brisbane, Australia
The annual Open Repositories Conference brings together users and developers of open digital repository platforms from higher education, government, galleries, libraries, archives and museums. The Conference provides an interactive forum for delegates from around the world to come together and explore the global challenges and opportunities facing libraries and the broader scholarly information landscape.
http://bit.ly/2aOCiGp


***

Hear more from the Information Program!
================================
If you want to hear more from the Information Program team each week, consider subscribing to our shared bookmarks on delicious using this RSS feed:
http://feeds.pinboard.in/rss/secret:95194ab804ccccac713b/u:osi_info_program/

You can also read more about our work on the Open Society Foundations website: http://www.opensocietyfoundations.org/about/programs/information-program

Hear less from the Information Program!
================================
If you wish to unsubscribe from this weekly digest, please send an email with the subject line "Unsubscribe" to info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/

News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week ending 12 February 2016
====================================================

The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF. Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

Our staff, advisers and major grantees tweet at http://bit.ly/13j5fjq. Current and former grantees featured in this issue: Benetech, Digital Rights Ireland, Digitale Gesellschaft, EDRi, EFF, KEI, Open Rights Group, Privacy International, Sunlight Foundation.


NEWS
=====
For breaking news stories, visit: http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:news/

EU: Privacy Shield proposals aim to ease EU-US data transfers
----------------------------------------------------------------------
EDRi calls the European Commission's Privacy Shield arrangement, announced at a February 2 press conference, "badly flawed" as a replacement for the Safe Harbor agreement that previously enabled transfers of EU citizens' personal data to the US despite the disparity in data protection laws. In a second posting, EDRi lists the questions still to be addressed and says the premature announcement leaves the EU without leverage in negotiating with the US. Digitale Gesellschaft argues that the new agreement fails to answer the court's objections. At the Panopticon blog, Christopher Knight notes that the lack of detail means the "Privacy Shield" is, effectively, vapourware; he also reports that the Article 29 Working Party intends to review the compatibility of Binding Corporate Rules and Standard Contract Clauses, the only tools under which transfers can currently take place. In response to the emergency Freedom of Information request EPIC filed with the US and EU for release of the agreement text, the US Department of Commerce has said that the agreement does not exist.
Press conference (video): http://ec.europa.eu/avservices/focus/index.cfm?sitelang=en&focusid=1211
https://edri.org/european-commission-defence-of-european-rights-sinks-in-unsafe-harbour/
https://edri.org/privacyshield-unspinning-the-spin/
Digitale Gesellschaft (German): http://bit.ly/1V8rNcF
Google Translation: http://bit.ly/1Qw3pxA
EPIC: http://bit.ly/1mwtBjx

Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement signed - but not ratified
----------------------------------------------------------------------
On February 2 the 12 countries that make up the Trans-Pacific Partnership signed the controversial global treaty. In Canada, in both a blog posting and Bloomberg TV interview Michael Geist reminds that countries must ratify it before it can take effect, which won't happen for at least two years. Opponents therefore still have a real opportunity to oppose the treaty, especially its implications for privacy, copyright, health and education costs, and dispute resolution. EFF makes many of the same points, but with US detail. In Jewish Business News, American Nobel-Laureate economist Joseph Stiglitz criticises the treaty's investment clauses as being out of touch with the emerging green economy. A Tufts University report concurs, finding that the agreement would lead to job losses and increased economic inequality.
Geist: http://bit.ly/1SLvkQC
Bloomberg: http://bit.ly/1LkGUKj
EFF: http://bit.ly/20Za6Qm
JBN: http://bit.ly/1Xnvc8X
Tufts: http://bit.ly/1SLvmIa

