I'll have more to say later, most especially about the intriguing ideas proposed by the audience, but for now here are my slides from today's talk at OpenTech.

talk-opentech-2017.pdf

wg
News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week ending 12 May 2017
====================================================
The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF. Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

Our staff, advisers and major grantees tweet at http://bit.ly/13j5fjq. Current and former grantees featured in this issue: Open Rights Group.

Master's Degree program in fundamental rights, technopolitics, and digital culture
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The Barcelona-based Universitat Pompeu Fabra has announced that pre-enrollment has opened for a Master's Degree course in fundamental rights, technopolitics, and digital culture, taught in Spanish and organized by the multidisiciplinary artist and activist Simona Levi and the non-profit activist platform Xnet. The goal is to train active agents to work with new models of strategic action, versatile actors who can bring into being new forms of organisation and initiatives, who are able to work with them and lead sectors that transform, and are in the process of being transformed.
http://bit.ly/2oQs7D4

NEWS
=====
For breaking news stories, visit: http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:news/

Austria: Court orders global removal of Facebook hate speech postings
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Reuters reports that an Austrian court has ruled that Facebook must remove - globally - postings deemed as hate speech. The case was brought by the country's Green party over postings that insulted its leader. The ruling is one of a number of moves made by European legislators to curb hate speech and incitement to violence online. Last month, Germany's cabinet approved a plan to fine social networks up to €50 million if they fail to remove postings quickly. The Open Rights Group reports that in the UK the dissolution of Parliament was marked by the release of a partial report from the disbanding Home Affairs Select Committee that branded social media companies as irresponsible for not doing more to proactively remove extremist material.
Reuters: http://reut.rs/2q9H5XR
ORG: http://bit.ly/2qbMXOS

UK: Global operation influenced the EU referendum vote
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In the Observer, Carole Cadwalladr reports that the EU referendum was influenced by a shadowy global operation involving big data and billionaire friends of US President Donald Trump, and asks whether the upcoming British general election is safe from interference. At the heart of Cadwalladr's investigation is a Canadian web analytics company, AggregateIQ, which, invoices uploaded by the Electoral Commission show, was paid more by the Vote Leave campaign than any other company in any other campaign in the entire referendum. Cadwalladr concludes that Britain in 2017 looks increasingly like a "'managed democracy" leading the way into a "brave, new, increasingly undemocratic world".
Guardian: http://bit.ly/2r8pBcP

China: New rules require licensing to use social media
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Global Voices reports that China's State Council Information Office has released new regulations that increase restrictions on news reporting and require individuals to submit real identity information when subscribing to a news information service. Internet news services that use websites, apps, forums, blogs, microblogs, mobile public platforms such as WeChat, instant messaging, and livecasting are required to obtain permits from the Internet News Information Unit. Sources quoted in the story believe that the purpose of targeting readers is to stop anonymous comments on social media news threads. The regulation comes into effect in June 1. The US's ABC News reports that China is also building its own 300,000-entry online encyclopedia written by hand-picked scholars and experts, which the public will not be allowed to edit.
Global Voices: http://bit.ly/2pEKwlJ
ABC: http://abcn.ws/2r8S0zI

Turkey: Government blocks Wikipedia under security law
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Reuters reports that a Turkish court has rejected an appeal by Wikipedia against a government decision to block access to all language editions of the online encyclopedia. Earlier, Reuters had reported that the Turkish BTK telecommunications watchdog instituted the ban on April 29, citing a law allowing it to ban access to websites deemed obscene or a threat to national security. The ban was originally detected by the Turkey Blocks monitoring site.
Reuters (court): http://reut.rs/2r6YQoe
Reuters (ban): http://reut.rs/2r8DoAk
Turkey Blocks: http://bit.ly/2pr31zb

France: Hackers try to orchestrate a win for National Front's Marine Le Pen
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The Daily Beast reports that two days before the May 7 French presidential election someone dumped 9GB of emails and documents supposedly taken from the Emmanuel Macron campaign to 4Chan, from where they were republished by Wikileaks. With minimal time left before the 48-hour pre-election campaign blackout began, the Macron campaign issued a statement saying it had been hacked and that many of the leaked documents were fakes. Mounir Mahjoubi, the head of Macron's digital team, told The Daily Beat that part of Macron's campaign strategy was to sign on to the phishing pages and plant bogus and conflicting information. At BuzzFeed, Zeynep Tufecki defended the right to privacy of the people in the emails, and advised French reporters that they should not allow the dump to distract them from reporting on more important issues, both before and after the election. Rather allowing the hackers to lead the story by debunking - and thereby repeating - false stories, she says, aggressively report on the misinformation campaign itself, and dig into its origins. BuzzFeed reports that a crucial reason for the failure of attempts to use similar tactics to those of the US presidential election to orchestrate a win for Le Pen was that no one on 4Chan knew French. The National Front memes that poured onto Twitter were in English and ignored differences in French culture, so the French media didn't pick up the fake stories - and few in France use Facebook. An investigation published by Le Monde demonstrates that the dissemination of "MarconLeaks" was organized by the extreme right wing of the United States  - with astonishing detail.
Daily Beast: http://thebea.st/2q9Ucs7
Buzzfeed (Tufecki): http://bzfd.it/2qzpk5N
Buzzfeed (4Chan): https://www.buzzfeed.com/ryanhatesthis/how-the-american-far-right-tired-and-failed-to-hijack-the
Le Monde: http://lemde.fr/2pFtg0L

Netherlands: Open access requirement blocks researchers from Oxford journals
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The Times Higher Education Supplement reports that academics in Dutch universities have lost access to journals published by Oxford University Press after 18 months of talks about subscription prices failed to reach agreement. The Association of Universities in the Netherlands (VSNU) has set a mandate to achieve 100% open access publishing by 2020. In mid-February, Science Magazine reported that Elsevier had restored access for German researchers after blocking them for more than a month; negotiations continued.
THES: http://bit.ly/2r6Uj5w


FEATURES AND ANALYSIS
====================
For more features and analysis selected by the Program team, visit:
http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:oped/

New antitrust rules for the data economy
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article, The Economist argues that network effects mean that the rise of data as a more valuable resource than oil requires a new approach to antitrust rules. Rather than consider a company's overall size, regulatory authorities need to consider the extent of its data assets; this rule would have sounded the alarm over Facebook's acquisition of revenue-less WhatsApp. Second, regulators should redress the balance of power between online service providers and those who supply their data (that is, us). As part of this rule, greater transparency over the data held and the money it brings in would be helpful, as would governments opening up their own data and managing crucial parts of the data economy as public infrastructure (the article cites India's Aadhaar digital identity system as an example).
Economist: http://econ.st/2pEvVqy

