News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week ending 25 November 2016
====================================================

The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF. Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

Our staff, advisers and major grantees tweet at http://bit.ly/13j5fjq. Current and former grantees featured in this issue: EFF, Open Rights Group.


NEWS
=====
For breaking news stories, visit: http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:news/

US confirms end of Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The Guardian reports that the White House has confirmed the end of the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement as Congressional leaders have indicated they will not pass the trade deal before President Obama leaves office; president-elect Donald Trump repeatedly attacked the deal during the election campaign. EFF assesses the damage in other countries: New Zealand has now passed the implementing legislation required to ratify TPP, including an extension to copyright to author's life plus 70 years. In Japan, the ratifying bill has passed the lower house. Finally, the remaining countries, led by Mexico and Japan, may decide to conclude the agreement without the US.
Guardian: http://bit.ly/2fIVfHV
EFF: http://bit.ly/2gjLVtV

UK: Parliament passes the Investigatory Powers bill
----------------------------------------------------------------------
ZDNet reports that the Investigatory Powers bill - also knows as the "Snooper's Charter" - has passed both houses of Parliament and now merely awaits Royal Assent to become law. The law will require internet service providers to store every customer's real-time top-level web history for up to a year; force companies to decrypt data on demand; and allow intelligence agencies to hack into all computer hardware ("bulk equipment interference"). Open Rights Group executive director Jim Killock has called the bill "the most extreme surveillance law ever passed in a democracy". At its blog, ORG cites chapter five of its 2015 report to remind readers that Donald Trump's incoming US administration is likely to have access to all this data, given the close relationship between the NSA and GCHQ. However, the Guardian reports that Germany fears Britain's EU departure plans may cause it to pull out of an EU intelligence-sharing program intended to combat terrorism and promote security. Computer Weekly notes that opposing organizations include the National Union of Journalists and that the legal challenge mounted by the MPs Tom Watson and David Davis (now withdrawn) against the bill's predecessor, the Data Protection and Investigatory Powers Act, is still pending in the European Court of Justice.
ZDNet: http://zd.net/2fse15p
ORG: http://bit.ly/2fVyByW
Guardian: http://bit.ly/2g7TpAU
CW: http://bit.ly/2fIYQp9

Cameroon: Government launches campaign against social media
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Global Voices reports that the government of Cameroon has launched a campaign against social media; the government-controlled Cameroon Tribune has called social media "a threat to peace and a secret instrument of manipulation". After a recent train derailment, pictures and videos of the accident were being posted on Facebook, Twitter, and other platforms while the government was still denying the accident had taken place.
Global Voices: http://bit.ly/2fVpTRf

Russian hackers target US political NGOs and think tanks
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Security journalist Brian Krebs reports that according to a report from the DC-based cyber incident response firm Volexity, shortly after Donald Trump became the presumptive US president-elect, the Russian "The Dukes" hacker gang launched a series of targeted phishing campaigns against American political think tanks and NGOs. The Dukes is best known for hacking into computer networks at the US Democratic National Committee. Volexity provides the details of the five waves of attacks so far but notes they are ongoing; the firm believes the hackers are working to gain long-term access to the networks of the groups they're targeting.
Krebs: http://bit.ly/2gEbLgj
Volexity: http://bit.ly/2fVBBLC

Facebook gears up to fight fake news
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The Guardian reports that a week after denying that fake news could influence voters - and a few days after the German Justice Minister indicates that he believes Facebook should be regulated like a media company - Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced initiatives to tackle the dissemination of misinformation on his company's platform. A Buzzfeed analysis found that fake election news stories outperformed real news on Facebook. Buzzfeed also reports that teens in the Balkans are duping Trump supporters with fake news. At Medium, ethnographer Christine Xu compares the state of fake news and propaganda in the US and China, where the media are so distrusted that misinformation is easily spread via family and friends. Monday Note editor Frederic Filloux analyses the way the mainstream media's changed business model helped drive Donald Trump to the presidency. The New York Times reports that meanwhile Facebook has been developing software to enable a third party to suppress posts in individuals' news feeds in specific geographic areas; the initiative is believed to be intended to give the company access to the Chinese market. The Verge reports that Facebook has acquired Crowdtangle, a software company whose products were being used by journalists to track the spread of fake news, and also that a list of "fake news sites" compiled by Massachusetts journalism professor Melissa Zimdar, rapidly publicized by major news organizations, included many satire and parody websites, as well as Private Eye's own site and, reports IB Times, Breitbart.
Guardian: http://bit.ly/2fsmxkO
Reuters: http://reut.rs/2gpWOLM
Buzzfeed (outperformance): http://bzfd.it/2fbrBi4
Buzzfeed (Macedonia): http://bzfd.it/2gjUPaI
Monday Note: http://bit.ly/2fJcyIH
NY Times: http://nyti.ms/2fsp5zb
Verge: http://bit.ly/2gjRrwv
IBTimes: http://bit.ly/2fVCaoV

Regulating smart cars
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting at the Center for Democracy and Technology, Joseph Jerome discusses how smart cars should be regulated. The US National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is charged with regulating motor vehicle safety, but privacy and cyber security lie outside its realm of experience and expertise, and it has sent mixed signals about whether it reviews these as safety issues. Also potentially involved are the Federal Trade Commission, whose consumer protection mandate includes privacy, and the Federal Communications Commission, which has the power to regulate technologies, such as broadband, that it designates as telecommunications services. Jerome hopes the three will collaborate effectively.
CDT: http://bit.ly/2gpSXi9

FEATURES AND ANALYSIS
====================
For more features and analysis selected by the Program team, visit:
http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:oped/

Code programmers are ashamed of writing
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this Medium, Bill Sourour discusses code he remains ashamed of having written and urges other programmers to think about the effects of their code before they write it. The post has set off myriad confessions from programmers about the unethical and illegal things they've been asked to do, which Business Insider summarizes. Many argue that ethics should be included in computer science and programming courses. Sourour was originally inspired to write his post by the video of Bob Martin's talk "The Future of Programming".
Medium: http://bit.ly/2gpW89a
BusinessInsider: http://read.bi/2fbqKOp
YouTube (Martin): http://bit.ly/2fVHI2L

Internet freedom under pressure
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this report, Freedom House studies the state of app and social media crackdowns worldwide. In the interests of blocking access, 15 governments worldwide have shut down the entire internet or mobile network. Among the key findings for 2016: for the sixth consecutive year internet freedom has declined; 67% of internet users live in countries which censor criticism of the government, military, or ruling family; 38 countries (27%) have made arrests based on social media postings; secure, speedy apps like WhatsApp are increasingly the target of government action. The worst-scoring countries for internet freedom are China, Iran, Syria, and Ethiopia. Online Censorship's report covering April to November 2016 finds increasing numbers of complaints about politically-motivated censorship, much of it pertaining to the US election.
Freedom House: http://bit.ly/2fvarKW
Online Censorship (PDF): http://bit.ly/2fVDSXl

Liberia: Lessons from the attack that may not have happened
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting, Access Now discusses the recent reports that the entire country of Liberia was taken offline by a botnet attack. Security researchers, officials, and Access Now's local partners all have reported no effective decline in connectivity. However, given that connectivity to Liberia and many other countries on the West coast of Africa is primarily supplied by a single submarine cable, Access Now argues that much greater attention needs to be paid to resilience and that we need to make it harder to shut down the internet. Steve Song discusses the costs of data connections in Africa, noting that it costs more to get data from Africa's interior countries to the coast than it does the rest of the way to Europe.
Access Now: http://bit.ly/2fVDtUx
Song: http://bit.ly/2gl4iCt

Ethics all the way down
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this TED talk video, Zeynep Tufecki argues that machine intelligence can fail in ways that humans won't predict and that therefore we can't outsource our decisions to machines: "It's ethics all the way down." In a podcast discussion at O'Reilly Radar, data scientist Hilary Mason makes similar points while discussing current research projects at her company Fast Forward Labs and the barriers to adopting AI.
TED: http://bit.ly/2fvaZjP
O'Reilly: http://oreil.ly/2fbBlJc

Children's rights and data protection
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting at the LSE Media Policy Project, Ghent professor Eva Lievens discusses the impact of the new General Data Protection Regulation on children's rights. Among her concerns are the provisions requiring parental consent for children under 16; treating children over that age as adults with respect to data processing; and the omission of age-related concerns from the many other articles in the regulation. Ghent will begin a four-year research project to evaluate this law critically and monitor its implementation on children, and Lievens urges other researchers to help provide an in-depth, evidence-based understanding of how children's right to privacy and data protection should be protected.
LSE: http://bit.ly/2gEhGSt


***

DIARY
==============
To see more events recommended by the Information Program team, visit:
https://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:events/. If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

Digital Democracy workshop
November 27, 2016
London, England
The Digital Democracy afternoon workshop, a collaboration of Cybersalon and the Digital Liberties Register, will explore digital deliberation and how to design online participatory processes that work for and empower everyone.
http://bit.ly/2gl7z4w

Latin America in a Glimpse
----------------------------------------
December 5, 2016
Guadalajara, Mexico
Derechos Digitales, IFEX-ALC, and Coding Rights (Brazil) will present a summary of the most important trends of the past year in digital rights in Latin America. The roundtable discussions are intended to help the international community to connect and better understand the reality of human rights on the internet in Latin America. Main topics will be digital surveillance and the right to be forgotten.
http://bit.ly/2g83opK

Internet Governance Forum
----------------------------------------
December 6-9, 2016 (TBC)
Guadalajara, Mexico
With the UN's renewal in December 2015, the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) consolidates itself as a platform to bring people together from various stakeholder groups as equals, in discussions on public policy issues relating to the Internet. While there is no negotiated outcome, the IGF informs and inspires those with policy-making power in both the public and private sectors. At their annual meeting delegates discuss, exchange information and share good practices with each other.
http://bit.ly/28YwZPX

Open Government Partnership Summit
----------------------------------------
December 7-9, 2016
Paris, France
Representatives from governments, academia, civil society and international organizations will gather to share their experiences and best practices and push forward the open government global agenda in light of the great challenges of the modern world. As a forum for sharing best practices, OGP provides a unique platform that brings together, stimulates and expands the community of state reformers worldwide.
http://bit.ly/2b1IY0Q

Privacy Camp
----------------------------------------
January 24, 2017
Brussels, Belgium
Co-organised by EDRi, Privacy Salon, USL-B, and VUB-LSTS, the fifth annual Privacy Camp brings together civil society, policy makers, and academia to discuss existing and looming problems for human rights in the digital environment.
http://bit.ly/2evfpa9

Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection
----------------------------------------
January 25-27, 2017
Brussels, Belgium
The tenth CPDP's main theme is artificial intelligence. The conference is accepting proposals for panels in April (from academic consortia, research projects, think tanks, and other research organisations) and May (from individuals wishing to present academic research papers).
http://bit.ly/1OrQSv6

Internet Freedom Festival
----------------------------------------
March 6-10, 2017
Valencia, Spain
The Internet Freedom Festival gathers the community keeping the Internet open and uncensored for a week of free-form multidisciplinary collaboration intended to help groups achieve their goals. Attendance is free and open to the public.
http://bit.ly/2dI8EV1

Rightscon 2017
----------------------------------------
March 29-31, 2017
Brussels, Belgium
RightsCon will tackle the most pressing issues at the intersection of technology and human rights. Session proposals are being accepted until November 25, 2016.
http://bit.ly/I2ZAUZ

We Robot
----------------------------------------
March 31-April 1, 2017
New Haven, Connecticut
The sixth annual We Robot will be held at Yale Law School and will focus on the coming legal and policy conflicts as robots and AI become part of daily life.
http://bit.ly/2fVF2SI

TICTeC 2017
----------------------------------------
April 25-26, 2017
Florence, Italy
This will be the third mySociety conference on the impacts of civic technology.
http://bit.ly/2e5NifJ

Creative Commons Global Summit
----------------------------------------
April 28-30, 2017
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
This event will gather a global community of technologists, academics, activists, creatives, and legal experts to work together on the expansion and growth of the commons, open knowledge, and free culture for all.
http://bit.ly/2cO3x0P

IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy
----------------------------------------
May 22-24, 2017
San Jose, California
The 38th annual meeting will present developments in computer security and electronic privacy, and for bringing together researchers and practitioners in the field.
http://www.ieee-security.org/TC/SP2017/index.html

Workshop on Technology and Consumer Protection
----------------------------------------
May 22-24, 2017
San Jose, California
Co-hosted with the IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy, ConPro will explore computer science topics with an impact on consumers. This workshop has a strong security and privacy slant, with an overall focus on ways in which computer science can prevent, detect, or address the potential for technology to deceive or unfairly harm consumers.
http://bit.ly/2fJ6ShN

Open Repositories 2017
----------------------------------------
June 26-30, 2017
Brisbane, Australia
The annual Open Repositories Conference brings together users and developers of open digital repository platforms from higher education, government, galleries, libraries, archives and museums. The Conference provides an interactive forum for delegates from around the world to come together and explore the global challenges and opportunities facing libraries and the broader scholarly information landscape.
http://bit.ly/2aOCiGp

IFLA World Libraries and Information Congress
----------------------------------------
August 19-25, 2017
Wroclaw, Poland
The theme of the 83rd annual IFLA congress will be "Achieving a healthy future together: diverse and emerging roles for health information professionals".
http://bit.ly/2gErkVa

***

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News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week ending 11 November 2016
====================================================

The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF. Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

Our staff, advisers and major grantees tweet at http://bit.ly/13j5fjq. Current and former grantees featured in this issue: EFF, Privacy International.