UK: Official reports on Investigatory Powers Bill demand clarity
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The Intelligence and Security Committee and the Joint Committee have both published their reports on the draft Investigatory Powers bill. The ISC report demands greater clarity and also calls for major changes to the provisions on "equipment interference", bulk personal datasets, and communications data retention, complaints welcomed by the Open Rights Group. The Joint Committee calls for greater clarity on, for example, cost models and the definitions of "Internet Connection Records" and "telecommunications service provider", but largely backs the requested government powers including data retention and equipment interference. Cambridge University professor Ross Anderson calls the Joint Committee report "deeply disappointing" and links to the video from the Foundation for Policy Research's recent "Scrambling for Safety" event and a recent Cambridge symposium for more detailed analysis of the bill's proposals. Liberty calls for a full redraft on the basis that "no operational case has been made for the unprecedented powers it proposes" and notes that the bill includes and extends many of the same powers that MPs Tom Watson's and David Davis are challenging in their legal action against the earlier Data Retention and Investigatory Powers Act. Privacy International argues for the removal of thematic warrants, which allow the surveillance of a group or category of people without identifying the individuals in the warrant, from the bill.
ISC: http://bit.ly/1TWAatc
ORG: http://bit.ly/1o9JXk3
Joint Committee: http://bit.ly/1Xnvnkq
Anderson (1): http://bit.ly/1XnvoVv
Scrambling for Safety: http://bit.ly/1PR0ALr
Anderson (2): http://keionline.org/node/2417
Liberty: http://bit.ly/20shRfw
PI: http://bit.ly/1o60hlb

UN panel rules Julian Assange has been arbitrarily detained
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The Guardian, and other sources, attended Julian Assange's press conference, given from the balcony of the Ecuadorian embassy, on the occasion of the UN panel report that found he is subject to "arbitrary detention" and should be released. Human Rights Watch deplores the response from both Sweden and the UK, who argue that the panel ruling changes nothing. Assange remains exactly where he has been for the last 44 months. His lawyer told the Guardian he might consider applying to the European Court of Human Rights (though the Court ruled a similar application inadmissible in December).
Guardian: http://bit.ly/1LkHhVs
HRW: http://bit.ly/1Slx56z

India: Network neurality ruling makes Facebook's "Free Basics" a paid platform
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The Times of India reports that Trai, the telecom regulator in India, which has 138 million Facebook users, has banned differential pricing, the practice of zero-rating specific services and discriminatory pricing on the basis of content. Trai argued that allowing service providers to define the nature of access in a nation where the majority of the population are still unconnected would be the "equivalent of letting TSPs shape the users' internet experience". Almost immediately, Facebook and its India partner, Reliance Communications announced that the Indian "Free Basics" platform, internet.org, would become a paid service.
Times of India (ruling): http://bit.ly/1TcAwvj
Times of India (Facebook move): http://bit.ly/1QbM56O

EU: Court of Human Rights revisits publisher liability
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Deutsche Welle reports that the European Court of Human Rights has ruled that a Hungarian news site was not responsible for readers' offensive comments. The case was an appeal after a Hungarian real estate company sued the site Index.hu. At TechnoLlama, Andrés Guadamuz, a lecturer in intellectual property law at the University of Sussex, argues that the case rewrites the 2015 Delfi decision but expects further legal debate.
http://www.dw.com/en/news-sites-not-responsible-for-insulting-reader-comments-echr/a-19020733
http://www.technollama.co.uk/european-court-of-human-rights-revisits-intermediary-liability

Ireland: Challenging the data protection commissioner
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Digital Rights Ireland has instructed its lawyers to serve legal papers on the Irish government, challenging whether the office of the Irish Data Protection Commissioner is truly independent, as required by EU law. DRI argues that the Irish DPC is of critical importance in the EU because so many technology companies are located there, but that it has failed to properly implement the EU's data protection law - the Schrems case, which began in Ireland, being an obvious example.
DRI: http://bit.ly/1Qw4ntG

FEATURES AND ANALYSIS

====================
For more features and analysis selected by the Program team, visit:
http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:oped/

US: Criminal justice databases raise privacy questions
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The Sunlight Foundation's newly launched Hall of Justice is a searchable repository of publicly available criminal justice datasets and research. The 18-month project required manual entry of data sourced from over 9,000 publicly available databases at many locations across the US. While the Supreme Court has ruled that inmates forfeit their privacy while in prison, Sunlight asks whether that situation should be permanent. Sunlight goes on to consider specific cases, such as mugshots, and asks why these should be part of the public domain.
Sunlight (launch): http://bit.ly/1V8t57p
Sunlight (inmates): http://bit.ly/1owShdu
Sunlight (pre-conviction data): http://bit.ly/1Qw4DZH