The lives of Google raters
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article at Ars Technica, Annalee Newitz studies the working lives of Google's thousands of "raters", who test that the company's algorithms correctly deliver search results and personalization features. The recent withdrawal of advertisers who found their ads placed inside extremist YouTube videos led Google to announce it would use its raters' efforts to rectify the situation. The raters work from home for contractors such as Leapforce; meet only virtually, and are assigned tasks via the company's "Raterhub" at rates predetermined by Google. Raters must pass rigorous exams on the company's 160-page book of guidelines, and require frequent (often unpaid) retraining; their work is randomly spot-checked by bots. The ten raters who spoke to Newitz say the job is meaningful, integral to Google, and pays $13.50 to $17.40 an hour, comfortably above US minimum wage. On April 3, Newitz reports, LeapForce abruptly notified its raters that their hours per week would be limited to 26 as of June 1, a change that appears to be due to US law regarding healthcare benefits and opens up questions about who exactly employs them. The article concludes by quoting UCLA professor Sarah Roberts, who after five years of studying the lives of raters concludes that although Google likes to boast about its AI, "Actually, their AIs are people in the Philippines".
Ars Technica: http://bit.ly/2qz5jfC

Profile of Richard Stallman
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this candid and lengthy profile of MacArthur award-winner and free software pioneer Richard Stallman at Psychology Today, Matthew Hutson discusses Stallman's unyielding philosophical objections to proprietary software and surveillance, along with the origins of the open source movement and Stallman's efforts to "save us from a software industry he considers predatory in ways we've yet to imagine".
Psychology Today: http://bit.ly/2pEv1dM

YouTube economics
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this New York Times article, Sapna Maheshwari recounts the story of US ghost hunter Tim Wood, whose monthly $6,000 income from YouTube in 2016 has plummeted since major advertisers began pulling their ads to stop them from showing up on videos promoting hate speech and terrorism. Wood has failed to get useful help from YouTube product managers. Maheshwari notes that there are many such stories involving YouTube personalities with small but engaged audiences such as comedians, LGBTQ advocates, and political commentators - essentially injured in the crossfire between Google and its customers. In a video clip, EEVblog owner and Australian engineer David L. Jones explains in detail the finances of his YouTube channel and the mechanics of the statements he receives. Jones, who became a full-time YouTuber in 2011, uses his channel to teach electronics by tearing down and rebuilding various pieces of equipment. He makes approximately $40,000 a year from advertising on his channel, which he supplements with a Patreon page, blog, website, community forum, and online shop.
NY Times: http://nyti.ms/2q9NzpK
EEVblog (YouTube): http://bit.ly/2pFvJrS

Facebook advertising and targeting depressed teens
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The Guardian reports that The Australian has obtained an internal report produced by Facebook executives that outlines the company's data analytics capabilities to advertisers. According to The Australian, the document describes how the social network monitors posts and photos in real time and uses the gathered data to identify teenagers' moods. In a follow-up opinion piece, former Facebook executive Antonio Garcia-Martinez says that Facebook will never try to limit this kind of use of the company's data unless public uproar forces it to.
Guardian (report): http://bit.ly/2r72NcF
Guardian (Garcia-Martinez): http://bit.ly/2qzfbWu

How discrimination against women killed the British computer industry
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this podcast from Data and Society, Marie Hicks, assistant professor of technology history at the Illinois Institute of Technology, discusses research from her new book, Programmed Inequality: How Britain Discarded Women Technologists and Lost Its Edge in Computing (MIT Press, 2017). Over the 30 years from the 1940s to the 1970s, she argues, structural discrimination against women destroyed Britain's global lead in electronic computing. She explains the mechanics of the "gender flip" that saw the early female-dominated computer industry turn predominantly male and says the story provides lessons for all post-industrial superpowers, including the US.
Data & Society: http://bit.ly/2q8wAVf


***

DIARY
==============
To see more events recommended by the Information Program team, visit:
https://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:events/. If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

Robots Exhibition
----------------------------------------
February 8 - September 13
London, UK
The Science Museum's 2017 robots exhibition includes robotic artifacts over five centuries, from a 16th century mechanized monk to the latest research developments. Focusing on why they exist rather than on how they work, the exhibition explores the ways robots mirror humanity and the insights they offer into our ambitions, desires and position in a rapidly changing world.
http://bit.ly/2kpgPn2

Human Rights Watch Film Festival
----------------------------------------
March 6-June 18
London, UK; Chicago Illinois; Toronto, Canada; New York, NY
The 16 human rights documentaries included in this peripatetic festival highlight individuals and groups exhibiting courageous resilience in challenging times. Among the human rights topics represented are the integrity of the press; the experience of refugees seeking safety; and factory workers protesting chemical harms from their work in the Chinese electronics industry. Nicholas de Pencier's BLACK CODE, based on Ronald Deibert's book of the same name, follows members of Toronto-based Citizen Lab as they document civil society activism in Tibet, Syria, Brazil, and Pakistan.
http://bit.ly/2mbHEiW

Transform Africa Summit 2017
----------------------------------------
May 12-12, 2017
Kigali, Rwanda
ICT experts from across Africa and beyond will convene to discuss the transformation of Africa using the power of technology. The forum will include side events such as the Smart Women Summit and the Africa Smart Cities forum, which is backed by 11 African countries.
http://bit.ly/2pqHvJF

OpenTech
----------------------------------------
May 13, 2017
London, UK
OpenTech 2017 is an informal, low cost, one-day conference on slightly different approaches to technology, experience and democracy. Talks by people who work on things that matter guarantee a day of thoughtful talks leading to conversations with friends.
http://bit.ly/2lmW53w

4th Africa Library Summit and 2nd AfLIA conference
----------------------------------------
May 14-20, 2017
Yaounde, Cameroon
Moved from Ethiopia to the site of the second bidder due to safety concerns, this conference co-locates the fourth Africa Library Sumit and the second African Library and Information Associations and Institutions conference.
http://bit.ly/2hsw64E

Citizen Science Conference 2017
----------------------------------------
May 17-20, 2017
St Paul, Minnesota
The biennial citizen science conference brings together a diverse group of researchers, practitioners, community organizations, and participants.
http://bit.ly/2jspOWl

Transparency Camp
----------------------------------------
May 22, 2017
Phoenix, Arizona
The Sunlight Foundation and the Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting, Galvanize, and the Arizona Institute for Digital Progress are teaming up to present Tcamp 2017, an un-conference that will bring together the government, developer and journalist communities to discuss and solve problems relating to making government data open and accessible to the public.
http://bit.ly/2oXkH4t

IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy
----------------------------------------
May 22-24, 2017
San Jose, California
The 38th annual meeting will present developments in computer security and electronic privacy, and for bringing together researchers and practitioners in the field.
http://bit.ly/2hsqUhj

Workshop on Technology and Consumer Protection
----------------------------------------
May 22-24, 2017
San Jose, California
Co-hosted with the IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy, ConPro will explore computer science topics with an impact on consumers. This workshop has a strong security and privacy slant, with an overall focus on ways in which computer science can prevent, detect, or address the potential for technology to deceive or unfairly harm consumers.
http://bit.ly/2fJ6ShN

Privacy Law Scholars
----------------------------------------
June 1-2
Berkeley, California
The tenth annual Privacy Law Scholars workshop will assemble a wide array of privacy law scholars and practitioners from around the world to discuss papers in progress. Scholars from many disciplines, including psychology, economics, sociology, philosophy, political science, computer science, and mathematics also participate.
http://bit.ly/2ln2Rq3

Personal Democracy Forum CEE 2017
----------------------------------------
June 8-9, 2017
New York, NY
The theme is PDF17 is "What We Do Now". Attendees will get connected, get inspired, learn with today's new and veteran organizers alike, and discover how what we do now can make all the difference.
http://bit.ly/2oaSCT5