NEWS
=====
For breaking news stories, visit: http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:news/

US elects Donald Trump as 45th president
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In the wake of Donald Trump's election as US president, the Guardian reports that Facebook is being accused of spreading misinformation and "fake news". Two weeks ago, the New York Times critiqued the methods used by the USC/LA Times poll to explain why two unusual weightings made it the only outlier that consistently predicted Trump's victory. CS Monitor summarises what's known about the president-elect's likely cyber security policies. EFF blogs that Trump's victory ends all chance of passing the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement, but warns that other countries are still passing the necessary supporting legislation, and therefore the impact of the copyright provisions will remain. At The Intercept, Glenn Greenwald writes angrily about the failure of Western institutions and elites to take seriously the suffering of those left out of their comfort zone.
Guardian: http://bit.ly/2fH8XhL
NY Times: http://nyti.ms/2eJdb3V
CS Monitor: http://bit.ly/2fHFHUb
EFF: http://bit.ly/2fHIP40
Intercept: http://bit.ly/2eYyxuZ

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg under investigation in Germany
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Reuters reports that Munich prosecutors are investigating Mark Zuckerberg and other Facebook executives over a complaint that Facebook has failed to remove 438 hate speech and seditious postings that are contrary to German law. Similar charges have already been dismissed by the Hamburg court, but Bavaria may take a different view.
Reuters: http://reut.rs/2fCMkbG

UAE surveillance contractor recruits hackers
----------------------------------------------------------------------
BoingBoing reports that the UAE-based company DarkMatter, which describes itself as a major state security contractor, has been bombarding sophisticated security experts with recruitment emails. Near-hires say the job is weaponising zero-day vulnerabilities so the UAE can carry out fine-grained surveillance against its citizens. DarkMatter, which has poached staff from companies like Google, Qualcomm, McAfee, and encrypted messaging service Wickr, denies the claims. BoingBoing notes that DarkMatter is believed to have hired the team that carried out the Stealth Falcon attack on journalists.
BoingBoing: http://bit.ly/2fWBZLt

UK Investigatory Powers Tribunal challenged in European Court of Justice
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Human Rights Watch reports that it and six individuals have taken a challenge to the European Court of Justice to demand that the UK Investigatory Powers Tribunal confirm whether or not the individuals were subject to surveillance by GCHQ, as well as whether the surveillance was lawful. The case is based on claims filed with the tribunal in 2015; in that case, the tribunal dismissed the claims of individuals not resident in the UK and issued a "no determination" ruling for the rest. Meanwhile, The Register reports that the Investigatory Powers Bill has completed its passage through Parliament but Royal Assent is being delayed for a week. At issue is an amendment that would force press to join the government-approved regulator created after the phone hacking scandals.
HRW: http://bit.ly/2fH9Fvb
Register: http://bit.ly/2fH3DLk

Iceland: Pirate Party wins ten parliamentary seats
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The New York Times reports that Iceland's Pirate Party came in second in the country's October 30 general election, giving it ten parliamentary seats out of 63. The Register adds that the Pirate Party has, however, rejected the offer of a seat in the coalition government the conservative Independent Party will now form, saying it is "looking to make a change, not to gain power".
NY Times: http://nyti.ms/2eYCS16
Register: http://bit.ly/2fq2lRD

CJEU rules that IP addresses can be personal data
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Ars Technica reports that the European Court of Justice has ruled that dynamic IP addresses - that is, Internet Protocol addresses assigned temporarily, for example by a mobile network operator - can be personal data. German Pirate Party politician Patrick Breyer had brought an action asking the courts to issue an injunction preventing websites from collecting and storing his dynamic IP address so that German authorities could not build up a picture of his interests. CJEU ruled that such IP addresses could be personal data if the website in question had additional information that allowed it to identify individuals. In its blog, the Bird & Bird legal firm discusses the judgment in detail, and says the ruling may have substantial impact on analytics and other standard industry practices.
Ars Technica: http://bit.ly/2ePdwFv


FEATURES AND ANALYSIS
====================
For more features and analysis selected by the Program team, visit:
http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:oped/

Brazil: The battle for encryption
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this posting, Privacy International discusses the situation regarding encryption in Brazil, where WhatsApp has been asked to disable its encryption to aid criminal investigations even though no law limits the use of encryption. The core of the investigations is being kept secret; however, draft bills legalising blocking applications such as frequent target WhatsApp are under debate in the National Congress.
PI: http://bit.ly/2g2p226

The internet is loosening our grip on the truth
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this New York Times article, Farhad Manjoo argues that the internet is loosening our grip on the truth, using the just-concluded "fact-free" US presidential election as Exhibit A. Manjoo weighs studies of the internet's echo chamber effect, and finds that even documentary proof is losing its power to persuade, while lies have become institutionalised despite the rise of a mass of fact-checking sites. Manjoo does not consider the wider influence of partisan mass media.
NY Times: http://nyti.ms/2fpX5xv

Principles for countering violent extremism online
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting, Access Now introduces a policy guide for proposals to prevent or counter violent extremism online. Such proposals are "a minefield for human rights", and risk blocking satire, political protest, journalism, and community activism; they also risk undermining existing law protecting freedom of expression and privacy. The guide offers principles and recommendations.
Access Now: http://bit.ly/2eJbIun

The future of open education
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting at the E-Learn blog, Willem van Valkenburg discusses the future of open education, comparing and contrasting US and European strategies. The US has converged on Open Textbooks, while Europe has diverged in the direction of open science, which van Valkenburg describes as a much broader process of opening up universities. He suggests that the US strategy will have the bigger short-term impact but that over the longer term Open Science will have a much broader impact on society.
E-Learn: http://bit.ly/2fWzOHX

How open data won the Leave campaign
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this BBC news report, Laura Kuenssberg looks back at Britain's Leave campaign and discovers that Vote Leave hired physicists, data experts, and digital specialists to build its own tools in order to mine publicly available data in new and sophisticated ways. The resulting Voter Information Collection System was able to pinpoint exactly which doors to knock on, tightly focussing the online Leave campaign and "win the data war" that most in Westminster had no idea was underway.
BBC: http://bbc.in/2fH3OpY

How the web became unreadable
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this posting at Medium, MicroFormats co-founder Kevin Marks analyses the rise across the web of skinny, grey, low-contrast type that is unreadable to most people. Marks explains contrast ratios and traces the fad to the Typography Handbook and other design advice which promote the view that too much contrast induces eyestrain. In a new large-scale usability study, Nielsen-Norman Group finds that the usability errors they first identified in 1996 continue in 2016 to frustrate users.
Medium: http://bit.ly/2eJdVpo
NNGroup: http://bit.ly/2fWCsgM


***

DIARY
==============
To see more events recommended by the Information Program team, visit:
https://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:events/. If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

OpenCon
----------------------------------------
November 12-14, 2016
Washington, DC
At this event, the next generation can learn about Open Access, Open Education, and Open Data, develop critical skills, and catalyse action toward a more open system of research and education. OpenCon will convene students and early career academic professionals, both in person and through satellite events around the world and serve as a powerful catalyst for projects led by the next generation to advance OpenCon's three focus areas.
http://bit.ly/1OocSMD

WIPO Standing Committee on Copyright and Related Rights
----------------------------------------
November 14-16, 2016
Geneva, Switzerland
Topics at the 33rd meeting of SCCR will include the protection of broadcasting organisations, exceptions and limitations for libraries and archives, limitations and exceptions for educational and research institutions and for persons with disabilities, and proposals for analysing copyright with respect to the digital environment and to include the resale right in future work.
http://bit.ly/2bi2lF9

Data Transparency Lab
----------------------------------------
November 16-19, 2016
New York, NY
This conference incorporates three colocated events. DTL will explore topics such as transparency, the ad blocking arms race, and privacy metrics. Fairness and Accountability in Machine Learning will bring together a growing community of researchers and practitioners. Finally, The Workshop on Data and Algorithmic Transparency will convene an emerging interdisciplinary community that seeks transparency and oversight of data-driven algorithmic systems through empirical research.
http://bit.ly/2eGJMb2

Internet Governance Forum
----------------------------------------
December 6-9, 2016 (TBC)
Guadalajara, Mexico
With the UN's renewal in December 2015, the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) consolidates itself as a platform to bring people together from various stakeholder groups as equals, in discussions on public policy issues relating to the Internet. While there is no negotiated outcome, the IGF informs and inspires those with policy-making power in both the public and private sectors. At their annual meeting delegates discuss, exchange information and share good practices with each other.
http://bit.ly/28YwZPX

Open Government Partnership Summit
----------------------------------------
December 7-9, 2016
Paris, France
Representatives from governments, academia, civil society and international organizations will gather to share their experiences and best practices and push forward the open government global agenda in light of the great challenges of the modern world. As a forum for sharing best practices, OGP provides a unique platform that brings together, stimulates and expands the community of state reformers worldwide.
http://bit.ly/2b1IY0Q

Privacy Camp
----------------------------------------
January 24, 2017
Brussels, Belgium
Co-organised by EDRi, Privacy Salon, USL-B, and VUB-LSTS, the fifth annual Privacy Camp brings together civil society, policy makers, and academia to discuss existing and looming problems for human rights in the digital environment.
http://bit.ly/2evfpa9

Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection
----------------------------------------
January 25-27, 2017
Brussels, Belgium
The tenth CPDP's main theme is artificial intelligence. The conference is accepting proposals for panels in April (from academic consortia, research projects, think tanks, and other research organisations) and May (from individuals wishing to present academic research papers).
http://bit.ly/1OrQSv6

Internet Freedom Festival
----------------------------------------
March 6-10, 2017
Valencia, Spain
The Internet Freedom Festival gathers the community keeping the Internet open and uncensored for a week of free-form multidisciplinary collaboration intended to help groups achieve their goals. Attendance is free and open to the public.
http://bit.ly/2dI8EV1

Rightscon 2017
----------------------------------------
March 29-31, 2017
Brussels, Belgium
RightsCon will tackle the most pressing issues at the intersection of technology and human rights. Session proposals are being accepted until November 25, 2016.
http://bit.ly/I2ZAUZ

TICTeC 2017
----------------------------------------
April 25-26, 2017
Florence, Italy
This will be the third mySociety conference on the impacts of civic technology.
http://bit.ly/2e5NifJ

Creative Commons Global Summit
----------------------------------------
April 28-30, 2017
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
This event will gather a global community of technologists, academics, activists, creatives, and legal experts to work together on the expansion and growth of the commons, open knowledge, and free culture for all.
http://bit.ly/2cO3x0P

Open Repositories 2017
----------------------------------------
June 26-30, 2017
Brisbane, Australia
The annual Open Repositories Conference brings together users and developers of open digital repository platforms from higher education, government, galleries, libraries, archives and museums. The Conference provides an interactive forum for delegates from around the world to come together and explore the global challenges and opportunities facing libraries and the broader scholarly information landscape.
http://bit.ly/2aOCiGp


***

Hear more from the Information Program!
================================
If you want to hear more from the Information Program team each week, consider subscribing to our shared bookmarks on delicious using this RSS feed:
http://feeds.pinboard.in/rss/secret:95194ab804ccccac713b/u:osi_info_program/

You can also read more about our work on the Open Society Foundations website: http://www.opensocietyfoundations.org/about/programs/information-program

Hear less from the Information Program!
================================
If you wish to unsubscribe from this weekly digest, please send an email with the subject line "Unsubscribe" to info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

This digest operates under the OSF privacy policy: http://www.opensocietyfoundations.org/about/policies/privacy

Additionally, it uses the bit.ly URL shortening service, which operates under the following privacy policy: http://bit.ly/pages/privacy/

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/


News digest | Open Society
Information Program | Week ending 28 October 2016


====================================================



The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF. Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.


Our staff, advisers and major grantees tweet at http://bit.ly/13j5fjq. Current and former grantees featured in this issue: Bits of Freedom, Digitale Gesellschaft, EDRi, Open Rights Group.

NEWS

=====

For breaking news stories, visit: http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:news/


Canada-EU Trade Agreement negotiations break down

----------------------------------------------------------------------

On October 27, following weeks of dispute, the Belgian region of Wallonia accepted amendments and withdrew its opposition to the Canada-EU Trade Agreement. The previous week, the Guardian had reported that the Canadian international trade minister, Chrystia Freeland, had walked out of talks intended to salvage the agreement, which Wallonia opposed fearing the impact on its agricultural sector. Freeland told CBC that the EU is incapable now of concluding an international treaty, while Canadian copyright scholar Michael Geist has been predicting the collapse of CETA for some months. Paul Magnette, Wallonia's minister-president, was also concerned about Investor-State Dispute Settlement, and has won the concession that Belgium will be able to go to the European Court of Justice to determine whether ISDS is compatible with EU law. Maclean's offers more background on Wallonia's opposition to the treaty.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/oct/27/belgium-reaches-deal-with-wallonia-over-eu-canada-trade-agreement

CBC: http://bit.ly/2e8tNq6

Geist: http://bit.ly/2fKZqGL

Maclean's: http://bit.ly/2e8rzXJ


Internet of Things botnet cripples the internet

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Security journalist Brian Krebs, whose own site was attacked just weeks ago by a botnet running the Mirai malware on devices such as DVRs, cameras, and baby monitors, reports that a massive and sustained internet attack on the domain name system service provider Dyn resulted in widespread outages and network congestion, disabling access to sites such as Twitter, Amazon, Tumblr, Reddit, Spotify, and Netflix. Krebs also reports that the Chinese manufacturer of many of the devices used in the attack is issuing both a recall and a libel suit. Techcrunch reports that the security company Flashpoint, which has analysed the attacks, believes the attack was carried out by copycat "script kiddies" rather than sophisticated state-sponsored actors.

Krebs (attack): http://bit.ly/2eGFbWA

Krebs (recall): http://bit.ly/2eGIQUe

Techcrunch: http://tcrn.ch/2fCci2I


UK: Digital Economy bill endangers privacy, freedom of speech

----------------------------------------------------------------------

The Open Rights Group reports three main areas of concern with the Digital Economy bill, currently at the committee stage in the House of Commons: the bill proposes to introduce ten-year prison sentences for file-sharers; it will require age verification for all commercial websites offering pornography to UK internet users; and it increases data sharing between government departments without sufficient safeguards or transparency. In addition, Computing reports that a group of MPs are seeking to amend the bill to add the power to issue regulations compelling search engines to delist sites linked to piracy and remove other content.

ORG: http://bit.ly/2ev7pWD

Computing: http://bit.ly/2eGHnNM


Digital Rights Ireland challenges EU-US Privacy Shield

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Reuters reports that Digital Rights has filed a legal challenge asking the General Court to annull the EU-US Privacy Shield data transfer agreement. To date, more than 500 companies have signed up to Privacy Shield, including Google, Facebook, and Microsoft. The court, which is the lower court of the European Court of Justice, is expected to take at least a year to rule on the case (Case T-670/16).

Reuters: http://reut.rs/2f1ofwQ


Google drops ban on personally identifiable web tracking

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Pro Publica's Julia Angwin reports that Google has quietly dropped the ban on personally identifiable web tracking it adopted in 2007 when it acquired the advertising network DoubleClick. Users may opt out via their privacy settings, but by default Google now uses what it knows about them from Gmail and other services to customise the DoubleClick ads that follow them around the web. In this move, Google follows similar moves by other companies such as Facebook, erasing the industry's longstanding claim that web tracking is mostly anonymous. In a blog posting, Doc Searls issues a call to action to blow up the surveillance economy.

Pro Publica: http://bit.ly/2fCgZcX

Searls: http://bit.ly/2eGHfxC


Facebook caught allowing advertisers to discriminate by race

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Pro Publica's Julia Angwin and Terry Parris Jr report that a shopping exercise showed that Facebook's system allows advertisers to exclude black, Hispanic and other "ethnic affinities" from seeing their ads, a practice that is prohibited by federal US law in the areas of housing and employment. Facebook explained that "ethnic affinity" is not the same as race; it is assigned to members based on the pages and posts they have engaged with or liked.

Pro Publica: http://bit.ly/2fm8Xl4



FEATURES AND ANALYSIS

====================

For more features and analysis selected by the Program team, visit:

http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:oped/


Privacy for kids

----------------------------------------------------------------------

In this booklet, which may be freely re-distributed, EDRi offers kids advice on protecting their privacy online. Written by an international group of NGOs that included Bits of Freedom, Open Rights Group, Digitale Gesellschaft, ApTI Romania, Mediamocracy, and many others, the booklet includes tips on safer messaging, smart phone and social media use, passwords, photo and video sharing, a list of privacy apps, and a brief guide to using the encrypted messaging service Signal. The booklet is written in English but the group is coordinating an effort to translate it into as many languages as possible.

EDRi: http://bit.ly/2eGKFR3


The costs to nations of internet shutdowns

----------------------------------------------------------------------

This report commissioned by the Global Network Initiative, prepared by Deloitte, and sponsored by Facebook, estimates the economic cost of government-mandated internet shutdowns at .4% to 1.9% of the country's GDP for each day on which all internet services are shut down depending on how connected the country is. The Brookings Institute has documented 81 such shutdowns in the year between July 2015 and June 2016. GNI estimates that the ongoing shutdown in Ethiopia is costing the country a little under US$500,000 a day in lost GDP.

GNI: http://bit.ly/2foEMrT


Nepal: The state of open access

----------------------------------------------------------------------

In this interview posted at the Open Knowledge Foundation, three leading advocates of open access in Nepal discuss their work. Jagadish Aryal outlines his work with libraries; Kshitiz Khanal talks about open science and research; and Roshan Kumar Karn explains the situation with respect to open access, open education, open data, and open repositories. Khanal notes that much of the potential of Nepalese students and academics is wasted because so few conduct research and publish papers.

OKFN: http://bit.ly/2fjhaWP


US: Privacy protection for foreigners still limited

----------------------------------------------------------------------

EFF examines Presidential Policy Directive 28, a document US President Barack Obama has used to claim that new rules extend to foreigners privacy protections previously reserved solely for American citizens. EFF concludes that the safeguards provided are inadequate, and that the directive has made no significant change to the actual surveillance the US conducts. The reality, EFF concludes, is that, "the US government's surveillance powers against foreigners is nearly absolute."