The changing nature of surveillance
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this report, "Don't Panic: Making Progress on the 'Going Dark' Debate", published by the Berkman Center's Berklett Cybersecurity project, a group of security and policy experts from academia, civil society, and the intelligence community including Bruce Schneier, Susan Landau, and Jonathan Zittrain, examine the claims that intelligence services are "going dark" and losing access to the data they need to conduct investigations. Among their findings: ubiquitous encryption is unlikely both for business reasons and because software ecosystems are so fragmented, and networked sensors and the Internet of Things are likely to grant government far greater remote monitoring availability than has ever been available before. New technology, therefore, will provide complementary channels that will drastically change surveillance.
Berkman: http://bit.ly/1KKd0UO

Algorithmic living and editing reality
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Twitter's widely reported rumours - since denied by the company - that Twitter was considering implementing an algorithm to determine the contents of users' timelines led to several interesting commentaries on the social consequences of such a decision. In this blog posting that cites not only the Twitter rumours but Google's announced plan to show "positive messages" to those seeking out hate speech, policy analyst Marcy Wheeler says such imposed selection turns reality into "an algorithm of the popular" that replaces today's serendipity with a living dream world. In a blog posting, podcast, and video lecture for the LSE Data and Society project, University of Maryland professor and Black Box Society author Frank Pasquale discusses how algorithm-driven, data-based decisions might be regulated in the interests of social justice.
Wheeler: http://bit.ly/1Pr45Xf
LSE: http://bit.ly/1mwuxV7
LSE (video): http://bit.ly/1Pr4bhQ

Amazon's book monopoly
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this series of videos from the Open Markets Program, speakers at the Amazon's Book Monopoly event on January 27 discuss what Amazon's stranglehold on the market means for American readers as individuals and for democracy in general. Authors such as Scott Turow and Susan Cheever join publishers, agents, and academics in considering whether, as has been suggested by a group of authors, anti-trust authorities should be taking action to curb Amazon's power.
Open Markets: http://bit.ly/1LkHJCW

Blocking access to culture for the visually impaired
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting, Pirate Party MEP Julia Reda writes about the European Parliamentary vote intended to put pressure on certain governments - notably the UK and Germany - that are blocking ratification of the Marrakesh treaty, which would grant a copyright exception for the visually impaired. So far, only 20 of the 79 signatories have ratified the treaty, which was finalised in 2013. At the Benetech blog, CEO Jim Fruchterman characterises the situation as "If you can buy a book you can't borrow it" and sets out the case for passage as well as similar issues for deaf people. Knowledge Ecology International reports that this week President Obama sent a memo urging the US Senate to ratify the treaty.
Reda: http://bit.ly/20ZaTAx
Benetech: http://bit.ly/1TWBlZV
KEI: http://bit.ly/240NIIx

Flight of the eagles
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This page at IEEE Spectrum, which includes a video clip, discusses successful Dutch police efforts to train eagles to capture and take down wayward drones.
IEEE Spectrum: http://bit.ly/1TcBhEr

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DIARY
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To see more events recommended by the Information Program team, visit:
https://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:events/. If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

Laura Poitras at the Whitney Museum
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February 5-May 1, 2016
New York, NY
Oscar and Pulitzer Prize-winning Laura Poitras, best known for her documentary film about Edward Snowden, CITIZENFOUR, has turned her journal and FBI files into an exhibit at New York's Whitney Museum documenting her life under surveillance. LAURA POITRAS: ASTRO NOISE is an immersive installation of new work building on topics Poitras has investigated in previous film work, including mass surveillance, the war on terror, the U.S. drone program, Guantánamo Bay Prison, occupation, and torture.
http://bit.ly/1QbMuq2

Meeting on Dutch hacking proposal
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February 16, 2016
Amsterdam, Netherlands
This meeting, convened by Bits of Freedom, will discuss the Dutch government's legislative proposals to allow police to hack computers of all types, from smartphones to cars.
BoF (Dutch): bit.ly/1PCMHMj
Google Translated: bit.ly/1PkQ1Qj