Next Library Festival 2017
----------------------------------------
June 11-14, 2017
Aarhus, Denmark
Next Library 2017 will offer a "patchwork" of co-learning, co-creative, participatory, engaging, pluralistic and interactive meetings, and lots of parallel sessions, keynote speakers, wildcard sessions, demos/exhibitions, gaming, Networking Dinner Party, Get2Gether, Social un-conferences, alternative events and surprises.
http://bit.ly/2hHNt4W

Future Perfect
----------------------------------------
Jun 16, 2017
New York, NY
Data & Society Research Institute's Speculative Fiction Reading Group will host Future Perfect, a conference exploring the use, significance, and discontents of speculative design, narrative, and world-building in technology, policy, and culture. Participation is limited. Those interested in attending this Conference should apply by May 12, and may either 1) propose work to be exhibited and/or presented, or 2) describe how their work makes them a relevant discussant/participant.
http://bit.ly/2qcFAcj

CERN Workshop on Innovations in Scholarly Communication
----------------------------------------
June 21-23, 2017
Geneva, Switzerland
The organizers of the biennial CERN Workshop on Innovations in Scholarly Communication - OAI10 - include representatives from the Open Society Foundations, SPARC, PloS, CERN, UCL, and other academic institutions..
http://bit.ly/2jzXj6X

Data Power 2017
----------------------------------------
June 22-23, 2017
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
The Data Power 2017 conference asks: how can we reclaim some form of data-based power and autonomy, and advance data-based technological citizenship, while living in regimes of data power? Confirmed speakers include Helen Nissenbaum, Frank Pasquale, Stefania Milan, and Paul N. Edwards.
http://bit.ly/2p7GymW

Open Repositories 2017
----------------------------------------
June 26-30, 2017
Brisbane, Australia
The annual Open Repositories Conference brings together users and developers of open digital repository platforms from higher education, government, galleries, libraries, archives and museums. The Conference provides an interactive forum for delegates from around the world to come together and explore the global challenges and opportunities facing libraries and the broader scholarly information landscape.
http://bit.ly/2aOCiGp

Summer courses on privacy and international copyright laws
----------------------------------------
July 3-7, 2017
Amsterdam, Netherlands
These courses, run by the Institute for Information Law, are intensive post-graduate courses aimed to help professionals stay abreast of changing rules. The first, on privacy law and policy, focuses on recent developments in EU and US privacy law relating to the internet and online media. The second, on international copyright law, comprises nine seminars, each focused on one specific copyright issue.
http://bit.ly/2lmPgim

AI Now Symposium
----------------------------------------
Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA
July 10, 2017
The second annual symposium of the AI Now Initiative, led by Kate Crawford and Meredith Whittaker, will be held at the MIT Media Lab. AI Now works across disciplines to understand the social impact of AI.
http://bit.ly/2psXm70

Citizen Lab Summer Institute
----------------------------------------
July 12-14
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
This year's conference is organized around five research streams: Network Interference and Freedom of Expression Online, Surveillance and Counter Surveillance, Security and Privacy of Apps, Corporate Transparency and Public Accountability, and a special session on Information Controls and Armed Conflict.
http://bit.ly/2oaGQrQ

IFLA World Libraries and Information Congress
----------------------------------------
August 19-25, 2017
Wroclaw, Poland
The theme of the 83rd annual IFLA congress will be "Achieving a healthy future together: diverse and emerging roles for health information professionals".
http://bit.ly/2gErkVa

#CivicTechFest 2017
----------------------------------------
September 10-16. 2017
Taipei, China
Asia's first-ever civic technology festival and conference, #CivicTechFest" will feature a series of forums, workshops, roundtables, conferences, and hackathons related to open data and open government.
http://bit.ly/2q9xali

TICTeC@Taipei
----------------------------------------
Expanding from its annual conference in Florence in April, mySociety's annual conference, TICTeC, which focuses on the impacts of civic technology, will provide two days of sessions as part of #CivicTechFest.
http://bit.ly/2qbx3Uq

Privacy + Security Forum
----------------------------------------
October 4-6, 2017
Washington, DC
The conference breaks down the silos of security and privacy by bringing together leaders from both fields.
http://bit.ly/1PZhExo

Mozfest 2017
----------------------------------------
October 27-29, 2017
London, UK
https://ti.to/Mozilla/mozfest-2017/en
The world's leading festival for the open internet movement will feature influential thinkers from around the world to build, debate, and explore the future of a healthy internet.
http://bit.ly/2oaIXvK

ORGcon 2017
----------------------------------------
November 4, 2017
London, UK
ORGCon is the UK's biggest digital rights conference. This year's theme is: The Digital Fightback.
http://bit.ly/2prFqye


***

Hear more from the Information Program!
================================
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Other possible:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/will-democracy-survive-big-data-and-artificial-intelligence/
http://www.theverge.com/2017/3/15/14935360/automation-robots-ai-manufacturing-future-sxsw-2017
News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week ending 28 April 2017
====================================================
The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF. Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

Our staff, advisers and major grantees tweet at http://bit.ly/13j5fjq.

PROGRAM NEWS
==============

Master's Degree program in fundamental rights, technopolitics, and digital culture
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The Barcelona-based Universitat Pompeu Fabra has announced that pre-enrollment has opened for a Master's Degree course in fundamental rights, technopolitics, and digital culture, taught in Spanish and organized by the multidisiciplinary artist and activist Simona Levi and the non-profit activist platform Xnet. The goal is to train active agents to work with new models of strategic action, versatile actors who can bring into being new forms of organisation and initiatives, who are able to work with them and lead sectors that transform, and are in the process of being transformed.
http://bit.ly/2oQs7D4

NEWS
=====
For breaking news stories, visit: http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:news/

Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales announces plan to fight fake news
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The Guardian reports that Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales is launching a new online publication, Wikitribune, "news by the people and for the people". The site will rely on collaboration between professional journalists, who will be paid by raising money through a crowdfunding campaign, and citizen volunteers. Journalists will be expected to share full transcripts, audio, and video of interviews; community contributors will provide extra material and fact-checking. Wales notes that fake news has had little-to-no impact on the Wikipedia community. The site goes live on April 25 and is free to access.
Guardian: http://bit.ly/2pDzLEI
Wikipedia: http://bit.ly/2oNBD91

India adopts British Internet Watch Foundation blocklist
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Sputnik News reports that the Indian government has asked the nation's ISPs to adopt the UK Internet Watch Foundation's blocklist of sites hosting child abuse images. Indian ISPs, like their British counterparts, will have to pay a fee to access the list. After the Supreme Court directed ISPs to address pornography, especially child pornography, India banned about 850 websites in 2015. The hotline India set up in September 2016 received 426 public complaints over the course of six months. According to its website, the IWF provides international reporting portals for a number of other countries that lack their own, including Bermuda, the Cayman Islands, and Uganda.
Sputnik News: http://bit.ly/2qjTwxx
IWF: http://bit.ly/2pqEkld