EFF: http://bit.ly/2fjzykx


Using open data to change existing power dynamics

----------------------------------------------------------------------

In this blog posting reviewing the recent International Open Data Conference, The Engine Room acting executive director Julia Keseru asks whether the community is doing its best to change existing power dynamics. To overcome the current disillusionment with the power of open data, she suggests that the focus needs to shift from opening data as an end in itself to open data as a tool for change. Projects need clear problem statements, accountability, and context.

Engine Room: http://bit.ly/2fCg4cl


Understanding lone-actor terrorism

----------------------------------------------------------------------

In this video of the third of the lunchtime briefings presented by the VOX-Pol project, "Understanding Lone-Actor Terrorism", UCL lecturer Paul Gill explores online radicalisation and its causes. Terrorist attacks are not always purely ideological in motivation and may take years to plan, which gives intelligence time to prevent them. Gill's extensive research finds underlying individual and organisational motivations that must be taken into account in devising policy. Extremist organisations have long advised lone actors that they will be most successful with small-scale attacks as these are more difficult to detect but individuals have been hard to motivate. This situation has changed with ISIS because the direct feed from social media to TV provides that missing motivation.

VOX-Pol: http://bit.ly/2ev9ZM5



***


DIARY

==============

To see more events recommended by the Information Program team, visit:

https://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:events/. If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.


ODI Summit

----------------------------------------

November 1, 2016

London, UK

The annual Open Data Institute Summit will feature inspiring stories from around the world on how people are innovating with the web of data, and presentations from diverse innovators, from current startup founders to experienced, high-profile speakers such as World Wide Web inventor Tim Berners-Lee, AI expert Nigel Shadbolt and Lastminute.com founder Martha Lane Fox.

http://bit.ly/2ar2aXf


ICANN 57

----------------------------------------

November 3-9, 2016

Hyderabad, India

ICANN meetings provide a venue for progressing policy work, conducting outreach, exchanging best practices, conducting business deals, interacting among members of the ICANN Community, including board and staff, and learning about ICANN.

http://bit.ly/29CmNg9


Mozilla Festival

----------------------------------------

November 6-8, 2016

London, UK

MozFest is an annual celebration of the open Web. Participants are diverse, including engineers, artists, activists, and educators, but share the common belief that the Web can make lives better, unlocks opportunity, spurs creativity, teaches valuable skills, and connects far-flung people and ideas. The Festival seeks to improve the Web with new ideas and creations.

http://bit.ly/1WmxRQ0


OpenCon

----------------------------------------

November 12-14, 2016

Washington, DC

At this event, the next generation can learn about Open Access, Open Education, and Open Data, develop critical skills, and catalyse action toward a more open system of research and education. OpenCon will convene students and early career academic professionals, both in person and through satellite events around the world and serve as a powerful catalyst for projects led by the next generation to advance OpenCon's three focus areas.

http://bit.ly/1OocSMD


WIPO Standing Committee on Copyright and Related Rights

----------------------------------------

November 14-16, 2016

Geneva, Switzerland

Topics at the 33rd meeting of SCCR will include the protection of broadcasting organisations, exceptions and limitations for libraries and archives, limitations and exceptions for educational and research institutions and for persons with disabilities, and proposals for analysing copyright with respect to the digital environment and to include the resale right in future work.

http://bit.ly/2bi2lF9


Data Transparency Lab

----------------------------------------

November 16-19, 2016

New York, NY

This conference incorporates three colocated events. DTL will explore topics such as transparency, the ad blocking arms race, and privacy metrics. Fairness and Accountability in Machine Learning will bring together a growing community of researchers and practitioners. Finally, The Workshop on Data and Algorithmic Transparency will convene an emerging interdisciplinary community that seeks transparency and oversight of data-driven algorithmic systems through empirical research.

http://bit.ly/2eGJMb2


Internet Governance Forum

----------------------------------------

December 6-9, 2016 (TBC)

Guadalajara, Mexico

With the UN's renewal in December 2015, the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) consolidates itself as a platform to bring people together from various stakeholder groups as equals, in discussions on public policy issues relating to the Internet. While there is no negotiated outcome, the IGF informs and inspires those with policy-making power in both the public and private sectors. At their annual meeting delegates discuss, exchange information and share good practices with each other.

http://bit.ly/28YwZPX


Open Government Partnership Summit

----------------------------------------

December 7-9, 2016

Paris, France

Representatives from governments, academia, civil society and international organizations will gather to share their experiences and best practices and push forward the open government global agenda in light of the great challenges of the modern world. As a forum for sharing best practices, OGP provides a unique platform that brings together, stimulates and expands the community of state reformers worldwide.

http://bit.ly/2b1IY0Q


Privacy Camp

----------------------------------------

January 24, 2017

Brussels, Belgium

Co-organised by EDRi, Privacy Salon, USL-B, and VUB-LSTS, the fifth annual Privacy Camp brings together civil society, policy makers, and academia to discuss existing and looming problems for human rights in the digital environment.

http://bit.ly/2evfpa9


Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection

----------------------------------------

January 25-27, 2017

Brussels, Belgium

The tenth CPDP's main theme is artificial intelligence. The conference is accepting proposals for panels in April (from academic consortia, research projects, think tanks, and other research organisations) and May (from individuals wishing to present academic research papers).

http://bit.ly/1OrQSv6


Internet Freedom Festival

----------------------------------------

March 6-10, 2017

Valencia, Spain

The Internet Freedom Festival gathers the community keeping the Internet open and uncensored for a week of free-form multidisciplinary collaboration intended to help groups achieve their goals. Attendance is free and open to the public.

http://bit.ly/2dI8EV1


Rightscon 2017

----------------------------------------

March 29-31, 2017

Brussels, Belgium

RightsCon will tackle the most pressing issues at the intersection of technology and human rights. Session proposals are being accepted until November 25, 2016.

http://bit.ly/I2ZAUZ


TICTeC 2017

----------------------------------------

April 25-26, 2017

Florence, Italy

This will be the third mySociety conference on the impacts of civic technology.

http://bit.ly/2e5NifJ


Creative Commons Global Summit

----------------------------------------

April 28-30, 2017

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

This event will gather a global community of technologists, academics, activists, creatives, and legal experts to work together on the expansion and growth of the commons, open knowledge, and free culture for all.

http://bit.ly/2cO3x0P


Open Repositories 2017

----------------------------------------

June 26-30, 2017

Brisbane, Australia

The annual Open Repositories Conference brings together users and developers of open digital repository platforms from higher education, government, galleries, libraries, archives and museums. The Conference provides an interactive forum for delegates from around the world to come together and explore the global challenges and opportunities facing libraries and the broader scholarly information landscape.

http://bit.ly/2aOCiGp



***


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News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week ending 14 October 2016
====================================================

The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF. Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

Our staff, advisers and major grantees tweet at http://bit.ly/13j5fjq. Current and former grantees featured in this issue: EDRi, EFF, Open Knowledge Foundation.

PROGRAM NEWS
==============
This posting describes how 23 NGOs, including OSF grantees AK Vorrat, EDRi, La Quadrature du Net, Bits of Freedom, and Digitale Gesellschaft, achieved the win for network neutrality in Europe.
https://osf.to/2dymljW


NEWS
=====
For breaking news stories, visit: http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:news/

EU publishes copyright directive
----------------------------------------------------------------------
EDRi reports that the EU's proposals for copyright reform, published September 14, "could not conceivably be worse", highlighting that the directive threatens to bring in filtering for all internet uploads, create legal uncertainty for European hosting companies, and create a new 20-year "ancillary copyright" giving publishers the right to control links to their material. The Internet Archive calls it an "absolute disaster", noting that the proposal also fails to protect freedom of panorama. Wikimedia writes that the proposals fail to consider the needs and rights of users. Intellectual Property Watch provides a thorough analysis of the proposals.
EU Parliament: http://bit.ly/2ebnl24
Internet Archive: http://bit.ly/2e5HOll
Wikimedia: http://bit.ly/2dHPKKh
IP Watch: http://bit.ly/2e5JlYJ

Internet governing body transitions to independence
----------------------------------------------------------------------
At The Register, Kieren McCarthy reports that despite a last-minute lawsuit led by US Senator Ted Cruz asking a Texas judge to issue a temporary restraining order, the US government allowed its contract with the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority, which oversees global allocation of technical internet functions to expire at 12:01 AM Washington DC time on October 1. Stewardship has transferred to the private non-profit Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, which was set up in 1998 to manage the domain name system. ICANN will decide the internet's future development. McCarthy reviews the last 15 years of ICANN's efforts to achieve independence. Organisations such as the Internet Society published congratulations.
Register: http://bit.ly/2dTSEgu
NTIA: http://bit.ly/2dsLQmJ
Internet Society: http://bit.ly/2e2nqW4

Bangladesh issues "smart" national identity cards
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Global Voices reports that the Bangladeshi government has begun issuing Smart National ID cards as part of the Digital Bangladesh Initiative which should see the cards distributed to 100 million people. The biometric cards, which will be associated with individuals' mobile SIM cards, will include 32 types of citizen data and offer access to 23 services, including voting, banking, tax payments, share-trading, and applications for passport, driving licences, and trade licences. The government says the goal is to reduce forgery, which was common with the laminated cards previously used for voting, but Global Voices suggests the new system will create new technical glitches and security risks. Citizens' reactions have been mostly positive.
Global Voices: http://bit.ly/2dhdG7C

First Internet of Things botnet attack detected
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The investigative security journalist Brian Krebs reported at the end of September that his website had been forced offline by a botnet attack of such unprecedented size that his hosting provider, Akamai, asked him to find a new provider. On October 1, Krebs reported that the source code for the Miral malware that powered the attack has been publicly released on Hackforums, opening the way for myriad copycat attacks by new botnets powered by insecure routers, IP cameras, digital video recorders, and other insecure, easily hackable devices. In a further posting, Krebs discusses which devices are being targeted by Miral, which he says are easily identified by examining the list of user names and passwords included in the source code. Finally, Krebs notes that the European Commission is drafting new cybersecurity requirements to improve security around Internet of Things devices. Bruce Schneier argues that government intervention in this area is essential because it is a market failure neither manufacturers nor consumers can fix.
Krebs (attack): http://bit.ly/2dhdOUL
Krebs (source code): http://bit.ly/2ebnSB3
Krebs (devices): http://bit.ly/2dY8Fzc
Krebs (Europe): http://bit.ly/2e2pNs6
Schneier: http://bit.ly/2dHQdff

Switzerland passes broad surveillance law
----------------------------------------------------------------------
At Ars Technica, Glyn Moody reports that in a referendum Swiss citizens have backed, by 65.5% to 34.5%, a new law that will allow the Swiss intelligence agency to break into computers, install malware, spy on phone and internet communications, and install microphones and video cameras in private locations. The Swiss government expects the new powers, intended to be used against terrorism, espionage, the dissemination of weapons of mass destruction, and attacks on important national infrastructure, to be invoked only about ten times a year. Previously, the Guardian reports, the Swiss had relied on other countries' intelligence agencies, as they were banned from tapping phones and surveilling email. Using the new powers will require approval from a federal court, the defence ministry, and the cabinet.
Ars Technica: http://bit.ly/2dFSk4D
Guardian: http://bit.ly/2e2TSSU

Yahoo! accused of secretly scanning private email to aid FBI
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Reuters reports that Yahoo, already under fire for a recently-announced 2014 data breach that exposed the personal information of an estimated 500 million users, complied with a secret directive issued by the FBI to scan the private email of its users. EPIC links the system described in the report to the similar FBI program "Carnivore", while EFF discusses the legal and technical questions the report raises and reiterates its call, filed as a lawsuit against the Department of Justice in April 2016, on the Department of Justice to publicly release all decisions of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, including that pertaining to Yahoo. Anonymous former Yahoo employees have told Motherboard that when security staff discovered the scanning system and raised the alarm, they thought it was a "buggy rootkit"; they were told to leave it alone. In a follow-up report Reuters adds detail on the legal basis for the government's request and notes that Yahoo, which is being acquired by Verizon, has called the story "misleading" and said that "the mail scanning described in the article does not exist on our systems." Separately, the New York Times discusses recent legal challenges by Microsoft and the ACLU on behalf of Open Whisper Systems to the increasing US government use of gag orders covering requests for user information.
Reuters: http://reut.rs/2emY5oO
EPIC: http://bit.ly/2dRxTjD
EFF: http://bit.ly/2en0ik1
Motherboard: http://bit.ly/2eboHdl
Reuters (legal): http://reut.rs/2dsO45g
NY Times: http://nyti.ms/2dMNx0z

Ethiopia: Government blocks internet access
----------------------------------------------------------------------
At Africa News, Abdur Rahman Alfa Shaban reports that following nationwide protests, on October 7 the Ethiopian government cut both mobile and fixed-line access to the internet, partially restoring fixed-line access later in the day. Cyber Ethiopia summarises a Brookings report that finds that similar cuts to internet access cost the country US$9 million in 2015. The same report estimates the global cost of internet shutdowns at US$2.4 billion.
Africa News: http://bit.ly/2dHUMGr
Cyber Ethiopia: http://bit.ly/2dsSNnG


FEATURES AND ANALYSIS
====================
For more features and analysis selected by the Program team, visit:
http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:oped/

Driving copyright out of education
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting for the Open Knowledge Foundation's Open Education Working Group, Communia's Lisette Kalshoven examines the problems copyright poses for education. The 2001 EU copyright directive included an optional exception for education which many member states have not implemented; Finland, for example, has no provision for derivative works in education, which bars teachers from translating foreign-language news articles. The EU's proposed reform directive creates a mandatory exception but limits its application, leaving it unclear how the old and new exceptions will interact and leaving many uses not covered. Communia is launching a project to advocate for effective change. At Education in Crisis, Alek Tarkowski argues that we need to drive copyright out of the classroom by creating an exception that covers all educational uses, including home schoolers, libraries, and museums, which often must pay licence fees.
OKFN: http://bit.ly/2dRzg1K
Education in Crisis: http://bit.ly/2dTV0vX

The Gikii approach to future challenges
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this series of presentations, participants in the 2016 Gikii conference draw on pop culture to discuss emerging technology, policy conundrums, and legal conflicts. Especially notable are Paul Bernal's slides showing the difficulty of deciding who is an online troll, Andres Guadamuz's proposals for regulating augmented reality such as the game Pokemon Go, Alison Harcourt's outline of the migration of copyright regulation from legislation to industry standards fora, and Philip Howard's proposals for regulating a civic Internet of Things, which include reporting the ultimate beneficiary of collected data.
Gikii: http://bit.ly/2dYaD2L

Lessons from ten years of open data
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting at the Sunlight Foundation, Alex Howard offers ten take-aways from the 2016 International Open Data conference. While diversity is improving, Howard regrets the loss of focus on government transparency and accountability and the general absence from the conference of politicians and journalists, while suggesting that governments need to be more aggressive about opening data sets where it's already clear there is public demand.
Sunlight: http://bit.ly/2d9mbhG

How to steal an election
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article at Bloomberg Business Week, Michael Riley, Jordan Robertson, and David Kocieniewski investigate the state of US voting machines, purchased after the 2000 Bush-Gore election under the Help America Vote Act. The market for these machines, many of which depend on buggy, insecure, antiquated technology, is dominated by just a few manufacturers, which impose unexpected ongoing costs that the original federal funding to buy the machines does not cover. The Bloomberg story focuses in particular on a recent election in Memphis, Tennessee, where approximately 40% of votes in a crucial district went missing. In a separate story, Elizabeth Dexheimer reports that 21 states have contacted the US Department of Homeland Security requesting help after reports surfaced that state systems are being scanned by malicious cyber actors. Bob Sullivan asks long-time voting machine researcher Harri Hursti to comment on claims that Russia is behind attacks on US voting systems.
Bloomberg: http://bloom.bg/2dI81dU
Bloomberg (Dexheimer): http://bloom.bg/2dYdto2
Sullivan: http://bit.ly/2dFSbOn