SPARC Meeting on Openness in Research and Education
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March 7-8, 2016
San Antonio, Texas
The SPARC MORE meeting builds on the "Convergence" theme of its 2014 meeting and will explore the increasingly central role libraries are playing in the growing shift toward Open Access, Open Education and Open Data. Join us as leaders from the library community, academia, industry, student community, and other research avenues discuss how open access, open data, and open educational resources are intersecting, and the impact this convergence will have on research and discovery. The meeting is designed to emphasize collaborative actions that stakeholders can take to positively impact publishing, policy, digital repositories, author rights, and licensing.
http://bit.ly/1OW0HVK

Open Education Week
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March 7-11, 2016
Open Education Week is a celebration of the global Open Education Movement. Its purpose is to raise awareness about the movement and its impact on teaching and learning worldwide. Participation in all events and use of all resources are free and open to everyone. Anyone can submit videos, resources, and requests for listings to be featured on the Open Education Week Events calendar.
http://bit.ly/AcKcba

Ethical Risk Assessment in Biomedical Big Data
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March 14-15, 2016
Oxford, UK
The two-day symposium, hosted by the Oxford Internet Institute, in association with the Brocher Foundation, will bring together expertise from academia, medicine, industry, and the non-profit sector to assess the ethical risks posed by a number of emerging Big Data applications. Risk assessment is an important step in understanding the potential impact (effects and consequences) of any emerging technology. Applications across a variety of research, clinical and commercial domains will be analysed, including biobanking, public health surveillance, outbreak monitoring, digital epidemiology, behaviour tracking and profiling, and other types of biomedical research.
http://bit.ly/1YCUTmE

Predictive Analytics and Human Rights
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The 2016 conference, hosted at the Bernstein Institute for Human Rights at the NYU Law School, will leverage the interdisciplinary strengths of the Robert L. Bernstein Institute to consider the human rights implications of the varied uses of predictive analytics by state actors. As a core part of this endeavour, the conference will examine - and seek to advance - the capacity of human rights practitioners to access, evaluate, and challenge risk assessments made through predictive analytics by governments worldwide.
http://bit.ly/1owT4uV

RightsCon
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March 30-April 1, 2016
San Francisco, CA
Convened by Access Now, RightsCon is the world's leading conference on the issues at the intersection of internet and human rights. The event brings together visionaries, technologists, business leaders, activists, and government representatives from around the world to build strategies, highlight emerging voices, and showcase new technologies & initiatives in pursuit of tomorrow's internet. March 30 will feature Crypto Summit 2.0, a discussion of global encryption policy.
http://bit.ly/I2ZAUZ

We Robot
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April 1-2, 2016
Miami, Florida
Founded by law professors Michael Froomkin and Ryan Calo, We Robot is a workshop-style conference at which papers in progress on subjects related to robots, law, and policy are discussed and debated with a goal to improving the quality of scholarship in this developing area.
http://bit.ly/1jtd6TT

Global Privacy Summit
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April 3-4
Washington, DC
The annual meeting of the International Association of Privacy Professionals. Last year's event included keynotes from journalist Glenn Greenwald, author Sarah Lewis, and Google general counsel Kent Walker.
http://bit.ly/1PVL5Ta

25th World Wide Web Conference
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April 11-15, 2016
Montreal, Canada
The W3C's World Wide Web Conference is an annual international conference on the topics of the future direction of the World Wide Web. The Conference is an outstanding international forum to present and discuss progress in research, development, standards, and applications of the topics related to the Web.
http://bit.ly/1SrCR32

OER16: Open Culture
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April 19-20
Edinburgh, Scotland
The vision for the conference is to focus on the value proposition of embedding open culture into institutional strategies for learning, teaching, and research. Conference chairs are Melissa Highton, Director of Learning, Teaching, and Web Services at the University of Edinburgh, and Lorna Campbell, OER Liaison at the University of Edinburgh and EDINA Digital Education Manager.
http://bit.ly/1PVLBRj