AI beats humans at poker
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The BBC reports that an AI program called Lengpudashi has beaten a team of six human poker players led by amateur champion Yue Du at Texas Hold'em in an exhibition match staged in Hainan, China. The human "Team Dragon" was composed of engineers, computer scientists, and investors, who relied on game theory and their knowledge of machine intelligence. Lengpudashi and its predecessor, Libratus, was written by Carnegie-Mellon computer science professor Tuomas Sandholm and PhD student Noam Brown and runs on a supercomputer in Pittsburgh. In January, Libratus beat four of the world's best poker professionals in a 20-day game. Poker, unlike Go or chess, is an "imperfect information game" in which success depends on strategy and the ability to both bluff and spot others bluffing.
BBC: http://bbc.in/2pDOgIZ

Global South calls on Tim Berners-Lee to stop digital colonialism
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Telesur reports that the Just Net Coalition, a network of internet accessibility activists from the Global South formed in New Delhi, India, in 2014, has sent an open letter to Tim Berners-Lee, asking him to stop accepting Encrypted Media Extensions, which they say is being installed without users' consent and blocks people in the Global South from accessing the same internet features available to those in North America and Europe. In addition, EME blocks those using open source multimedia software, which is used by most users in most Global South countries. The group also wants Berners-Lee to stop corporate interests from privatizing the internet by coopting the W3C. The letter remains open for endorsements until April 27.
Telesur: http://bit.ly/2pqGcKx
Just Net Coalition: http://bit.ly/2pmk6H5
Open letter (PDF): http://bit.ly/2oB6mLi

US: Trump administration endorses arresting Julian Assange
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The Guardian reports that US attorney general Jeff Sessions has said that the arrest of Wikileaks founder Julian Assange is now a "priority". Bringing charges could lead to an extradition request; however British authorities believe the UK has a prior legal obligation to extradite Assange to Sweden under the European arrest warrant. The Independent reports that US President Donald Trump has called arresting Assange "OK with me". Gizmodo notes earlier Trump statements: he called Wikileaks "disgraceful" in 2010 but publicly proclaimed at a rally in October 2016 that "I love Wikileaks". In the Guardian Trevor Timm argues that prosecuting Wikileaks would endanger the future of US journalism because every newspaper has at some point published classified information and the US administration would be unlikely to stop with prosecuting Assange. At her Emptywheel blog, Marcy Wheeler reviews the coverage and suggests that the Department of Justice wants to cut away at the First Amendment.
Guardian (arrest): http://bit.ly/2oNvLwR
Guardian (journalism): http://bit.ly/2qbpXPu
Gizmodo: http://bit.ly/2oQkmgy
Wheeler: http://bit.ly/2oB6Xwz

Burger King ad targets Google Home devices
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The Guardian reports that Burger King ran a 15-second TV ad that featured a man in a Burger King uniform leaning forward and saying, "OK, Google. What is the Whopper burger", intending that Google Home devices would begin reading out Wikipedia's Whopper entry. A few hours after the ad launched, the devices ceased responding. Australia's News Channel 9 reports that it took annoyed human users less time than that to begin editing the Wikipedia page to redefine the Whopper as being made of cyanide, toenail clippings, and rat meat.
Guardian: http://bit.ly/2pDVY5A
Channel 9: http://bit.ly/2oNwT3z


FEATURES AND ANALYSIS
====================
For more features and analysis selected by the Program team, visit:
http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:oped/

US: Political polarization is not about social media
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article at Vox, Ezra Klein discusses a new study released through the National Bureau of Economic Research that finds that social media is not the primary cause of increased political polarization in American politics. Using data from the American National Election Survey, researchers Levi Boxell, Matthew Gentzkow, and Jesse Shapiro compared young voters, 80% of whom used social media in 2012, and older voters, only 20% of whom did the same, and found that the voters' age correlated with polarization in eight of nine different tests. When the researchers constructed panels based on internet access, they found the same pattern: that polarization is increasing fastest among those who use the internet the least. The researchers suggest more important factors are increasing income inequality and non-digital media such as cable TV and talk radio.
Vox: http://bit.ly/2oNugyy

African smart cities: Nairobi and Cape Town
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article at How We Made It in Africa, Otavio Veras reports on the state of development of smart city projects in Africa's two most advanced cities, Nairobi (Kenya) and Cape Town (South Africa). Nairobi has elected to replicate the steps Singapore followed, and, beginning with the mobile payment system M-Pesa, the choice has driven ICT progress throughout the country. In Cape Town, the government established a four-pillar project to reach smart city status: digital infrastructure, digital inclusion, e-government, and digital economy. The city has implemented remote utilities meter reading, integrated its public safety services, installed a system for predicting fire incidents, deployed public wifi hotspots, and established Taxify, an Uber-like platform that offers passengers and drivers better support. All collected data is publicly available through the city's open data portal website.
How We Made It in Africa: http://bit.ly/2qbklEN

Study raises privacy concerns about smartphone sensors
----------------------------------------------------------------------
At Popular Science, Rob Verger reports that computer scientists at Newcastle University have been able to create malware that uses the sensors in smartphones that detect the orientation, tilt, and speed of movement to identify the user's PIN 74% of the time on the first try and 94% of the time on the third try. The study's lead author, Maryam Mehrnezhad, says that when not properly secured sensors embedded in anything from smartphones to streetlamps can reveal "basically everything about you". Fueled by concerns about the W3C's interest in defining a specification for a general Sensor API, researcher Lukasz Olejnik has been pointing out the privacy risks of making sensor data available for some time; his website features example analyses of the inferences that can be drawn from the output of sensors that measure ambient light and proximity.
Popular Science: http://bit.ly/2qjMNUa
W3C: http://bit.ly/2qcyynJ
Sensor Privacy: http://bit.ly/2oASNvH

Racial and gender bias in language processing algorithms
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The Guardian reports that a study has found that "word embedding", a tool used to improve the accuracy of natural language processing applications such as Google Translate, displays striking gender and racial biases matching those found in the results of implicit association tests on UK and US humans. Lead researcher Sandra Wachter suggests that the results of the study could be used to address and counter the bias in historical data rather than be seen as a threat. In a panel discussion shared online, O'Reilly Media editor Andy Oram, Ifeoma Ajunwa, Geoff A. Cohen, and Ben Green discuss algorithms as "the new boogie men in social control and institutional discrimination" and suggest how to fix them.
Guardian: http://bit.ly/2p8oTNN
Wachter (ACM, PDF): http://bit.ly/2oNocG8
Oram (Libreplanet): http://bit.ly/2p8fkOJ
Oran (Slideshare): http://bit.ly/2qbqr8r

How Google Books got lost
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this posting at Backchannel, former Salon editor Scott Rosenberg asks what happened to Google Books. Created as the company's first "moonshot", the project scanned 25 million books before copyright law blocked public access. The lawsuits, the rise of other more exciting ventures, and the loss of the sense that scanning more books would change the world have jointly caused progress to stall. Rosenberg concludes by imagining a future in which the database becomes available to machines to read.
Backchannel: http://bit.ly/2oNoi0s

The voice-activated threat to minority languages
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article at Mashable, Maria Gallucci discusses an Associated Press report that the Icelandic language is at risk of dying out, in part because voice-activated devices force Icelanders to use English. GPS devices struggle with Icelandic road names and voice-driven digital assistants have yet to be ported into the language. The Ministry of Education estimates it would cost about 1 billion Icelandic krona ($8.8 million) to create an open access database to assist developers. Other minority languages under similar threat include Irish Gaelic, Latvian, Maltese, and Lithuanian.
Mashable: http://on.mash.to/2p8nve8