Living safely with automation
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this essay at the Guardian, Tim Harford suggests that reliance on automation is setting us up for disaster as, like airline pilots, we become more used to manipulating computer systems than directly running the systems they control. Harford applies lessons drawn from aviation, where this "mode confusion" causes plane crashes such as Air France flight 447, to council decisions and self-driving cars. Harford concludes by examining the work of Dutch traffic engineer Hans Monderman, who solved such conundrums by removing cues such as street signs and forcing drivers, pedestrians, and cyclists to engage with each other in navigating messy terrain, an approach that sounds risky but that in practice proved to be safer for all concerned.
Guardian: http://bit.ly/2dRA8n8

Data ethics for philanthropists
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this Upturn report, David Robinson and Miranda Bogen discuss the risks and opportunities for philanthropists seeking to invest in projects involving data at scale. Among the risks the authors list a lack of shared standards for human subject review, a lack of mathematical literacy within foundations, and the concentration of data and analytics in the private sector. The authors recommend eight questions foundations should answer in assessing such projects, and provide guidelines for managing them.
Upturn: http://bit.ly/2dhgSQT

***

DIARY
==============
To see more events recommended by the Information Program team, visit:
https://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:events/. If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

Transparency Camp 2016
----------------------------------------
October 14-15, 2016
Cleveland, OH
The Sunlight Foundation chose Cleveland for this year's unconference in order to tap into the local expertise of an area with strong grassroots organisers and clear problems the community is trying to solve. The event aims to bring together librarians, government officials, technologists, civic leaders, community organisers, and others to figure out strategies and solutions for making local and state governance better, faster, smarter and more transparent.
http://bit.ly/2aP6RaV

Freedom not Fear
----------------------------------------
October 14-17, 2016
Brussels, Belgium
At Freedom not Fear, civil society members meet to plan for and engage in action against increasing surveillance and other attacks on civil rights. The meeting, intended for civil rights and freedom activists from across Europe, is organised by volutneers and coordinated by EDRi member Digitalcourage and via the akv-international mailing list.
http://bit.ly/2cmKWrM

Privacy+Security Forum
----------------------------------------
October 24-26, 2016
Washington, DC
Monday, October 24, is devoted to pre-conference workshops and "intensive days" - advanced discussion focused narrowly on a particular topic or industry. Proposals are welcome until April 30, 2016 based on the following guiding principles: bridge the silos between privacy and security; cover issues with depth and rigour; employ interaction, scenario-based learning, and extensive engagement; deliver practical takeaways from each session.
http://bit.ly/1RIzYhV

ODI Summit
----------------------------------------
November 1, 2016
London, UK
The annual Open Data Institute Summit will feature inspiring stories from around the world on how people are innovating with the web of data, and presentations from diverse innovators, from current startup founders to experienced, high-profile speakers such as World Wide Web inventor Tim Berners-Lee, AI expert Nigel Shadbolt and Lastminute.com founder Martha Lane Fox.
http://bit.ly/2ar2aXf

ICANN 57
----------------------------------------
November 3-9, 2016
Hyderabad, India
ICANN meetings provide a venue for progressing policy work, conducting outreach, exchanging best practices, conducting business deals, interacting among members of the ICANN Community, including board and staff, and learning about ICANN.
http://bit.ly/29CmNg9

Mozilla Festival
----------------------------------------
November 6-8, 2016
London, UK
MozFest is an annual celebration of the open Web. Participants are diverse, including engineers, artists, activists, and educators, but share the common belief that the Web can make lives better, unlocks opportunity, spurs creativity, teaches valuable skills, and connects far-flung people and ideas. The Festival seeks to improve the Web with new ideas and creations.
http://bit.ly/1WmxRQ0

OpenCon
----------------------------------------
November 12-14, 2016
Washington, DC
At this event, the next generation can learn about Open Access, Open Education, and Open Data, develop critical skills, and catalyse action toward a more open system of research and education. OpenCon will convene students and early career academic professionals, both in person and through satellite events around the world and serve as a powerful catalyst for projects led by the next generation to advance OpenCon's three focus areas.
http://bit.ly/1OocSMD

WIPO Standing Committee on Copyright and Related Rights
----------------------------------------
November 14-16, 2016
Geneva, Switzerland
Topics at the 33rd meeting of SCCR will include the protection of broadcasting organisations, exceptions and limitations for libraries and archives, limitations and exceptions for educational and research institutions and for persons with disabilities, and proposals for analysing copyright with respect to the digital environment and to include the resale right in future work.
http://bit.ly/2bi2lF9

Internet Governance Forum
----------------------------------------
December 6-9, 2016 (TBC)
Guadalajara, Mexico
With the UN's renewal in December 2015, the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) consolidates itself as a platform to bring people together from various stakeholder groups as equals, in discussions on public policy issues relating to the Internet. While there is no negotiated outcome, the IGF informs and inspires those with policy-making power in both the public and private sectors. At their annual meeting delegates discuss, exchange information and share good practices with each other.
http://bit.ly/28YwZPX

Open Government Partnership Summit
----------------------------------------
December 7-9, 2016
Paris, France
Representatives from governments, academia, civil society and international organizations will gather to share their experiences and best practices and push forward the open government global agenda in light of the great challenges of the modern world. As a forum for sharing best practices, OGP provides a unique platform that brings together, stimulates and expands the community of state reformers worldwide.
http://bit.ly/2b1IY0Q

Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection
----------------------------------------
January 25-27, 2017
Brussels, Belgium
The tenth CPDP's main theme is artificial intelligence. The conference is accepting proposals for panels in April (from academic consortia, research projects, think tanks, and other research organisations) and May (from individuals wishing to present academic research papers).
http://bit.ly/1OrQSv6

Internet Freedom Festival
----------------------------------------
March 6-10, 2017
Valencia, Spain
The Internet Freedom Festival gathers the community keeping the Internet open and uncensored for a week of free-form multidisciplinary collaboration intended to help groups achieve their goals. Attendance is free and open to the public.
http://bit.ly/2dI8EV1

Rightscon 2017
----------------------------------------
March 29-31, 2017
Brussels, Belgium
RightsCon will tackle the most pressing issues at the intersection of technology and human rights. Session proposals are being accepted until November 25, 2016.
http://bit.ly/I2ZAUZ

TICTeC 2017
----------------------------------------
April 25-26, 2017
Florence, Italy
This will be the third mySociety conference on the impacts of civic technology.
http://bit.ly/2e5NifJ

Creative Commons Global Summit
----------------------------------------
April 28-30, 2017
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
This event will gather a global community of technologists, academics, activists, creatives, and legal experts to work together on the expansion and growth of the commons, open knowledge, and free culture for all.
http://bit.ly/2cO3x0P

Open Repositories 2017
----------------------------------------
June 26-30, 2017
Brisbane, Australia
The annual Open Repositories Conference brings together users and developers of open digital repository platforms from higher education, government, galleries, libraries, archives and museums. The Conference provides an interactive forum for delegates from around the world to come together and explore the global challenges and opportunities facing libraries and the broader scholarly information landscape.
http://bit.ly/2aOCiGp


***

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News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week of 23 September 2016
====================================================

The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF. Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

Our staff, advisers and major grantees tweet at http://bit.ly/13j5fjq. Current and former grantees featured in this issue: EDRi, EFF, La Quadrature du Net, SPARC Europe, .


NEWS
=====
For breaking news stories, visit: http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:news/

EU: Advocate-General says EU is competent to ratify Marrakesh treaty
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Intellectual Property Watch reports that the standstill over the Marrakesh Treaty, which grants a copyright exception for visually impaired people, could soon be broken. The Advocate-General of the European Court of Justice has found in response to a challenge by EU members including France, Finland, the UK, and Hungary that the EU has exclusive competence to ratify the Treaty.
IP Watch: http://bit.ly/2d2S8wb

Kashmir: India suspends mobile internet access
----------------------------------------------------------------------
At Slate, Hasit Shah reports that for more than two months India has blocked mobile internet access in Kashmir in response to protests in July following the death of a local militant commander. Newspapers in Kashmir, he writes, are calling the situation, which blocks access to organising via social media, an "e-curfew". The New Indian Express reports that postpaid mobile phone services, which along with broadband were suspended on September 12, have been restored. Greater Kashmir reports that journalists have staged a sit-in protest, calling the suspension an "indirect gag" on media.
Slate: http://slate.me/2cEg9rY
New Indian Express: http://bit.ly/2cO132v
Greater Kashmir: http://bit.ly/2cVP6K7

EU: Court of Justice rules that linking can infringe copyright
----------------------------------------------------------------------
La Quadrature du Net reports that the European Court of Jusice has set aside the recommendation the Advocate General issued in April and ruled that posting a link to illegally published content is itself a copyright violeation as long as the site is non-profit and is unaware of the copyright violation. Aside from the obvious implications for search engines, LQDN notes that it is difficult for any individual to be sure if a linked work is an infringement or not. LQDN also notes that this decision aligns with the proposal in the leaked draft copyright Directive to give publishers greater power over links. EFF calls the ruling "madness" and "a gift to copyright holders".
LQDN: http://bit.ly/2cjscrL
Advocate General (PDF): http://bit.ly/2dg5XrJ
Judgment: http://bit.ly/2d1lUmt
EFF: http://bit.ly/2ddiR72

Facebook struggles with automated content editing
----------------------------------------------------------------------
At the Guardian, Sam Thielman reports that a couple of months after the world discovered that Facebook's trending topics were hand-picked by a team of editors, the company has replaced the human editors with an algorithm. The result: mayhem, as the algorithm for example chose to highlight a false story about Fox News host Megyn Kelly as well as a hoax article about 9/11. The Guardian also reports that Facebook deleted the famous "napalm girl" photograph from a posting about historical warfare photography by a Norwegian writer, and followed up by deleting a post by the Norwegian Prime Minister defending the posting and republishing the photograph. The story led journalists and others to suggest that Facebook needs to learn to use more wisely its power over the news people see. This is also the theme of the recent report Tech Giants and Civic Power, written by Martin Moore, director of the Centre for the Study of Media Communication and Power in the Policy Institute at King's College London.
Guardian (algorithm): http://bit.ly/2d4NRWl
Guardian (photograph): http://bit.ly/2ddjIVn
Moore (PDF): http://bit.ly/2dcowtp

EU: Plan for Gigabit Society threatens network neutrality
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Access Now reports that the European Commission's plan for a European Gigabit Society, which aims to promote high-quality networks and 5G, incorporates the first attack on the EU's new network neutrality rules. The plan specifically mentions developing high-speed networks to facilitate gaming and streaming audio and video; Access Now argues that high-quality networks should benefit the internet as a whole without creating "fast lanes". In a July 2016 manifesto that European Digital Rights called "terrible", a collection of telcos argued that the creation of 5G will require substantial state subsidies as well as a rollback on European privacy and network neutrality laws. Access Now was one of 30 NGOs that signed an open letter to policy makers arguing against these demands.
Access Now (plan): http://bit.ly/2d7NUFn
EDRi: http://bit.ly/2cEhv6g
Access Now (letter, PDF): http://bit.ly/2cVPVCS

Open access boosts citation rates
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Times Higher Education Supplement reports on a new study by the University of Michigan's Jim Ottaviani that finds that publishing journal articles under open access boosts citations by more than a fifth. The effect is even greater on better-cited papers, though the reason for this is unclear. SPARC Europe maintains a list of such studies as well.
THES: http://bit.ly/2cMNUrZ
SPARC: http://bit.ly/2ddjtK0

Facebook announces WhatsApp will share personal data
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The Guardian reports that although Facebook promised it would not share personal data between the two services when it purchased WhatsApp, the company will begin doing just that, including personal phone numbers, in order to help advertisers target ads. EPIC has filed a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission, the UK's Information Commissioner has said the office will keep a close watch, and MEP Jan-Philipp Albrecht is working on developing EU policy to protect users' privacy in such cases. At the Guardian, John Naughton offers instructions on using WhatsApp's privacy settings to block the transfer.
Guardian (WhatsApp): http://bit.ly/2d1o9pB
EPIC: http://bit.ly/2cr4hdh
Guardian (UK ICO): http://bit.ly/2dg7wWw
Guardian (EU): http://bit.ly/2cVODYD
Guardian (Naughton): http://bit.ly/2clQ0An

India: Delhi University wins copyright case
----------------------------------------------------------------------
At SpicyIP, Shamnad Basheer reports that the Delhi high court has dismissed suits by three international publishers - Oxford University Press, Cambridge University Press, and Taylor & Francis - who had jointly objected to the sale of photocopied books, chapters, and pages at Delhi University. The ruling is expected to have a far-reaching impact on copyright law in India. Basheer, one of the group of academics who intervened in the case, argued that the photocopying was fair use given its educational purpose. In his 94-page ruling, Justice Rajiv Sahai Endlaw wrote that copyright is not a "divine" right.
SpicyIP: http://bit.ly/2cjuuaf


FEATURES AND ANALYSIS
====================
For more features and analysis selected by the Program team, visit:
http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:oped/

US: Department of Justice seeks mass hacking powers
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this opinion piece for Wired, professors Matt Blaze (University of Pennsylvania) and Susan Landau (Worcester Polytechnic Institute) and Senator Ron Wyden (D-OR) warn that under plans published as amendments to Rule 41 of the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure, the FBI would be allowed to hack as many as a million computers based on a single warrant. Unless Congress acts to block the proposals, the rules will come into effect on December 1. To counter the plan, Wyden and fellow Senator Rand Paul (R-KY) have introduced the Stopping Mass Hacking Act. EFF is collecting signatures on a petition backing the bill.
Wired: http://bit.ly/2dg7wWJ
Wyden: http://bit.ly/2cr5r8B
EFF: http://bit.ly/2cr40XD

Spain: Exercising the right to know
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting, mySociety highlights a collaboration among Access Info Europe, Civio Foundation, and the Transparency Council of Spain to celebrate September 28's International Right to Know Day by simplifying the complex process of submitting an FOI request in Spain. The Spanish government requires a difficult-to-obtain electronic certificate or digital identification; the authorities also refuse to accept requests by email. From now until September 28, however, requesters can use a Google form, a Twitter hashtag, or email to file requests, which the three organisations will forward using their certificates.
MySociety: http://bit.ly/2d1pb4V

Pardoning Edward Snowden
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this editorial, the Washington Post, one of the newspapers that originally published the details of leaked programmes such as PRISM, argues that Edward Snowden should not be pardoned despite a national campaign asking President Barack Obama to do so before leaving office. Meanwhile, the New York Times' A.O. Scott reviews Oliver Stone's new movie, "Snowden", calling it "an honorable and absorbing contribution", but ultimately prefers Laura Poitras's documentary, Citizenfour. At Techdirt, Mike Masnick pores over the recently released House Intelligence Committee's report on Snowden, and highlights myriad misleading or false statements that lead him to call the report a "smear campaign".
Washington Post: http://wapo.st/2clR5Ik
Pardon Snowden: http://bit.ly/2cQablM
NY Times: http://nyti.ms/2cjuU0r
TechDirt: http://bit.ly/2cMQLBf

The internet infrastructure under attack
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this essay, Bruce Schneier outlines attacks he's seeing that appear to have the purpose of probing the defences of companies that run critical pieces of the internet infrastructure, he believes with the intent of learning how to take them down. While the data is inconclusive, he says the perpetrator "feels like" a large nation-state.
Schneier: http://bit.ly/2cVQCvL