TICTeC 2016
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April 27-29, 2016
Barcelona, Spain
The Impacts of Civic Technology Conference will focus on the impact of civic technology and digital democracy on citizens, decision makers, and governments around the world and discuss themes of engagement, participation, institution, social behaviour, politics, community, digital capability, communication, and ethics relating to the use and study of civic technology.
http://bit.ly/1Qw5kCe

ICOA 2016
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May 16-17
Montreal, Canada
The 18th International Conference on Open Access aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results about all aspects of Open Access. It also provides the premier interdisciplinary forum for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns, practical challenges encountered and the solutions adopted in the field of Open Access.
http://bit.ly/1XCAD2a

International Conference for E-Democracy and Open Government
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May 18-20, 2016
Krems, Austria
The International Conference for e-Democracy and Open Government brings together e-democracy, e-participation and open government specialists working in academia, politics, government and business to critically analyse the innovations, issues, ideas and challenges in the networked societies of the digital age.
http://bit.ly/1MPGnmf

Privacy in the Digital Age of Encryption and Anonymity Online
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May 19-20, 2016
The Hague, Netherlands
This conference on privacy in the digital age of encryption and anonymity online is jointly organised by EIPA and Europol. The main theme of the conference will be the difficulty of balancing privacy and security with a focus on the latest systems of encryption, anonymisation, and pseudonymisation.
http://bit.ly/1O6wu0N

Health Privacy Summit
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June 6-7
Washington, DC
The 2016 Health Privacy Summit brings together top national and international experts for serious discussion about global health privacy issues and realistic solutions and to ask, Is Big Data effectively the beginning of the end for privacy in health care?
http://bit.ly/1Qw5AkN

Personal Democracy Forum
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June 9-10
New York, NY
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The conference will feature speakers such as Kate Crawford, Douglas Rushkoff, and Anil Dash.
http://bit.ly/1ExPHDH

Workshop on the Economics of Information Security
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June 13-14, 2016
Berkeley, CA
The Workshop on the Economics of Information Security (WEIS) is the leading forum for interdisciplinary scholarship on information security and privacy, combining expertise from the fields of economics, social science, business, law, policy, and computer science.
http://bit.ly/1RgmF6w

SOUPS
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June 22-24
Denver, Colorado
The 12th Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security will bring together an interdisciplinary group of researchers and practitioners in human computer interaction, security, and privacy. The program will feature technical papers, workshops and tutorials, a poster session, panels and invited talks, and lightning talks.
http://bit.ly/1Tn7bwy

21st-Century Literacies for Public Libraries
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August 10-11, 2016
Philadelphia, PA
At this two-day satellite meeting, presented by IFLA's Public Libraries Section, delegates will share and learn from each other's experiences in developing and delivering services that encompass today's expanded concept of literacy, which includes not only the traditional ability to read and write but proficiency in a range of other literacies such as civic, health, financial, digital, and information.
http://bit.ly/1WhAXnq

IFLA World Library and Information Congress
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August 13-19, 2016
Columbus, OH
The theme of the 82nd IFLA Congress is "Connections. Collaboration. Community." The Congress will feature programmes from myriad library sectors.
http://2016.ifla.org/

Privacy+Security Forum
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October 24-26, 2016
Washington, DC
Monday, October 24, is devoted to pre-conference workshops and "intensive days" - advanced discussion focused narrowly on a particular topic or industry. Proposals are welcome until April 30, 2016 based on the following guiding principles: bridge the silos between privacy and security; cover issues with depth and rigour; employ interaction, scenario-based learning, and extensive engagement; deliver practical takeaways from each session.
http://bit.ly/1RIzYhV

Mozilla Festival
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November 6-8, 2016
London, UK
MozFest is an annual celebration of the open Web. Participants are diverse, including engineers, artists, activists, and educators, but share the common belief that the Web can make lives better, unlocks opportunity, spurs creativity, teaches valuable skills, and connects far-flung people and ideas. The Festival seeks to improve the Web with new ideas and creations.
http://bit.ly/1WmxRQ0

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