***

DIARY
==============
To see more events recommended by the Information Program team, visit:
https://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:events/. If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

Robots Exhibition
----------------------------------------
February 8 - September 13
London, UK
The Science Museum's 2017 robots exhibition includes robotic artifacts over five centuries, from a 16th century mechanized monk to the latest research developments. Focusing on why they exist rather than on how they work, the exhibition explores the ways robots mirror humanity and the insights they offer into our ambitions, desires and position in a rapidly changing world.
http://bit.ly/2kpgPn2

Human Rights Watch Film Festival
----------------------------------------
March 6-June 18
London, UK; Chicago Illinois; Toronto, Canada; New York, NY
The 16 human rights documentaries included in this peripatetic festival highlight individuals and groups exhibiting courageous resilience in challenging times. Among the human rights topics represented are the integrity of the press; the experience of refugees seeking safety; and factory workers protesting chemical harms from their work in the Chinese electronics industry. Nicholas de Pencier's BLACK CODE, based on Ronald Deibert's book of the same name, follows members of Toronto-based Citizen Lab as they document civil society activism in Tibet, Syria, Brazil, and Pakistan.
http://bit.ly/2mbHEiW

Creative Commons Global Summit
----------------------------------------
April 28-30, 2017
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
This event will gather a global community of technologists, academics, activists, creatives, and legal experts to work together on the expansion and growth of the commons, open knowledge, and free culture for all.
http://bit.ly/2cO3x0P

IFLA MetLib 2017
----------------------------------------
April 30-May 5, 2017
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
The 2017 program theme is "Partnerships: Creating a new vision for libraries". Among the subthemes will be discussions of how and why to use, form, and manage partnerships, management tools, and best practices.
http://bit.ly/2ghPOPp

Transform Africa Summit 2017
----------------------------------------
May 12-12, 2017
Kigali, Rwanda
ICT experts from across Africa and beyond will convene to discuss the transformation of Africa using the power of technology. The forum will include side events such as the Smart Women Summit and the Africa Smart Cities forum, which is backed by 11 African countries.
http://bit.ly/2pqHvJF

OpenTech
----------------------------------------
May 13, 2017
London, UK
OpenTech 2017 is an informal, low cost, one-day conference on slightly different approaches to technology, experience and democracy. Talks by people who work on things that matter guarantee a day of thoughtful talks leading to conversations with friends.
http://bit.ly/2lmW53w

4th Africa Library Summit and 2nd AfLIA conference
----------------------------------------
May 14-20, 2017
Yaounde, Cameroon
Moved from Ethiopia to the site of the second bidder due to safety concerns, this conference co-locates the fourth Africa Library Sumit and the second African Library and Information Associations and Institutions conference.
http://bit.ly/2hsw64E

Citizen Science Conference 2017
----------------------------------------
May 17-20, 2017
St Paul, Minnesota
The biennial citizen science conference brings together a diverse group of researchers, practitioners, community organizations, and participants.
http://bit.ly/2jspOWl

Transparency Camp
----------------------------------------
May 22, 2017
Phoenix, Arizona
The Sunlight Foundation and the Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting, Galvanize, and the Arizona Institute for Digital Progress are teaming up to present Tcamp 2017, an un-conference that will bring together the government, developer and journalist communities to discuss and solve problems relating to making government data open and accessible to the public.
http://bit.ly/2oXkH4t

IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy
----------------------------------------
May 22-24, 2017
San Jose, California
The 38th annual meeting will present developments in computer security and electronic privacy, and for bringing together researchers and practitioners in the field.
http://bit.ly/2hsqUhj

Workshop on Technology and Consumer Protection
----------------------------------------
May 22-24, 2017
San Jose, California
Co-hosted with the IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy, ConPro will explore computer science topics with an impact on consumers. This workshop has a strong security and privacy slant, with an overall focus on ways in which computer science can prevent, detect, or address the potential for technology to deceive or unfairly harm consumers.
http://bit.ly/2fJ6ShN

Privacy Law Scholars
----------------------------------------
June 1-2
Berkeley, California
The tenth annual Privacy Law Scholars workshop will assemble a wide array of privacy law scholars and practitioners from around the world to discuss papers in progress. Scholars from many disciplines, including psychology, economics, sociology, philosophy, political science, computer science, and mathematics also participate.
http://bit.ly/2ln2Rq3

Personal Democracy Forum CEE 2017
----------------------------------------
June 8-9, 2017
New York, NY
The theme is PDF17 is "What We Do Now". Attendees will get connected, get inspired, learn with today's new and veteran organizers alike, and discover how what we do now can make all the difference.
http://bit.ly/2oaSCT5

Next Library Festival 2017
----------------------------------------
June 11-14, 2017
Aarhus, Denmark
Next Library 2017 will offer a "patchwork" of co-learning, co-creative, participatory, engaging, pluralistic and interactive meetings, and lots of parallel sessions, keynote speakers, wildcard sessions, demos/exhibitions, gaming, Networking Dinner Party, Get2Gether, Social un-conferences, alternative events and surprises.
http://bit.ly/2hHNt4W

Future Perfect
----------------------------------------
Jun 16, 2017
New York, NY
Data & Society Research Institute's Speculative Fiction Reading Group will host Future Perfect, a conference exploring the use, significance, and discontents of speculative design, narrative, and world-building in technology, policy, and culture. Participation is limited. Those interested in attending this Conference should apply by May 12, and may either 1) propose work to be exhibited and/or presented, or 2) describe how their work makes them a relevant discussant/participant.
http://bit.ly/2qcFAcj

CERN Workshop on Innovations in Scholarly Communication
----------------------------------------
June 21-23, 2017
Geneva, Switzerland
The organizers of the biennial CERN Workshop on Innovations in Scholarly Communication - OAI10 - include representatives from the Open Society Foundations, SPARC, PloS, CERN, UCL, and other academic institutions..
http://bit.ly/2jzXj6X

Data Power 2017
----------------------------------------
June 22-23, 2017
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
The Data Power 2017 conference asks: how can we reclaim some form of data-based power and autonomy, and advance data-based technological citizenship, while living in regimes of data power? Confirmed speakers include Helen Nissenbaum, Frank Pasquale, Stefania Milan, and Paul N. Edwards.
http://bit.ly/2p7GymW

Open Repositories 2017
----------------------------------------
June 26-30, 2017
Brisbane, Australia
The annual Open Repositories Conference brings together users and developers of open digital repository platforms from higher education, government, galleries, libraries, archives and museums. The Conference provides an interactive forum for delegates from around the world to come together and explore the global challenges and opportunities facing libraries and the broader scholarly information landscape.
http://bit.ly/2aOCiGp

Summer courses on privacy and international copyright laws
----------------------------------------
July 3-7, 2017
Amsterdam, Netherlands
These courses, run by the Institute for Information Law, are intensive post-graduate courses aimed to help professionals stay abreast of changing rules. The first, on privacy law and policy, focuses on recent developments in EU and US privacy law relating to the internet and online media. The second, on international copyright law, comprises nine seminars, each focused on one specific copyright issue.
http://bit.ly/2lmPgim