The war on cash
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article at The Long and Short, Brett Scott discusses the human rights issues surrounding the cashless society that's being promoted by countries such as Sweden, vendors such as Visa and Penny for London, and "thought leaders" such as Chyp Hyperion's Dave Birch. Scott goes on to suggest ways for those seeking to protect the rights of already marginalised groups to reframe opposing the "Death of Cash" as a fight for retaining the choice to carry out financial transactions without the need for intermediaries.
Long and Short: http://bit.ly/2d1pa11


***

DIARY
==============
To see more events recommended by the Information Program team, visit:
https://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:events/. If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

The Open Exchange for Social Change
----------------------------------------
October 4, 2016
Madrid, Spain
This pre-IOCD unconference aims to create a space where participants can exchange knowledge and understanding and build solidarity that will lead to better outcomes for IODC and beyond. It is an open space so that attendees can propose the most relevant and urgent topics for their work.
http://bit.ly/2aEpFg1

International Open Data Conference
----------------------------------------
October 6-7
Madrid, Spain
At IODC16, governments, civil society, multilateral organisations, and private companies will gather around a roadmap. the International Open Data Charter, in order to keep improving the governability, citizen engagement, innovation, and international development of open data initiatives.
http://bit.ly/1HQuPNW

Transparency Camp 2016
----------------------------------------
October 14-15, 2016
Cleveland, OH
The Sunlight Foundation chose Cleveland for this year's unconference in order to tap into the local expertise of an area with strong grassroots organisers and clear problems the community is trying to solve. The event aims to bring together librarians, government officials, technologists, civic leaders, community organisers, and others to figure out strategies and solutions for making local and state governance better, faster, smarter and more transparent.
http://bit.ly/2aP6RaV

Freedom not Fear
----------------------------------------
October 14-17, 2016
Brussels, Belgium
At Freedom not Fear, civil society members meet to plan for and engage in action against increasing surveillance and other attacks on civil rights. The meeting, intended for civil rights and freedom activists from across Europe, is organised by volutneers and coordinated by EDRi member Digitalcourage and via the akv-international mailing list.
http://bit.ly/2cmKWrM

Privacy+Security Forum
----------------------------------------
October 24-26, 2016
Washington, DC
Monday, October 24, is devoted to pre-conference workshops and "intensive days" - advanced discussion focused narrowly on a particular topic or industry. Proposals are welcome until April 30, 2016 based on the following guiding principles: bridge the silos between privacy and security; cover issues with depth and rigour; employ interaction, scenario-based learning, and extensive engagement; deliver practical takeaways from each session.
http://bit.ly/1RIzYhV

ODI Summit
----------------------------------------
November 1, 2016
London, UK
The annual Open Data Institute Summit will feature inspiring stories from around the world on how people are innovating with the web of data, and presentations from diverse innovators, from current startup founders to experienced, high-profile speakers such as World Wide Web inventor Tim Berners-Lee, AI expert Nigel Shadbolt and Lastminute.com founder Martha Lane Fox.
http://bit.ly/2ar2aXf

ICANN 57
----------------------------------------
November 3-9, 2016
Hyderabad, India
ICANN meetings provide a venue for progressing policy work, conducting outreach, exchanging best practices, conducting business deals, interacting among members of the ICANN Community, including board and staff, and learning about ICANN.
http://bit.ly/29CmNg9

Mozilla Festival
----------------------------------------
November 6-8, 2016
London, UK
MozFest is an annual celebration of the open Web. Participants are diverse, including engineers, artists, activists, and educators, but share the common belief that the Web can make lives better, unlocks opportunity, spurs creativity, teaches valuable skills, and connects far-flung people and ideas. The Festival seeks to improve the Web with new ideas and creations.
http://bit.ly/1WmxRQ0

OpenCon
----------------------------------------
November 12-14, 2016
Washington, DC
At this event, the next generation can learn about Open Access, Open Education, and Open Data, develop critical skills, and catalyse action toward a more open system of research and education. OpenCon will convene students and early career academic professionals, both in person and through satellite events around the world and serve as a powerful catalyst for projects led by the next generation to advance OpenCon's three focus areas.
http://bit.ly/1OocSMD

WIPO Standing Committee on Copyright and Related Rights
----------------------------------------
November 14-16, 2016
Geneva, Switzerland
Topics at the 33rd meeting of SCCR will include the protection of broadcasting organisations, exceptions and limitations for libraries and archives, limitations and exceptions for educational and research institutions and for persons with disabilities, and proposals for analysing copyright with respect to the digital environment and to include the resale right in future work.
http://bit.ly/2bi2lF9

Internet Governance Forum
----------------------------------------
December 6-9, 2016 (TBC)
Guadalajara, Mexico
With the UN's renewal in December 2015, the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) consolidates itself as a platform to bring people together from various stakeholder groups as equals, in discussions on public policy issues relating to the Internet. While there is no negotiated outcome, the IGF informs and inspires those with policy-making power in both the public and private sectors. At their annual meeting delegates discuss, exchange information and share good practices with each other.
http://bit.ly/28YwZPX

Open Government Partnership Summit
----------------------------------------
December 7-9, 2016
Paris, France
Representatives from governments, academia, civil society and international organizations will gather to share their experiences and best practices and push forward the open government global agenda in light of the great challenges of the modern world. As a forum for sharing best practices, OGP provides a unique platform that brings together, stimulates and expands the community of state reformers worldwide.
http://bit.ly/2b1IY0Q

Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection
----------------------------------------
January 25-27, 2017
Brussels, Belgium
The tenth CPDP's main theme is artificial intelligence. The conference is accepting proposals for panels in April (from academic consortia, research projects, think tanks, and other research organisations) and May (from individuals wishing to present academic research papers).
http://bit.ly/1OrQSv6

Internet Freedom Festival
----------------------------------------
March 6-10, 2017
Valencia, Spain
The Internet Freedom Festival gathers the community keeping the Internet open and uncensored for a week of free-form multidisciplinary collaboration intended to help groups achieve their goals. Attendance is free and open to the public.
internetfreedomfestival.org

Rightscon 2017
----------------------------------------
March 29-31, 2017
Brussels, Belgium
RightsCon will tackle the most pressing issues at the intersection of technology and human rights. Session proposals are being accepted until November 25, 2016.
http://bit.ly/I2ZAUZ

Creative Commons Global Summit
----------------------------------------
April 28-30, 2017
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
This event will gather a global community of technologists, academics, activists, creatives, and legal experts to work together on the expansion and growth of the commons, open knowledge, and free culture for all.
http://bit.ly/2cO3x0P

Open Repositories 2017
----------------------------------------
June 26-30, 2017
Brisbane, Australia
The annual Open Repositories Conference brings together users and developers of open digital repository platforms from higher education, government, galleries, libraries, archives and museums. The Conference provides an interactive forum for delegates from around the world to come together and explore the global challenges and opportunities facing libraries and the broader scholarly information landscape.
http://bit.ly/2aOCiGp


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Research Digest • Open Society Information Program • 10 September 2016 

=================================================

The Open Society Information Program Research Digest tracks new scholarly articles and books on the social and political aspects of information and technology issues. The Digest is compiled by Evgeny Morozov. A related Twitter feed is also available at https://twitter.com/#!/morozov_links.

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the Open Society Foundations or the Information Program.



NEW ARTICLES AND PAPERS
==========================

* "UnMarginalizing Workers: How Big Data Drives Lower Wages and How Reframing Labor Law Can Restore Information Equality in the Workplace" by Nathan Newman - working paper

This article details the ways big data is actively being deployed to lower wages through hiring practices, in how raises are now being offered, and in the ways that workplaces are organized (and disorganized) to lower employee bargaining power --- and how new interpretations of labor law are beginning to reshape the workplace to address these economic harms.

source: http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2819142 (free)

-------

* "The Rise of Behavioural Discrimination" by Ariel Ezrachi & Maurice E. Stucke - working paper

The author surveys the political and social effects of the increased personalization of our online environment, as firms track us, collect data about us, and target us with the right ad at the right time -- all to transform our web environment into a personal space. This new personalized environment can pave the way for behavioural discrimination -- the ability of sellers to induce us to buy things we otherwise wouldn't, at the highest price we are willing to pay.

source: http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2830206 (free)

-------

* "Crowdsourced Surveillance And Networked Data" by Nick Lally - Securing Dialogue

Possibilities for crowdsourced surveillance have expanded in recent years as data uploaded to social networks can be mined, distributed, assembled, mapped, and analyzed by anyone with an uncensored internet connection. These data points, argues the author, are necessarily fragmented and partial, open to interpretation, and rely on algorithms for retrieval and sorting. Yet despite these limitations, they have been used to produce complex representations of space, subjects, and power relations as internet users attempt to reconstruct and investigate events while they are developing.

source: http://sdi.sagepub.com/content/early/2016/09/03/0967010616664459 ($)

-------

* "Algorithms and Their Others: Algorithmic Culture in Context" by Paul Dourish - Big Data & Society

Algorithms, once obscure objects of technical art, have lately been subject to considerable popular and scholarly scrutiny. What does it mean to adopt the algorithm as an object of analytic attention? What is in view, and out of view, when we focus on the algorithm? Using Niklaus Wirth's 1975 formulation that "algorithms + data structures = programs" as a launching-off point, this paper examines how an algorithmic lens shapes the way in which we might inquire into contemporary digital culture.

source: http://bds.sagepub.com/content/3/2/2053951716665128 ($)

-------

* "The Politics of Cryptocurrencies in Historical Perspective" by Stefan Eich - working paper

While cryptocurrencies are frequently framed as an escape from politics, this paper argues that this is misleading on several counts. Electronic currencies, argues the author, cannot leave the politics of money behind even where they aim to disavow it. Examining the international politics of money that emerged out the 1970s, the author discusses the emergence of a technocratic regime of depoliticized fiat currencies and domestic discipline complemented by cheap global credit money. Today, demands for depoliticization and politicization compete once more with one another.

source: https://www.academia.edu/27672693/The_Politics_of_Cryptocurrencies_in_Historical_Perspective ($)


NEW AND NOTEWORTHY BOOKS
==========================

* "Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy" by Cathy O'Neil (Crown)

This book exposes the black box models that shape our future, both as individuals and as a society. These "weapons of math destruction," as the authors dubs them, score teachers and students, sort résumés, grant (or deny) loans, evaluate workers, target voters, set parole, and monitor our health. The author calls on modellers to take more responsibility for their algorithms and on policy makers to regulate their use.

source: https://www.amazon.com/Weapons-Math-Destruction-Increases-Inequality/dp/0553418815/

-------

* "The Ethics of Invention: Technology and the Human Future" by Sheila Jasanoff (Norton)

In her new book, written for the general audience, Sheila Jasanoff argues that technology rules us as much as laws do. It shapes the legal, social, and ethical environments in which we act. The author dissects the ways in which we delegate power to technological systems and asks how we might regain control. Technology, she argues, can warp the meaning of democracy and citizenship unless we carefully consider how to direct its power rather than let ourselves be shaped by it.

source: https://www.amazon.com/Ethics-Invention-Technology-Human-Future/dp/039307899X

-------

* "Utopia Is Creepy: And Other Provocations" by Nicholas Carr (Norton)

In his latest collection of essays, Nicholas Carr dissects Silicon Valley's unsettlingly cheery vision of the technological future to ask a hard question: Have we been seduced by a lie? The book offers an alternative history of the digital age, chronicling its roller-coaster crazes and crashes, its blind triumphs, and its unintended consequences. Carr offers searching assessments of the future of work, the fate of reading, and the rise of artificial intelligence.

source: https://www.amazon.com/Utopia-Creepy-Provocations-Nicholas-Carr/dp/0393254542/

-------

* "Licensed Larceny: Infrastructure, Financial Extraction and the Global South" by Nicholas Hildyard (Manchester University Press)

The author contends that the provision of public services is one area which is increasingly being reconfigured to extract wealth upward to the 1%, notably through so-called Public Private Partnerships (PPPs). The push for PPPs, argues the author, is not about building infrastructure for the benefit of society but about constructing new subsidies that benefit the already wealthy. In other words, it is less about financing development than developing finance.

source: https://www.amazon.com/Licensed-larceny-Infrastructure-extraction-Manchester/dp/1784994278

-------

* "Algorithms to Live By: The Computer Science of Human Decisions" by Brian Christian & Tom Griffiths (Henry Holt)

This book offers an exploration of how computer algorithms can be applied to our everyday lives, helping to solve common decision-making problems and illuminate the workings of the human mind. The authors show how the simple, precise algorithms used by computers can also untangle very human questions. They explain how to have better hunches and when to leave things to chance, how to deal with overwhelming choices and how best to connect with others.

source: https://www.amazon.com/Algorithms-Live-Computer-Science-Decisions-ebook/dp/B015CKNWJI/




Hear more from the Information Program!

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License (CC BY 4.0)

The Guardian ran this a few weeks ago. This is the pre-edited version here, as it includes a few details that were cut, presumably for space (since I have more space, I've also restored a few things). The photo was taken by Boyce Keay.

The Richmond Local History Society has much more to read about David, and also has links to some of his talks and historical writing.

DGB 02.jpeg

The first time I saw David Blomfield, who has died aged 82, he was on a tennis court hitting an almost unreturnable, vicious, sliced, slapped forehand. That was the least of his talents, and the least characteristic of a man widely known for his gentleness and kindness. In the area surrounding Kew Gardens, where he lived for over 50 years, Blomfield was a self-effacing hero: a highly-skilled book editor, local historian, LibDem councillor, church warden, magistrate, school governor, chair of numerous organisations including ten years at the Richmond Local History Society, and occasional assistant at the Kew Bookshop, where, with his inseparable wife, Caroline, he was a partner. If you didn't know David you haven't lived in Kew, only resided here.

"Everyone wanted David on board," the former MP Jenny Tonge observed at his packed memorial service.

An army officer's son, after his schooling (where achieving a cricket century at 12 remained ever after his proudest achievement) he did national service with the Royal Artillery and ten years in Oxfordshire Yeomanry, writing their history in 2015. He read Classics at Oxford and in 1959 joined Reader's Digest's Condensed Books department. There, he viewed condensed books as a way to spread books to many they otherwise would not reach. In the following 28 years, he headed the department, edited, among many other titles, The Reader's Bible, and ran a presciently early investigation of electronic publishing.

Elected a local councillor in 1971, he briefly lost his seat in 1978 because he championed the unpopular creation of a bail hostel in Kew, arguing that the residents of such a privileged area should not exclude others. He won the seat back in a by-election in 1979, eventually standing down in 1986.

After leaving the Digest in 1987, he worked as a freelance book editor, ghost-wrote biographies including that of David Penhaligon, and wrote extensively about local history. His 2007 PhD thesis studied the boatmen along Upper Tidal Thames. His final public talk, in April, told the story of Richmond's Star and Garter home for servicemen disabled in World War I (https://soundcloud.com/richmond-history-society).

A life-long church-goer, David chaired the committee that converted Kew's Barn Chuch into a constantly-used, shared local centre. He was neither exclusive nor evangelical, and his public life was driven by his belief in the importance of community. Kew is the better for it, and in 2000, he was awarded the MBE for his services to the Richmond area.

He is survived by his wife, Caroline, three children, James, Melanie, and Rupert, and six grandchildren.


News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week of 26 August 2016
====================================================

The Information Program News Digest, published the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF. Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

Our staff, advisers and major grantees tweet at http://bit.ly/13j5fjq. Current and former grantees featured in this issue: Citizen Lab, EFF, EIFL.