AI Now Symposium
----------------------------------------
Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA
July 10, 2017
The second annual symposium of the AI Now Initiative, led by Kate Crawford and Meredith Whittaker, will be held at the MIT Media Lab. AI Now works across disciplines to understand the social impact of AI.
http://bit.ly/2psXm70

Citizen Lab Summer Institute
----------------------------------------
July 12-14
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
This year's conference is organized around five research streams: Network Interference and Freedom of Expression Online, Surveillance and Counter Surveillance, Security and Privacy of Apps, Corporate Transparency and Public Accountability, and a special session on Information Controls and Armed Conflict.
http://bit.ly/2oaGQrQ

IFLA World Libraries and Information Congress
----------------------------------------
August 19-25, 2017
Wroclaw, Poland
The theme of the 83rd annual IFLA congress will be "Achieving a healthy future together: diverse and emerging roles for health information professionals".
http://bit.ly/2gErkVa

Privacy + Security Forum
----------------------------------------
October 4-6, 2017
Washington, DC
The conference breaks down the silos of security and privacy by bringing together leaders from both fields.
http://bit.ly/1PZhExo

Mozfest 2017
----------------------------------------
October 27-29, 2017
London, UK
https://ti.to/Mozilla/mozfest-2017/en
The world's leading festival for the open internet movement will feature influential thinkers from around the world to build, debate, and explore the future of a healthy internet.
http://bit.ly/2oaIXvK

***

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Other possible:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/will-democracy-survive-big-data-and-artificial-intelligence/
http://www.theverge.com/2017/3/15/14935360/automation-robots-ai-manufacturing-future-sxsw-2017
News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week ending 14 April 2017
====================================================
The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF. Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

Our staff, advisers and major grantees tweet at http://bit.ly/13j5fjq. Current and former grantees featured in this issue: APC, Derechos Digitales, EDRi, Engine Room, EFF, Open Rights Group, TACD.

NEWS
=====
For breaking news stories, visit: http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:news/

US: Congress votes to allow ISPs to monetize consumer data
----------------------------------------------------------------------
EFF reports that the US Congress voted at the end of March to bar the Federal Communications Commission from imposing privacy rules on ISPs, with the result that the cable and telephone industry is now free to hijack searches, sell browser data, and insert their own advertisements. President Donald Trump signed the bill into law on April 3, ending a decades-long tradition that communications providers must ask permission before seeking to monetize users' personal information. In the Guardian, Web inventor Tim Berners-Lee calls selling private citizens' browsing data "disgusting". At the Privacy + Security blog, Daniel Solove discusses possibilities for filling the now-open gap. EFF offers a guide to protecting yourself from your ISP.
EFF (ISPs): http://bit.ly/2o5WzZA
Guardian: http://bit.ly/2o4TibZ
Solove: http://bit.ly/2oXlDWR
EFF (guide): http://bit.ly/2o68ruw

UK: Home Secretary calls for encryption ban
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The Guardian reports that the British Home Secretary, Amber Rudd, has called for a ban on end-to-end encryption after the March attack at Westminster Bridge. Similar proposals were dropped from the Investigatory Powers Act (IPA) before it passed in 2016. The Guardian also notes that the IPA does give the government the power to compel the removal of "electronic protection" from communications or data but quotes Open Rights Group advisory council member Alec Muffett saying that using the legislation would force the government into a battle it would lose because the open source community would never comply. Web inventor Tim Berners-Lee, who was recently given the Turig award, has told the BBC that requiring a backdoor in encryption would be a "bad idea" and represents a massive security breach.
Guardian (encryption): http://bit.ly/2ootmK6
Guardian (IPA): http://bit.ly/2ooqqxa
BBC: http://bbc.in/2oXiR3U

EU: European Parliament criticizes EU-US Privacy Shield agreement
----------------------------------------------------------------------
EDRi reports that the European Parliament has adopted a new resolution covering the EU-US Privacy Shield agreement that permits the transfer to the US of the personal data relating to EU citizens despite the differences in privacy laws. The resolution finds some provisions of the agreement are inadequate and calls on the European Commission to examine them thoroughly in September, when Privacy Shield is due for its first annual review. Among the complaints: the lack of specific rules on automated decisions; the need for stricter guarantees for the independence and powers of the Ombudsman; the non-quorate status of the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight board; the lack of concrete assurances that the US agencies have established safeguards against bulk data collection; and the large number of companies that are not covered by the voluntary self-certification scheme.
EDRi: http://bit.ly/2oyt3yK
European Parliament: http://bit.ly/2p5biaO

Leaks identify US starting points for NAFTA renegotiations
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Canadian intellectual property law scholar Michael Geist reports that the leaked draft notice from the Trump Administration identifies 40 issues that will form the starting point for discussion when talks begin to renegotiate the North Atlantic Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Among these issues are intellectual property, privacy, and e-commerce rules that are very similar to the shelved Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement. Of particular concern are clauses limiting restrictions on data flows, criminal penalties for piracy, counterfeiting, and trade secret violations.
Geist (part 1): http://bit.ly/2o4COkh
Geist (part 2): http://bit.ly/2pt3tID

Investigation finds thousands of fake open access journals
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In a letter to Nature, Piotr Sorokowski, Emanuel Kulczycki, Agnieszka Sorokowska, and Katarzyna Pisanski, researchers at the University of Wroclaw, report on their investigation of fake open access journals. The researchers submitted a fake application for an editor position to a mix of 360 legitimate journals and suspected fakes; 48 accepted the application. The authors go on to comment that the number of fake "predatory journals" is increasing at an alarming rate and is roughly the same as genuine titles (10,000) and becoming an "organized industry". The situation presents a threat to the quality of scholarship in general and to the open access movement in particular. Elsewhere, Science magazine reports that six organizations, including Wikimedia, the Public Library of Science, and the open access journal eLife have launched the Initiative for Open Citations, which is partnering with 29 publishers (and counting) to enable anyone to access citation data from 14 million papers indexed by the Crossref collaboration to promote the sharing of scholarly information.
Nature: http://go.nature.com/2o4LOWD
Science: http://bit.ly/2oylY13

Google adds "Fact check" tag to news results
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Search Engine Journal reports that Google is expanding its Fact Check tag to search results and news articles worldwide. The tag means that a piece of content includes information that has been fact-checked by news publishers and fact-checking organizations. To be included in the scheme, publishers need to use the Schema.org ClaimReview markup on pages where public statements have been fact-checked. In October 2016, when Google first applied the tag to News in select countries, Poynter found ClaimReview was in use by fewer than ten domains. In addition, publishers must be algorithmically determined to be an authoritative source. The Guardian discusses similar efforts by Facebook that flags content as "disputed" and its efforts to educate the public on how to spot fake news.
Search Engine Journal: http://bit.ly/2o6kmIC
Poynter: http://bit.ly/2o68xSN
Guardian: http://bit.ly/2o6afnd

Hungary: Central European University under attack
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Bard College president Leon Botstein, UC Berkeley provost Carol Christ, and Columbia professor Jonathan Cole report in the Washington Post that the government, led by Prime Minister Viktor Orban, has introduced legislation attached to an anti-immigration bill that makes it illegal for the Soros-founded Central European University to operate as an American university. The bill also regulates the movement of students and faculty for "national security reasons". The three authors, all members of the CEU's Board of Trustees, call the move an "attack rooted in xenophobic nationalism and an anti-intellectual mistrust of the conduct of free inquiry, research, and teaching", and argue that allowing the CEU to fall under the control of the Hungarian government will cause all universities in Hungary to suffer. Politico provides further background.
Washington Post: http://wapo.st/2p5idRs
Politico: http://politi.co/2oXgz4z