NEWS
=====
For breaking news stories, visit: http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:news/

US: Equation Group claims NSA hack
----------------------------------------------------------------------
At Wired, Andy Greenberg reports that a group calling itself the Shadow Brokers has claimed to have breached the data systems used by the Equation Group, a highly sophisticated team of "cyberspies" that Edward Snowden's revelations have linked to the NSA. Shadow Brokers posted the stolen data for auction on a since-removed Tumblr page. Citizen Lab''s Claudio Guanieri, assessing the data, says that the posted content is credible enough, but that there's not enough evidence to link the hack to Equation Group or any other NSA-linked organization. The New York Times considers who the hackers might have been. Policy analyst Marcy Wheeler says that the hack bears out the claim that the NSA exploits vulnerabilities in commercial products, and suggests questions the US Congress should be asking in order to fulfil its role of oversight. EFF has published proposals for reforming the way the US government acquires and exploits vulnerabilities.
Wired: http://bit.ly/2bfkDI5
Citizen Lab: http://bit.ly/2bgkhhM
NY Times: http://nyti.ms/2bi25Wr
Wheeler: http://bit.ly/2bw0uv8
EFF: http://bit.ly/2bVx6Qd

Pakistan passes Prevention of Electronic Crimes Act
----------------------------------------------------------------------
EFF reports that despite 18 months of opposition from numerous civil society organisations and concerned politicians, Pakistan has passed the Prevention of Electronic Crimes Act, which EFF's Danny O'Brien calls "a tragedy for free expression and privacy". The crimes the new law creates of "cyber-terrorism" and online "glorification" are broad, as are the government's new powers to threaten and intimidate speech and collect and share data without warrant or oversight, including with foreign intelligence. The bill claims jurisdiction over all Pakistani citizens, whatever their location, plus anyone in the world whose online activity affects any Pakistani national. Ars Technica reports that day after the law's passage the opposition party Pakistan Awami Tehreek filed a constitutional challenge on the basis that multiple sections violate fundamental human rights.
EFF: http://bit.ly/2bi5j7C
Ars Technica: http://bit.ly/2bOZWzG

US Government approves IANA transition
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Intellectual Property Watch reports that the US National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) has confirmed that in October it will hand off technical oversight of the internet's domain name system to the Internet Corporation of Assigned Names and Numbers "barring any significant impediment". A few points remain to be completed before the current contract expires on October 1: ICANN must approve a new contract with VeriSign, which maintains the root zone, and three intellectual property issues. ICANN has published a call for comments on the latter.
IP Watch: http://bit.ly/2bETY4I
IANA: http://bit.ly/2bNqWxY

Uber, Ford hasten self-driving fleet
----------------------------------------------------------------------
ComputerWorld reports that the Ford Motor Company has announced it will mass-produce fully autonomous vehicles designed for car-sharing services such as Uber and Lyft by 2021. Ford says the cars will have neither steering wheels nor pedals. Bloomberg reports that Uber will begin a test of 100 self-driving cars in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania later this month. These cars will be modified Volvo XC90 SUVs, and humans will be present in the driver's seats at all times; cars will be paired randomly with customers. The test will proceed despite the recent crash of an automated Tesla. In July, Uber bought Otto, a driverless truck start-up. Mina discusses the likely resulting loss of jobs for human drivers and self-destruction of the automotive industry.
Computer World: http://bit.ly/2bw1G1G
Bloomberg: http://bloom.bg/2bNALwy
MINA: http://bit.ly/2bw1LCw

Australia realigns latitude and longitude
----------------------------------------------------------------------
ABC reports that Australia will adjust longitudes and latitudes across the continent. According to Geoscience Australia, due to normal tectonic motion the continent moves northward at a rate of about 7cm per year, but the Geocentric Datum of Australia, which pins coordinates to geography, was last updated in 1994. As a result the coordinates are approximately 1 metre out of alignment with satellite navigation systems, a problem that affects myriad spatial information service and will worsen as GPS resolution continues to improve. Accurate data will be curcial for automated farm vehicles and cars as they come into use. The new Datum will be released on January 1, 2017 and will be based on projections to 2020.
ABC: http://ab.co/2bP0XaK

Thailand to track foreigners via SIM cards
----------------------------------------------------------------------
CNBC reports that beginning in January 2017 foreigners will be required to use special SIM cards in their phones that can be tracked by the authorities. Users will be unable to turn off the tracking function, which will be preset by mobile operators. The Thai telecom regulator, the National Broadcasting and Telecommunications Commission, has approved the plan in principle as an anti-crime measure. The proposal is seen as an extension to measures intended to curb both crime and overstaying visas, though critics believe it will add little of value.
CNBC: http://cnb.cx/2bguzvj


FEATURES AND ANALYSIS
====================
For more features and analysis selected by the Program team, visit:
http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:oped/

Can this election be hacked?
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The run-up to the November US election, coupled with the recent hack of the Democratic National Committee, has sparked concerns about the possibility that the election could be hacked. In two blog postings at Freedom to Tinker, Andrew Appel outlines what aspects can and cannot be hacked, and discusses the best way to mount defences. The ability to audit the vote, he explains, is crucial. In a new report, EPIC expresses concerns about the risk to voter secrecy (a US requirement) if the push to adopt online voting in some states, primarily to aid overseas and military voters, is successful. EPIC makes recommendations for preserving privacy while adopting new technologies.
Freedom to Tinker (1): http://bit.ly/2bNABVS
Freedom to Tinker (2): http://bit.ly/2bzRdj7
EPIC: http://bit.ly/2bFS5FY

Predictive policing predicts police harassment
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article at The Verge, Matt Stroud discusses a new RAND Corporation report, which has found that the algorithm-generated "heat list", the latest of Chicago's many efforts to reduce its homicide rate, has failed to save any lives. The heat list, generated by a $2 million algorithm funded by the National Institute of Justice, is intended to identify the people most likely to be involved in a shooting. RAND's analysis finds instead that at best it is less effective than traditional Most Wanted lists, and at worst the profiles it creates make their subjects targets for police harassment.
Verge: http://bit.ly/2bP0dCD
RAND report (Springer): http://bit.ly/2bBDHzS

How Facebook targets ads
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this analysis, the Washington Post discusses Facebook's latest bit of transparency, which lists 98 data points the site uses to target personalised ads, both on Facebook and around the web.
Washington Post: http://wapo.st/2bgulV7

Death and the digital estate
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this Engine Room blog posting, Zara Rahman discusses the problem of "digital death" - both what happens to individuals' data and sites after their death and what happens to data and communities gathered by projects that are ending. Several scholarly legal analyses of digital estates have been published by Strathclyde PhD student Edina Harbinja and professor Lilien Edwards. These discuss the different types of digital estates, and ask whether we need legal standing for "post mortem privacy"; they also propose some solutions to the legal issues they raise.
Engine Room: http://bit.ly/2bBCPuW
Harbinja/Edwards (SSRN): http://bit.ly/2bFSA2J

Poland: Libraries and copyright changes
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this webinar (video and slides), EIFL copyright coordinator Barbara Szczepańska explains the provisions of Poland's new copyright law that affect libraries, schools, and archives. Changes include a broad new exception for preservation, implementation of the EU's Orphan Works Directive (for which Poland has mandated a long list of sources prospective users must diligently search), and provisions for the use of works that have fallen out of commercial availability.
YouTube: http://bit.ly/2bi6RhO


***

DIARY
==============
To see more events recommended by the Information Program team, visit:
https://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:events/. If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

The Use And Generation Of Scientific Content - Roles For Libraries
---------------------#-------------------
September 12, 2016
Budapest, Hungary
This one-day seminar will focus on how scientific content is used and the advanced role of libraries in making the best of it. The seminar will try to cover aspects of how libraries can improve the use of their content and how libraries can generate content from their side; the role of libraries in producing further content (that is, Open Access University Presses); and libraries' contributions to the development of Open Access.
http://bit.ly/2aVUyvd

Outcomes and Return on Investment of Academic Libraries in a Changing Digital Landscape
---------------------#-------------------
September 15, 2016
Ljubljana, Slovenia
This one-day seminar will approach two critical topics: managing electronic resources during the transition to open access; and economic aspects of using information resources and publishing in new circumstances. This seminar will try to discover return on investment beyond quantifiable value in the form of complex possible outcomes that cannot be directly measured using quantitative indicators, but must be assessed via the long-term quality assessment of their influence on study and research work output.
http://bit.ly/2aP8jtM

IFLA World Library and Information Congress
---------------------#-------------------
August 13-19, 2016
Columbus, OH
The theme of the 82nd IFLA Congress is "Connections. Collaboration. Community." The Congress will feature programmes from myriad library sectors.
http://bit.ly/2a79a8p

8th Conference on Open Access Scholarly Publishing
----------------------------------------
September 21-22, 2016
Arlington, VA
COASP's eighth edition will feature a diverse range of panels, events, and collaborative opportunities to bring together the open access community. With open access now at the top of the agendas of global governments, universities, libraries, funders, and policy makers, and of critical importance to researchers at all stages of their careers, COASP offers a crucial space for those working in open access around the world to come together and discuss developments, innovations, and best practices, and to make and build upon collaborations old and new.
http://bit.ly/OhXCyu

Chinese Institutional Repository Conference
----------------------------------------
ChongQing City, China
September 21-22, 2016
Hosted by the National Science Library, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and the Library of ChongQing University, the fourth Chinese IR Conference will feature EIFL open access programme manager Iryna Kuchma, who will speak about global open access repository developments and trends.
http://bit.ly/2afoULf

State of the Map
----------------------------------------
September 23-26, 2016
Brussels, Belgium
Talks, discussions and workshops, code and documentation sprints, all to improve the collaborative OpenStreetMap project.
http://bit.ly/28Z6Hxl

The Open Exchange for Social Change
----------------------------------------
October 4, 2016
Madrid, Spain
This pre-IOCD unconference aims to create a space where participants can exchange knowledge and understanding and build solidarity that will lead to better outcomes for IODC and beyond. It is an open space so that attendees can propose the most relevant and urgent topics for their work.
http://bit.ly/2aEpFg1

International Open Data Conference
----------------------------------------
October 6-7
Madrid, Spain
At IODC16, governments, civil society, multilateral organisations, and private companies will gather around a roadmap. the International Open Data Charter, in order to keep improving the governability, citizen engagement, innovation, and international development of open data initiatives.
http://bit.ly/1HQuPNW

Transparency Camp 2016

October 14-15, 2016
Cleveland, OH
The Sunlight Foundation chose Cleveland for this year's unconference in order to tap into the local expertise of an area with strong grassroots organisers and clear problems the community is trying to solve. The event aims to bring together librarians, government officials, technologists, civic leaders, community organisers, and others to figure out strategies and solutions for making local and state governance better, faster, smarter and more transparent.
http://bit.ly/2aP6RaV

Privacy+Security Forum
----------------------------------------
October 24-26, 2016
Washington, DC
Monday, October 24, is devoted to pre-conference workshops and "intensive days" - advanced discussion focused narrowly on a particular topic or industry. Proposals are welcome until April 30, 2016 based on the following guiding principles: bridge the silos between privacy and security; cover issues with depth and rigour; employ interaction, scenario-based learning, and extensive engagement; deliver practical takeaways from each session.
http://bit.ly/1RIzYhV

ODI Summit
----------------------------------------
November 1, 2016
London, UK
The annual Open Data Institute Summit will feature inspiring stories from around the world on how people are innovating with the web of data, and presentations from diverse innovators, from current startup founders to experienced, high-profile speakers such as World Wide Web inventor Tim Berners-Lee, AI expert Nigel Shadbolt and Lastminute.com founder Martha Lane Fox.
http://bit.ly/2ar2aXf

ICANN 57
----------------------------------------
November 3-9, 2016
Hyderabad, India
ICANN meetings provide a venue for progressing policy work, conducting outreach, exchanging best practices, conducting business deals, interacting among members of the ICANN Community, including board and staff, and learning about ICANN.
http://bit.ly/29CmNg9

Mozilla Festival
----------------------------------------
November 6-8, 2016
London, UK
MozFest is an annual celebration of the open Web. Participants are diverse, including engineers, artists, activists, and educators, but share the common belief that the Web can make lives better, unlocks opportunity, spurs creativity, teaches valuable skills, and connects far-flung people and ideas. The Festival seeks to improve the Web with new ideas and creations.
http://bit.ly/1WmxRQ0

OpenCon
----------------------------------------
November 12-14, 2016
Washington, DC
At this event, the next generation can learn about Open Access, Open Education, and Open Data, develop critical skills, and catalyse action toward a more open system of research and education. OpenCon will convene students and early career academic professionals, both in person and through satellite events around the world and serve as a powerful catalyst for projects led by the next generation to advance OpenCon's three focus areas.
http://bit.ly/1OocSMD

WIPO Standing Committee on Copyright and Related Rights
----------------------------------------
November 14-16, 2016
Geneva, Switzerland
Topics at the 33rd meeting of SCCR will include the protection of broadcasting organisations, exceptions and limitations for libraries and archives, limitations and exceptions for educational and research institutions and for persons with disabilities, and proposals for analysing copyright with respect to the digital environment and to include the resale right in future work.
http://bit.ly/2bi2lF9

Internet Governance Forum
----------------------------------------
December 6-9, 2016 (TBC)
Guadalajara, Mexico
With the UN's renewal in December 2015, the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) consolidates itself as a platform to bring people together from various stakeholder groups as equals, in discussions on public policy issues relating to the Internet. While there is no negotiated outcome, the IGF informs and inspires those with policy-making power in both the public and private sectors. At their annual meeting delegates discuss, exchange information and share good practices with each other.
http://bit.ly/28YwZPX

Open Government Partnership Summit
----------------------------------------
December 7-9, 2016
Paris, France
Representatives from governments, academia, civil society and international organizations will gather to share their experiences and best practices and push forward the open government global agenda in light of the great challenges of the modern world. As a forum for sharing best practices, OGP provides a unique platform that brings together, stimulates and expands the community of state reformers worldwide.
http://bit.ly/2b1IY0Q

Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection
----------------------------------------
January 25-27, 2017
Brussels, Belgium
The tenth CPDP's main theme is artificial intelligence. The conference is accepting proposals for panels in April (from academic consortia, research projects, think tanks, and other research organisations) and May (from individuals wishing to present academic research papers).
http://bit.ly/1OrQSv6

Rightscon 2017
----------------------------------------
March 29-31, 2017
Brussels, Belgium
RightsCon will tackle the most pressing issues at the intersection of technology and human rights.
http://bit.ly/I2ZAUZ

Open Repositories 2017
----------------------------------------
June 26-30, 2017
Brisbane, Australia
The annual Open Repositories Conference brings together users and developers of open digital repository platforms from higher education, government, galleries, libraries, archives and museums. The Conference provides an interactive forum for delegates from around the world to come together and explore the global challenges and opportunities facing libraries and the broader scholarly information landscape.
http://bit.ly/2aOCiGp


***

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News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week of 12 August 2016
====================================================

The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF. Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

Our staff, advisers and major grantees tweet at http://bit.ly/13j5fjq. Current and former grantees featured in this issue: Citizen Lab, EDRi, EFF, Privacy International, La Quadrature du Net.


NEWS
=====
For breaking news stories, visit: http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:news/

The Wall Street Journal reports that Procter and Gamble is to scale back its targeted Facebook ads, believing that it has taken the narrow marketing approach too far. However, the company will maintain its level of spending on Facebook, cutting back instead on ads on smaller sites that don't have a similar reach. The largest brands benefit more from a broader approach.
WSJ: http://on.wsj.com/2aZGvln

Brazil: Supreme Court refuses algorithmic transparency
----------------------------------------------------------------------
While the Daily Dot warns that visitors to Rio have probably already been hacked via one of myriad spoofed wifi networks and other techniques, Jota reports that the Brazilian Supreme Court has denied a recent citizen's request for access to the source code for the algorithm that allocates cases to rapporteurs, who typically make autonomous decisions. Because randomness is a crucial element in assuring fairness, Jota argues that the Supreme Court should make the algorithm public to provide transparency into how it works so that citizens can be satisfied it's not being manipulated, either as a gesture of goodwill or to comply with the Access to Information Act.
Daily Dot: http://bit.ly/2aZGCxD
Jota (Portuguese): http://bit.ly/2aMJKvP
Google Translate: http://bit.ly/2bk8Jep

Malaysia: New law gives government sweeping powers
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Human Rights Watch calls for the immediate repeal of Malaysia's new National Security Council Act, which came into force on August 1 and gives the government the power to declare any or all regions of the country as security areas where police may conduct arrests, searches, and seizures without warrants, limit freedom of movement, ban demonstrations, and impose comprehensive security requirements. Such declarations last six months, but are infinitely renewable.
HRW: http://bit.ly/2aP4k0G

Peru installs off-the-shelf national surveillance
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The Associated Press reports that despite protests last year the Peruvian government went ahead with a $22 million purchase of off-the-shelf surveillance software made by an Israel-based subsidiary of Verint Systems Ltd that allows it to intercept voice calls, text messages and emails. Documents obtained by the AP show how easy it is for countries to use this unregulated market to violate basic rights using the same tools that are sold to Western police and spy agencies for "lawful interception". Privacy International's latest work, a report on the global surveillance industry and the accompanying searchable global surveillance industry index, maps modern surveillance technologies, their trade, the companies that manufacture and export them, and the regulation governing the trade. PI developed its information from investigative reporting, whistleblowers, and government transparency reports.
AP (Washington Post): http://wapo.st/2aZH3YD
PI (report): http://bit.ly/2b8vfDX
PI (index): http://bit.ly/2biKFXs

Open access provides citation advantage
----------------------------------------------------------------------
1Science reports that new research finds that open access papers have a 50% citation advantage over papers published in subscription-based journals. At her website, US presidential candidate Hillary Clinton has published a tech and innovation agenda that includes open licensing for publicly-funded research. Meanwhile, Inside Higher Ed reports calls for a boycott of SSRN, which was sold to Elsevier in May. SSRN is under fire because some papers were removed from the database, which Elsevier has explained was a mistake, not a change of policy.
1Science: http://bit.ly/2bkaDf9
Clinton: http://hrc.io/2bkfC0Q
Inside Higher Ed: http://bit.ly/2aJWdR0

American Association of Publishers objects to Sci-Hub research
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Inside Higher Ed reports that the American Association of Publishers has complained that in a presentation he posted, Gabriel J. Gardner, a librarian at California State University at Long Beach, praised Sci-Hub's ease of use. The presentation outlined his research studying the popularity among academics of sharing papers despite violating copyright. In defending Gardner, Roman Kochan, dean of library services at Cal State in return challenged publishers to do more to make journal subscriptions affordable. At the Chronicle of Higher Education, George Mason University cultural studies professor Hugh Gusterson suggests that academics should recognise that journal publishing has become commodified, changing the traditional ecosystem surrounding academic research, and therefore should cease working for free to enrich large, corporate publishers.
Inside Higher Ed: http://bit.ly/2bkfPBa
Chronicle: http://bit.ly/2b96n1s

How foreign governments spy using Power Point and Twitter
----------------------------------------------------------------
At the Washington Post, Citizen Lab director Ron Deibert reveals a cyberespionage campaign operating out of Iran which uses familiar tools like PowerPoint and Twitter to spy on and hack activists. In a newly published report, the Lab discusses this latest addition to a long history of previous digital attacks against civil society, including monitoring and infiltration of human rights groups and journalists using sophisticated spyware (Ethiopia and Sudan), a malware campaign targeted at journalists, activists, and political opposition groups (Latin America), and numerous others. Activists need to work together to make each other safe, and will need help from stakeholders such as funders.
Washington Post: http://wapo.st/2b8x9Ex
Citizen Lab: http://bit.ly/2baVoGl

International Olympic Committee bans all unauthorised moving images
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The Guardian reports that the International Olympic Committee has banned news media from publishing any animated images relating to the Rio Games, including animated GIFs and Vines. Under its "Rule 40", the IOC also bans any commercial organisations that are not sponsors from using any of numerous terms on social media during the Games. The Financial Review explains the IOC sees this as "ambush marketing", and notes the list of terms includes: "summer", "gold", "games", "effort", "victory", "Rio" and "2016". The Drum reports that the IOC relaxed Rule 40 this year, eliminating the blackout period before and during the Games during which non-sponsors were not allowed to mention athletes' names. The Drum also notes that Twitter has suspended the fake @Official_Rule40 account, a bot which automatically chided anyone using the barred terms, most notably the Pope and Donald Trump. At New Republic Dev Saif Gangjee discusses in detail the dubious legal basis on which the IOC stakes its claims.
Guardian: http://bit.ly/2bke5aR
Financial Review: http://bit.ly/2blC6KK
The Drum: http://bit.ly/2b1HRhE
New Republic: http://bit.ly/2aOAH3s


FEATURES AND ANALYSIS
====================
For more features and analysis selected by the Program team, visit:
http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:oped/

Truth in civic tech
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting at Civicist, based on a panel at the recent Personal Democracy Forum, digital strategist Jed Miller discusses the unreasonable expectations common to the technology world and the problem they pose for civic tech in particular. Simplistic expectations, he argues, distorts the incentives for both advocates and donors; it is better to be realistic and understand that learning may look like failure and yet be valuable. Among the panelists whose comments he discusses are OSF's Elizabeth Eagen, Nike Foundation's Shaifali Puri, and Product Team's Sam Dorman.
Civicist: http://bit.ly/2bkb1Ky

India, EU consider network neutrality
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this posting, EDRi discusses the more than 500,000 responses the EU's Body of European Regulators of Electronic Communications (BEREC) has received to the network neutrality consultation. Telecom companies are pushing to delete paragraphs regarding free speech. BEREC must publish new rules by August 30. Also, in a blog posting at the Center for Democracy and Technology, CDT Open Internet Fellow Stan Adams discusses the pre-consultation on network neutrality recently launched by the Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) and its background. How India answers the important questions it's asking, Adams writes, matters to all of us because of its size and growing influence: with only 35% of its population connected, India's internet users make up 13.5% of the online population.
EDRi: http://bit.ly/2biMGmy
CDT: http://bit.ly/2b95uWM

UK and EU: Heading for data divorce?
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting at Freedom to Tinker, Axel Arnbak, author of the recent book Securing Private Communications, discusses the widening gap between the UK and the rest of Europe around data privacy. Since 1990, he writes, the UK has repeatedly obstructed policies desired by the EU, such as requiring telecommunications providers to implement end-to-end encryption, and the General Data Protection Regulation and Directive, and the e-Privacy directive. Arnbak believes, therefore, that Britain's exit from the EU may smooth future efforts to legislate for privacy and freedom. An open question, however, is how and whether data transfers between the departed UK and the EU can be made legal. At the Amberhawk blog, Chris Pounder analyses the future of data protection law in a UK outside the EU with no obligation to implement GDPR and concludes that as long as the UK remains a member of the Council of Europe it will be forced to implement the GDPR and UK-based data controllers will have no choice but to comply.
Freedom to Tinker: http://bit.ly/2aZJ9rx
Amberhawk: http://bit.ly/2b8xEhK

Drones and the future of aviation
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this video of the one-day workshop Drones and the Future of Aviation, held at the White House, a group of industry, government, and research experts on aviation assembled to discuss the near future of unmanned aircraft systems. The Federal Aviation Administration has announced it will approve the operation of drones over people before the end of the year. The workshop included keynotes by US Chief Technology Officer Megan Smith, FAA Administrator Michael Huerta, and Intel CEO Bryan Krzanich, as well as panels discussing issues such as safety, data collection, and privacy. In Hungary, Atlatszo.hu has been able to use drone footage to improve government transparency by uncovering politicians' hidden assets, capturing aerial footage of protests against the government's internet tax, and showing the true plight of refugees in transit, whom the government sought to characterise as dangerous enemies.
White House: http://bit.ly/2bkfFcI
OSF: https://osf.to/2aOAOMx

EFF at the eleventh HOPE
----------------------------------------------------------------------
On this page, EFF publishes links to video and slides from the talks EFFers gave at the 11th Hackers on the Planet Earth conference (HOPE), held in New York in July. Included are Cory Doctorow's keynote, in which he discusses "Turing-completeness denial", a refusal to understand that computers have limits that underlies many problems in digital rights, including digital rights management, the loss of data privacy, and restrictions on encryption. Like other forms of denial, this one inflicts consequential damages on millions of people who act in good faith. Also linked are a summary of the year in digital liberties, progress on the Let's Encrypt initiative and an outline of Privacy Badger and Panopticlick, tools EFF provides to help web browsers defeat trackers.
EFF: http://bit.ly/2blBKDV


***

DIARY
==============
To see more events recommended by the Information Program team, visit:
https://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:events/. If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

21st-Century Literacies for Public Libraries
----------------------------------------
August 10-11, 2016
Philadelphia, PA
At this two-day satellite meeting, presented by IFLA's Public Libraries Section, delegates will share and learn from each other's experiences in developing and delivering services that encompass today's expanded concept of literacy, which includes not only the traditional ability to read and write but proficiency in a range of other literacies such as civic, health, financial, digital, and information.
http://bit.ly/1PZhExo

The Use And Generation Of Scientific Content - Roles For Libraries
---------------------#-------------------
September 12, 2016
Budapest, Hungary
This one-day seminar will focus on how scientific content is used and the advanced role of libraries in making the best of it. The seminar will try to cover aspects of how libraries can improve the use of their content and how libraries can generate content from their side; the role of libraries in producing further content (that is, Open Access University Presses); and libraries' contributions to the development of Open Access.
http://bit.ly/2aVUyvd

Outcomes and Return on Investment of Academic Libraries in a Changing Digital Landscape
---------------------#-------------------
September 15, 2016
Ljubljana, Slovenia
This one-day seminar will approach two critical topics: managing electronic resources during the transition to open access; and economic aspects of using information resources and publishing in new circumstances. This seminar will try to discover return on investment beyond quantifiable value in the form of complex possible outcomes that cannot be directly measured using quantitative indicators, but must be assessed via the long-term quality assessment of their influence on study and research work output.
http://bit.ly/2aP8jtM

IFLA World Library and Information Congress
---------------------#-------------------
August 13-19, 2016
Columbus, OH
The theme of the 82nd IFLA Congress is "Connections. Collaboration. Community." The Congress will feature programmes from myriad library sectors.
http://bit.ly/2a79a8p

Chinese Institutional Repository Conference
----------------------------------------
ChongQing City, China
September 21-22, 2016
Hosted by the National Science Library, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and the Library of ChongQing University, the fourth Chinese IR Conference will feature EIFL open access programme manager Iryna Kuchma, who will speak about global open access repository developments and trends.
http://bit.ly/2afoULf

State of the Map
----------------------------------------
September 23-26, 2016
Brussels, Belgium
Talks, discussions and workshops, code and documentation sprints, all to improve the collaborative OpenStreetMap project.
http://bit.ly/28Z6Hxl

The Open Exchange for Social Change
----------------------------------------
October 4, 2016
Madrid, Spain
This pre-IOCD unconference aims to create a space where participants can exchange knowledge and understanding and build solidarity that will lead to better outcomes for IODC and beyond. It is an open space so that attendees can propose the most relevant and urgent topics for their work.
http://bit.ly/2aEpFg1

International Open Data Conference
----------------------------------------
October 6-7
Madrid, Spain
At IODC16, governments, civil society, multilateral organisations, and private companies will gather around a roadmap. the International Open Data Charter, in order to keep improving the governability, citizen engagement, innovation, and international development of open data initiatives.
http://bit.ly/1HQuPNW

Transparency Camp 2016

October 14-15, 2016
Cleveland, OH
The Sunlight Foundation chose Cleveland for this year's unconference in order to tap into the local expertise of an area with strong grassroots organisers and clear problems the community is trying to solve. The event aims to bring together librarians, government officials, technologists, civic leaders, community organisers, and others to figure out strategies and solutions for making local and state governance better, faster, smarter and more transparent.
http://bit.ly/2aP6RaV

Privacy+Security Forum
----------------------------------------
October 24-26, 2016
Washington, DC
Monday, October 24, is devoted to pre-conference workshops and "intensive days" - advanced discussion focused narrowly on a particular topic or industry. Proposals are welcome until April 30, 2016 based on the following guiding principles: bridge the silos between privacy and security; cover issues with depth and rigour; employ interaction, scenario-based learning, and extensive engagement; deliver practical takeaways from each session.
http://bit.ly/1RIzYhV

ODI Summit
----------------------------------------
November 1, 2016
London, UK
The annual Open Data Institute Summit will feature inspiring stories from around the world on how people are innovating with the web of data, and presentations from diverse innovators, from current startup founders to experienced, high-profile speakers such as World Wide Web inventor Tim Berners-Lee, AI expert Nigel Shadbolt and Lastminute.com founder Martha Lane Fox.
http://bit.ly/2ar2aXf

ICANN 57
----------------------------------------
November 3-9, 2016
Hyderabad, India
ICANN meetings provide a venue for progressing policy work, conducting outreach, exchanging best practices, conducting business deals, interacting among members of the ICANN Community, including board and staff, and learning about ICANN.
http://bit.ly/29CmNg9

Mozilla Festival
----------------------------------------
November 6-8, 2016
London, UK
MozFest is an annual celebration of the open Web. Participants are diverse, including engineers, artists, activists, and educators, but share the common belief that the Web can make lives better, unlocks opportunity, spurs creativity, teaches valuable skills, and connects far-flung people and ideas. The Festival seeks to improve the Web with new ideas and creations.
http://bit.ly/1WmxRQ0

OpenCon
----------------------------------------
November 12-14, 2016
Washington, DC
At this event, the next generation can learn about Open Access, Open Education, and Open Data, develop critical skills, and catalyse action toward a more open system of research and education. OpenCon will convene students and early career academic professionals, both in person and through satellite events around the world and serve as a powerful catalyst for projects led by the next generation to advance OpenCon's three focus areas.
http://bit.ly/1OocSMD

Internet Governance Forum
----------------------------------------
December 6-9, 2016 (TBC)
Guadalajara, Mexico
With the UN's renewal in December 2015, the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) consolidates itself as a platform to bring people together from various stakeholder groups as equals, in discussions on public policy issues relating to the Internet. While there is no negotiated outcome, the IGF informs and inspires those with policy-making power in both the public and private sectors. At their annual meeting delegates discuss, exchange information and share good practices with each other.
http://bit.ly/28YwZPX

Open Government Partnership Summit
----------------------------------------
December 7-9, 2016
Paris, France
Representatives from governments, academia, civil society and international organizations will gather to share their experiences and best practices and push forward the open government global agenda in light of the great challenges of the modern world. As a forum for sharing best practices, OGP provides a unique platform that brings together, stimulates and expands the community of state reformers worldwide.
http://bit.ly/2b1IY0Q

Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection
----------------------------------------
January 25-27, 2017
Brussels, Belgium
The tenth CPDP's main theme is artificial intelligence. The conference is accepting proposals for panels in April (from academic consortia, research projects, think tanks, and other research organisations) and May (from individuals wishing to present academic research papers).
http://bit.ly/1OrQSv6

Rightscon 2017
----------------------------------------
March 29-31, 2017
Brussels, Belgium
RightsCon will tackle the most pressing issues at the intersection of technology and human rights.
http://bit.ly/I2ZAUZ

Open Repositories 2017
----------------------------------------
June 26-30, 2017
Brisbane, Australia
The annual Open Repositories Conference brings together users and developers of open digital repository platforms from higher education, government, galleries, libraries, archives and museums. The Conference provides an interactive forum for delegates from around the world to come together and explore the global challenges and opportunities facing libraries and the broader scholarly information landscape.
http://bit.ly/2aOCiGp

8th Conference on Open Access Scholarly Publishing
----------------------------------------
September 21-22, 2017
Arlington, VA
COASP's eighth edition will feature a diverse range of panels, events, and collaborative opportunities to bring together the open access community. With open access now at the top of the agendas of global governments, universities, libraries, funders, and policy makers, and of critical importance to researchers at all stages of their careers, COASP offers a crucial space for those working in open access around the world to come together and discuss developments, innovations, and best practices, and to make and build upon collaborations old and new.
http://bit.ly/OhXCyu

***

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Open Society Foundation, part of the Open Society Foundations, is a company limited by guarantee registered in England and Wales (company number 4571628) and a registered charity (charity number 1105069). Its registered office address is 7th Floor, Millbank Tower, 21-24 Millbank, London SW1P 4QP
News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week of 29 July 2016
====================================================

The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF. Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

Our staff, advisers and major grantees tweet at http://bit.ly/13j5fjq. Current and former grantees featured in this issue: EFF, La Quadrature du Net.