FEATURES AND ANALYSIS
====================
For more features and analysis selected by the Program team, visit:
http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:oped/

We Robot
----------------------------------------------------------------------
On this page, We Robot provides links to the draft papers and video livestreams from this year's conference. Of particular note are the discussions of Rebecca Wexler's paper on the criminal justice system, where trade secrets may deny the accused access to the basis for decisions made about their cases; Kristen Thomasen's paper on feminist perspectives and drone regulation, which argues that framing the issues surrounding drones and privacy as one of physical safety for women ignores the larger social issue of information asymmetry; and Amanda Levandowski's paper arguing that copyright law exacerbates the problem of bias in AI by rendering much data unavailable for use in training such systems.
We Robot: http://bit.ly/2oXkFJR

Ten principles for responsible big data research
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article for the Public Library of Science Computational Biology, researchers from Data & Society led by Matthew Zook publish ten rules for responsible big data research. Among the principles: acknowledge that data are people and can do harm; guard against reidentification; consider the limitations of the data; and engage with broader consequences.
PloS: http://bit.ly/2psXkMB

Seeing beyond the hype in technology for human rights
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting at Open Democracy, Zara Rahman reports on a study undertaken by The Engine Room in 2016 to examine the risks inherent in technology adoption in the human rights sector. "Fail fast" isn't appropriate in a context where lives are at stake and where the core work of documentation changes slowly, she writes. Yet the pressure to adopt new technologies is very strong, not least from funders, who tend to respond favorably to applications that look innovative, while the crucial qualities needed for human rights work, however, are reliability and sustainability. Rahman explores the difficulties of choosing between open source and proprietary software, and notes that developers and trainers often are ignorant about the context in which their tools will be used.
Open Democracy: http://bit.ly/2oypet6

Rethinking trade agreements
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting, Susan Grant, director of consumer protection and privacy for the Consumer Federation of America and member of the Transatlantic Consumer Dialogue steering committee, reviews the recent public TACD annual forum. Contrary to the comments of former ambassador Stuart Eizenstat, a co-founder of TACD, Grant argues that TACD is not anti-trade but wants to improve both the process and the outcome of trade negotiations so that consumers benefit. In a paper launched at the forum, TACD outlines what it thinks should and should not be included in such negotiations.
TACD (Grant): http://bit.ly/2o61Xfk
TACD (paper): http://bit.ly/2p53FRV

RightsCon
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this Storify, APC follows this year's RightsCon, highlighting panels on algorithms, network neutrality, encryption, privacy, and surveillance. In a blog post, Advocacy Assembly offers a summary of the conference's journalism aspects. CDT's podcast features interviews with politicians and activists about their work in progress, including Dutch MEP Marietje Schaake, Access Now regional leads Wafa Ben-Hassine (Middle East and North Africa) and Javier Pallero (Latin America), EDRi executive director Joe McNamee, and Derechos Digitales director Maria Paz Canales.
Storify: http://bit.ly/2oyCwWB
Advocacy Assembly: http://bit.ly/2p7txcN
Soundcloud (CDT): http://bit.ly/2o67geD

East Africa: The state of internet freedom
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this report, Small Media and the Collaboration on International ICT Policy for East and Southern Africa (CIPESA), Defend Defenders, and Nairobi-based Strathmore University's Center for Intellectual Property and Information Technology Law assess the state of internet freedoms in Burundi, Rwanda, South Sudan, Tanzania, and Uganda against the principles enshrined in the African Declaration on Internet Rights and Freedoms. In each country, the researchers find that government policy is out of alignment with these core values. Human rights and internet freedom advocates need to continue pushing their governments to adjust their policies in the direction of greater transparency, better surveillance oversight, and legislating to protect privacy and data.
Small Media: http://bit.ly/2oXmuqo


***

DIARY
==============
To see more events recommended by the Information Program team, visit:
https://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:events/. If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

Robots Exhibition
----------------------------------------
February 8 - September 13
London, UK
The Science Museum's 2017 robots exhibition includes robotic artifacts over five centuries, from a 16th century mechanized monk to the latest research developments. Focusing on why they exist rather than on how they work, the exhibition explores the ways robots mirror humanity and the insights they offer into our ambitions, desires and position in a rapidly changing world.
http://bit.ly/2kpgPn2

Human Rights Watch Film Festival
----------------------------------------
March 6-June 18
London, UK; Chicago Illinois; Toronto, Canada; New York, NY
The 16 human rights documentaries included in this peripatetic festival highlight individuals and groups exhibiting courageous resilience in challenging times. Among the human rights topics represented are the integrity of the press; the experience of refugees seeking safety; and factory workers protesting chemical harms from their work in the Chinese electronics industry. Nicholas de Pencier's BLACK CODE, based on Ronald Deibert's book of the same name, follows members of Toronto-based Citizen Lab as they document civil society activism in Tibet, Syria, Brazil, and Pakistan.
http://bit.ly/2mbHEiW

TICTeC 2017
----------------------------------------
April 25-26, 2017
Florence, Italy
This will be the third mySociety conference on the impacts of civic technology.
http://bit.ly/2e5NifJ

2017 IFLA International News Media Conference
----------------------------------------
April 27-28, 2017
Reykjavik, Iceland
This conference will examine issues and challenges in collecting and preserving the news and making it available to users. Do access and preservation have different prerequisites? In addition, the conference will explore how news media is used and transformed by researchers and the public. Can we recognize variable user needs? Do we offer the most suitable APIs?
http://bit.ly/2gjYmu2

Creative Commons Global Summit
----------------------------------------
April 28-30, 2017
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
This event will gather a global community of technologists, academics, activists, creatives, and legal experts to work together on the expansion and growth of the commons, open knowledge, and free culture for all.
http://bit.ly/2cO3x0P

IFLA MetLib 2017
----------------------------------------
April 30-May 5, 2017
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
The 2017 program theme is "Partnerships: Creating a new vision for libraries". Among the subthemes will be discussions of how and why to use, form, and manage partnerships, management tools, and best practices.
http://bit.ly/2ghPOPp

OpenTech
----------------------------------------
May 13, 2017
London, UK
OpenTech 2017 is an informal, low cost, one-day conference on slightly different approaches to technology, experience and democracy. Talks by people who work on things that matter guarantee a day of thoughtful talks leading to conversations with friends.
http://bit.ly/2lmW53w

4th Africa Library Summit and 2nd AfLIA conference
----------------------------------------
May 14-20, 2017
Yaounde, Cameroon
Moved from Ethiopia to the site of the second bidder due to safety concerns, this conference co-locates the fourth Africa Library Sumit and the second African Library and Information Associations and Institutions conference.
http://bit.ly/2hsw64E

Citizen Science Conference 2017
----------------------------------------
May 17-20, 2017
St Paul, Minnesota
The biennial citizen science conference brings together a diverse group of researchers, practitioners, community organizations, and participants.
http://bit.ly/2jspOWl