NEWS
=====
For breaking news stories, visit: http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:news/

US: Microsoft wins jurisdictional dispute
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The Center for Democracy and Technology reports that the US Second Circuit Court has ruled that Microsoft does not have to turn over emails stored on its Irish servers to US law enforcement seeking to compel disclosure. The ruling, which the Department of Justice may appeal to the Supreme Court, is widely seen as setting an important jurisdictional precedent. It is also an important victory for Microsoft, which argues that the US government should use the Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty (MLAT) to obtain the data and promotes the idea that storing data locally will ensure that data of Europeans are subject to Europe's more stringent privacy laws. However, UCL security researcher Steven Murdoch argues that the ruling will give false assurance to customers of US companies, because other circumstances might produce a different decision by US courts. Within days of the ruling, Gizmodo reported that President Barack Obama has proposed a plan to allow the US and UK to access data stored on servers in each other's countries as long as the searches were only for data relating to citizens of the country doing the searching. Both countries would need legislative approval.
CDT: http://bit.ly/2azvJXY
Murdoch: http://bit.ly/2axUD8C
ACLU: http://bit.ly/2axUEcN
Gizmodo: http://bit.ly/2akUEcH

France extends State of Emergency until January 2017
----------------------------------------------------------------------
La Quadrature du Net reports that in response to the Nice attacks the French government has extended the State of Emergency until January 2017 and amended the 2015 Intelligence Act to legalise domestic mass surveillance. The new provision extends real-time monitoring of communications data from individuals who had been "identified as a [terrorist] threat" - such as the 11,700 people with an "S-File" linked with radical Islamism - to anyone "likely related to a threat" or belonging to the entourage of someone so identified.
LQDN: http://bit.ly/2a2NWfq

Russia accused of interfering in US presidential elections
----------------------------------------------------------------------
As the Democratic national convention begins in Philadelphia, at Motherboard Thomas Rid, a Kings College London professor and author of Cyberwar Will Not Take Place, studies the evidence for attributing to state-sponsored Russian hackers the breach of the Democratic National Committee's server, which also exposed the organisation's opposition research on the Trump campaign. Rid sees the attack as setting a dangerous precedent for electronic interference by one country in the elections of another. Engadget confirms that the FBI is investigating the DNC email hack and is auditing the DNC's Republican counterpart, where no such hack has yet been reported. CNN reports that Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov has dismissed the claim, and reviews the history of the breach. The Guardian outlines Russian support for Donald Trump. On July 22, Wikileaks published the collection of 19,234 emails taken from DNC servers as the second in its "Hillary Leaks" series (the first was a collection of emails from Hillary Clinton's home server). On July 25, the Guardian reported that the emails' exposure of DNC leaders' active favouritism for Hillary Clinton over Bernie Sanders has forced the resignation of DNC chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz.
Motherboard: http://bit.ly/2a2OMbR
Engadget: http://engt.co/2au3Sp8
CNN: http://cnn.it/2aBpE9U
Guardian (Trump): http://bit.ly/2aAqk29
Guardian (Schultz): http://bit.ly/2agJll0

Turkey, US: Critics accuse Wikileaks of publishing confidential personal information
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Gizmodo reports that the 19,234 emails from Democratic National Committee members posted online by Wikileaks include the credit card, Social Security, and passport numbers of many small individual donors - a treasure trove for identity fraudsters, a fact easily checked via Gizmodo's published search method. Meanwhile, at the Huffington Post, Zeynep Tufecki examines Wikileaks' previously published "AKP Email Archive", obtained a week before the attempted coup, published shortly afterwards, and almost immediately blocked by the Turkish internet authority, and finds nothing that serves the public interest. However, she reports that among related files to which Wikileaks linked are massive databases of highly sensitive personal information about millions of Turkish individuals. One such includes almost every adult woman in Turkey, giving real - and correct as far as Tufecki could check- home addresses, mobile phone numbers, and affiliation with AKP, the group that attempted to overthrow the government. "There is not a single good reason to put so many men and women in such danger of identity theft, harassment and worse," she concludes. On Twitter, Wikileaks responded: "The story is fabricated by an Erdogan apologist in Turkey. We have already lodged a complaint with Arianna Huffington." Soon afterwards, national security blogger Michael Best came forward to explain how the files were obtained and take responsibility for their release (he has deleted the bittorrent instance he created on the Internet Archive server to distribute them, the link Wikileaks promoted). "What happened was a perfect storm of events that I could have prevented, and wish I had," he writes.
Gizmodo: http://bit.ly/2ar17Xf
Huffington Post: http://huff.to/2akVpCw
Best: http://bit.ly/2agYWHl

US: EFF challenges Digital Millennium Copyright Act
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Based on 20 years of collected evidence, EFF has announced that it is mounting a new legal challenge to Section 1201 of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, which the EFF has opposed ever since its passage in 1998. The law, EFF argues, is unconstitutional because it impedes security research, blocks remixes, and inhibits the use of fair use rights. "Copyright law," EFF adds in a second posting, "shouldn't be casting a legal shadow over activities as basic as popping the hood of your own car, offering commentary on a shared piece of culture (and helping others do so), and testing security infrastructure."
EFF: http://bit.ly/2afobd1

Historical data leads to Kickass Torrents owner's arrest
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Torrentfreak reports that the alleged owner of Kickass Torrents (KAT), the world's largest torrent site, has been arrested in Poland on a request from US authorities, and is waiting to learn if he will be extradited. Several types of data led investigators to Artem Vaulin: historical Whois records for early KAT domains showing his name, and cross-referencing that showed the same IP address was used to log into KAT's Facebook account and to conduct transactions on iTunes. In the criminal complaint, Business Insider finds the reason behind KAT's near-immediate access to copies of movies, often within days of their original release: conversion using a telecine machine, which directly converts cinema reels to digital file - a method that implies insider access. Torrentfreak also reports that Gary Fung, the Canadian founder of the now-defunct torrent site Isohunt, has settled with the music industry for $66 million.
TorrentFreak (KAT): http://bit.ly/2agISz4
Business Insider: http://read.bi/2aNr9Bk
TorrentFreak (Fung): http://bit.ly/2ar1kcY


FEATURES AND ANALYSIS
====================
For more features and analysis selected by the Program team, visit:
http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:oped/

Best case scenarios for copyright: education
----------------------------------------------------------------------
As part of Communia's effort to document best case scenarios for copyright, in this article Teresa Nobre and Alari Rammo discuss the educational exceptions in the Estonian Copyright Act, which were adopted in 1992. These include the free use of copyrighted works for scientific, educational, informational, and judicial purposes and allow public performances of protected works in front of limited school-related audiences. Estonia's approach, they write, has led to "a relatively abstract norm that allows for a broad spectrum of unauthorised uses" that is similar to open-ended defences like the US Fair Use doctrine. The authors suggest, however, that Estonia's law could be improved as two exceptions overlap, causing issues of interpretation.
Communia (PDF): http://bit.ly/2aj5kLa

Refugees and communication
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this three-minute video clip, best watched on a mobile phone, the BBC shows the importance of mobile phones to refugees, who struggle to identify their location, reunite with dispersed family and friends, and find safety. The idea was inspired by the stories the BBC collected in researching the communications needs of those fleeing their countries. Alongside the clip is a research report written from in-depth interviews with 79 refugees and 45 humanitarian actors studying refugees' communication behaviours and information needs during their journey, in Greek transit camps, and in Germany.
BBC: http://bbc.in/2aeuQ28

Legal analysis of Pokémon Go
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting at Freedom to Tinker, Tiffany Li offers a legal analysis of the issues surrounding the sudden popularity of Pokémon Go, which has spawned stories of absorbed users falling off cliffs and hitting a police car and privacy violations when private locations are misidentified on the map as gyms. Li examines Pokémon owner Niantic's liability for injuries, the privacy implications of the amount of information the Pokémon app requires, and intellectual property and trespass concerns. These issues, Li concludes are not specific to Pokémon Go; they will apply to any augmented reality game. Bitchmedia reports on a novel use of the game by the Clinton campaign: to lure unregistered voters to volunteers who help them register.
Freedom to Tinker: http://bit.ly/2adaozE
Bitchmedia: http://bit.ly/2ahI3t5

UK: The referendum and the future
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting for the Open Government Partnership, Birkbeck College lecturer in politics Ben Worthy discusses the likely future of open government for the post-EU UK. Brexit itself, he writes, will soon become a transparency issue as negotiators seek to balance the advantages of keeping their goals confidential with the need to reassure Leave voters that their goals have not been sold out. At the London Review of Books, John Lanchester mulls how an idea that was considered lunatic fringe in 1997 became a mainstream reality in 2016: today, he writes, geography matters more than class, the white working class has been abandoned, and the divisions between the two main parties do not reflect at all the economic divisions that dominate many people's thinking.
Open Government Partnership: http://bit.ly/2a7GwDc
London Review of Books: http://bit.ly/2a2PplJ

Burkina Faso: Reconstructing history
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting at mySociety, Dave Whiteland writes about EveryPolitician's ambition to provide data about every politician in the world and Teg-Wende Idriss Tinto's efforts to reconstruct the history of Burkina Faso's Parliament, which was lost when insurgents set a fire in the National Assembly building in 2014, destroying 90% of the country's records. Tinto is appealing for assistance from anyone with information on the members of Burkina Faso's parliament from independence in 1960 until 1992.
https://www.mysociety.org/2016/07/15/everypolitician-and-historic-data/
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/pmo-network/NhNUqkl8UoY/MS754DJvAQAJ

If financial systems were hacked
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article, part of its "The World If" series, The Economist imagines what would happen if the global financial infrastructure were attacked, for example, via clearing houses or payments systems. To date, cyberattacks have focused on single banks. In this scenario, however, the attack might begin by tweaking numbers so that the clearing houses can't settle up at the end of each day. Ultimately, the system needs to plan for response-and-recovery instead of assuming that their security is sufficient to ensure that such attacks cannot happen. Other scenarios in the series include terrorist access to nuclear weapons, states trading territories, and universal drone ownership.
Economist (finance): http://bit.ly/2agJPaC
Economist (WorldIf): http://bit.ly/2azxaWi


***

DIARY
==============
To see more events recommended by the Information Program team, visit:
https://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:events/. If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

21st-Century Literacies for Public Libraries
----------------------------------------
August 10-11, 2016
Philadelphia, PA
At this two-day satellite meeting, presented by IFLA's Public Libraries Section, delegates will share and learn from each other's experiences in developing and delivering services that encompass today's expanded concept of literacy, which includes not only the traditional ability to read and write but proficiency in a range of other literacies such as civic, health, financial, digital, and information.
http://bit.ly/1PZhExo

IFLA World Library and Information Congress
---------------------#-------------------
August 13-19, 2016
Columbus, OH
The theme of the 82nd IFLA Congress is "Connections. Collaboration. Community." The Congress will feature programmes from myriad library sectors.
http://bit.ly/2a79a8p

Chinese Institutional Repository Conference
----------------------------------------
ChongQing City, China
September 21-22, 2016
Hosted by the National Science Library, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and the Library of ChongQing University, the fourth Chinese IR Conference will feature EIFL open access programme manager Iryna Kuchma, who will speak about global open access repository developments and trends.
http://bit.ly/2afoULf

State of the Map
----------------------------------------
September 23-26, 2016
Brussels, Belgium
Talks, discussions and workshops, code and documentation sprints, all to improve the collaborative OpenStreetMap project.
http://bit.ly/28Z6Hxl

International Open Data Conference
----------------------------------------
October 6-7
Madrid, Spain
At IODC16, governments, civil society, multilateral organisations, and private companies will gather around a roadmap. the International Open Data Charter, in order to keep improving the governability, citizen engagement, innovation, and international development of open data initiatives.
http://bit.ly/1HQuPNW

Privacy+Security Forum
----------------------------------------
October 24-26, 2016
Washington, DC
Monday, October 24, is devoted to pre-conference workshops and "intensive days" - advanced discussion focused narrowly on a particular topic or industry. Proposals are welcome until April 30, 2016 based on the following guiding principles: bridge the silos between privacy and security; cover issues with depth and rigour; employ interaction, scenario-based learning, and extensive engagement; deliver practical takeaways from each session.
http://bit.ly/1RIzYhV

ODI Summit
----------------------------------------
November 1, 2016
London, UK
The annual Open Data Institute Summit will feature inspiring stories from around the world on how people are innovating with the web of data, and presentations from diverse innovators, from current startup founders to experienced, high-profile speakers such as World Wide Web inventor Tim Berners-Lee, AI expert Nigel Shadbolt and Lastminute.com founder Martha Lane Fox.
http://bit.ly/2ar2aXf

ICANN 57
----------------------------------------
November 3-9, 2016
Hyderabad, India
ICANN meetings provide a venue for progressing policy work, conducting outreach, exchanging best practices, conducting business deals, interacting among members of the ICANN Community, including board and staff, and learning about ICANN.
http://bit.ly/29CmNg9

Mozilla Festival
----------------------------------------
November 6-8, 2016
London, UK
MozFest is an annual celebration of the open Web. Participants are diverse, including engineers, artists, activists, and educators, but share the common belief that the Web can make lives better, unlocks opportunity, spurs creativity, teaches valuable skills, and connects far-flung people and ideas. The Festival seeks to improve the Web with new ideas and creations.
http://bit.ly/1WmxRQ0

OpenCon
----------------------------------------
November 12-14, 2016
Washington, DC
At this event, the next generation can learn about Open Access, Open Education, and Open Data, develop critical skills, and catalyse action toward a more open system of research and education. OpenCon will convene students and early career academic professionals, both in person and through satellite events around the world and serve as a powerful catalyst for projects led by the next generation to advance OpenCon's three focus areas.
http://bit.ly/1OocSMD

Internet Governance Forum
----------------------------------------
December 6-9, 2016 (TBC)
Guadalajara, Mexico
With the UN's renewal in December 2015, the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) consolidates itself as a platform to bring people together from various stakeholder groups as equals, in discussions on public policy issues relating to the Internet. While there is no negotiated outcome, the IGF informs and inspires those with policy-making power in both the public and private sectors. At their annual meeting delegates discuss, exchange information and share good practices with each other.
http://bit.ly/28YwZPX

Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection
----------------------------------------
January 25-27, 2017
Brussels
The tenth CPDP's main theme is artificial intelligence. The conference is accepting proposals for panels in April (from academic consortia, research projects, think tanks, and other research organisations) and May (from individuals wishing to present academic research papers).
http://bit.ly/1OrQSv6

Rightscon 2017
----------------------------------------
March 29-31, 2017
Brussels, Belgium
RightsCon will tackle the most pressing issues at the intersection of technology and human rights.
http://bit.ly/I2ZAUZ


***

Hear more from the Information Program!
================================
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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/

Open Society Foundation, part of the Open Society Foundations, is a company limited by guarantee registered in England and Wales (company number 4571628) and a registered charity (charity number 1105069). Its registered office address is 7th Floor, Millbank Tower, 21-24 Millbank, London SW1P 4QP