Transparency Camp
----------------------------------------
May 22, 2017
Phoenix, Arizona
The Sunlight Foundation and the Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting, Galvanize, and the Arizona Institute for Digital Progress are teaming up to present Tcamp 2017, an un-conference that will bring together the government, developer and journalist communities to discuss and solve problems relating to making government data open and accessible to the public.
http://bit.ly/2oXkH4t

IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy
----------------------------------------
May 22-24, 2017
San Jose, California
The 38th annual meeting will present developments in computer security and electronic privacy, and for bringing together researchers and practitioners in the field.
http://bit.ly/2hsqUhj

Workshop on Technology and Consumer Protection
----------------------------------------
May 22-24, 2017
San Jose, California
Co-hosted with the IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy, ConPro will explore computer science topics with an impact on consumers. This workshop has a strong security and privacy slant, with an overall focus on ways in which computer science can prevent, detect, or address the potential for technology to deceive or unfairly harm consumers.
http://bit.ly/2fJ6ShN

Privacy Law Scholars
----------------------------------------
June 1-2
Berkeley, California
The tenth annual Privacy Law Scholars workshop will assemble a wide array of privacy law scholars and practitioners from around the world to discuss papers in progress. Scholars from many disciplines, including psychology, economics, sociology, philosophy, political science, computer science, and mathematics also participate.
http://bit.ly/2ln2Rq3

Personal Democracy Forum CEE 2017
----------------------------------------
June 8-9, 2017
New York, NY
The theme is PDF17 is "What We Do Now". Attendees will get connected, get inspired, learn with today's new and veteran organizers alike, and discover how what we do now can make all the difference.
http://bit.ly/2oaSCT5

Next Library Festival 2017
----------------------------------------
June 11-14, 2017
Aarhus, Denmark
Next Library 2017 will offer a "patchwork" of co-learning, co-creative, participatory, engaging, pluralistic and interactive meetings, and lots of parallel sessions, keynote speakers, wildcard sessions, demos/exhibitions, gaming, Networking Dinner Party, Get2Gether, Social un-conferences, alternative events and surprises.
http://bit.ly/2hHNt4W

CERN Workshop on Innovations in Scholarly Communication
----------------------------------------
June 21-23, 2017
Geneva, Switzerland
The organizers of the biennial CERN Workshop on Innovations in Scholarly Communication - OAI10 - include representatives from the Open Society Foundations, SPARC, PloS, CERN, UCL, and other academic institutions..
http://bit.ly/2jzXj6X

Data Power 2017
----------------------------------------
June 22-23, 2017
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
The Data Power 2017 conference asks: how can we reclaim some form of data-based power and autonomy, and advance data-based technological citizenship, while living in regimes of data power? Confirmed speakers include Helen Nissenbaum, Frank Pasquale, Stefania Milan, and Paul N. Edwards.
http://bit.ly/2p7GymW

Open Repositories 2017
----------------------------------------
June 26-30, 2017
Brisbane, Australia
The annual Open Repositories Conference brings together users and developers of open digital repository platforms from higher education, government, galleries, libraries, archives and museums. The Conference provides an interactive forum for delegates from around the world to come together and explore the global challenges and opportunities facing libraries and the broader scholarly information landscape.
http://bit.ly/2aOCiGp

Summer courses on privacy and international copyright laws
----------------------------------------
July 3-7, 2017
Amsterdam, Netherlands
These courses, run by the Institute for Information Law, are intensive post-graduate courses aimed to help professionals stay abreast of changing rules. The first, on privacy law and policy, focuses on recent developments in EU and US privacy law relating to the internet and online media. The second, on international copyright law, comprises nine seminars, each focused on one specific copyright issue.
http://bit.ly/2lmPgim

AI Now Symposium
----------------------------------------
Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA
July 10, 2017
The second annual symposium of the AI Now Initiative, led by Kate Crawford and Meredith Whittaker, will be held at the MIT Media Lab. AI Now works across disciplines to understand the social impact of AI.
http://bit.ly/2psXm70

Citizen Lab Summer Institute
----------------------------------------
July 12-14
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
This year's conference is organized around five research streams: Network Interference and Freedom of Expression Online, Surveillance and Counter Surveillance, Security and Privacy of Apps, Corporate Transparency and Public Accountability, and a special session on Information Controls and Armed Conflict.
http://bit.ly/2oaGQrQ

IFLA World Libraries and Information Congress
----------------------------------------
August 19-25, 2017
Wroclaw, Poland
The theme of the 83rd annual IFLA congress will be "Achieving a healthy future together: diverse and emerging roles for health information professionals".
http://bit.ly/2gErkVa

Privacy + Security Forum
----------------------------------------
October 4-6, 2017
Washington, DC
The conference breaks down the silos of security and privacy by bringing together leaders from both fields.
http://bit.ly/1PZhExo

Mozfest 2017
----------------------------------------
October 27-29, 2017
London, UK
https://ti.to/Mozilla/mozfest-2017/en
The world's leading festival for the open internet movement will feature influential thinkers from around the world to build, debate, and explore the future of a healthy internet.
http://bit.ly/2oaIXvK

***

Hear more from the Information Program!
================================
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Other possible:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/will-democracy-survive-big-data-and-artificial-intelligence/
http://www.theverge.com/2017/3/15/14935360/automation-robots-ai-manufacturing-future-sxsw-2017
News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week ending 24 March 2017
====================================================

The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF. Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

Our staff, advisers and major grantees tweet at http://bit.ly/13j5fjq. Current and former grantees featured in this issue: EFF, mySociety, Open Rights Group, Privacy International.


NEWS
=====
For breaking news stories, visit: http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:news/

Prospective trade deals recycle Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement clauses
----------------------------------------------------------------------
EFF reports that some of the proposals it and other civil society organizations opposed in the now-defunct Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement are being recycled into other international trade deals. EFF flags in particular the renegotiation of the North Atlantic Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and the Asian Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP). EFF advocates opening the negotiation process to meaningful consultation with users and civil society.
EFF: http://bit.ly/2niqD6k

Pakistan: Government demands social media block "blasphemous" content
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Dawn reports that Facebook is sending a delegation to Pakistan to attempt to reach a mutual understanding following hearings in a related case at the Islamabad High Court (IHC) that claims the dissemination of blasphemous content via social media is "hurting the religious sentiments of Muslims". The IHC has ordered the government to investigate online blasphemy. Dawn also reports that Minister of the Interior Chaudhry Nisar has threatened to block all social media websites containing blasphemous content. Past government bans have included Facebook (for two weeks in 2010) and YouTube (2012-2016).
Dawn (delegation): http://bit.ly/2mxAQwN
Dawn (threat): http://bit.ly/2mxKKi3

US: "Smart" vibrator manufacturer settles privacy case
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The Guardian reports that We-Vibe, the maker of a line of Bluetooth-enabled vibrators that can be paired with a remote control app, has agreed a $3.75 million class action settlement after the company was accused of collecting data on when and how customers used its products. The lawsuit, which was filed in an Illinois federal court, alleged that the company collected detailed and personally identifiable information; about 300,000 people bought the vibrators and about a third of those paired them with the app. The security flaws were first revealed by researchers at Defcon 2016.
Guardian: http://bit.ly/2ntkPaq

Advertiser pressure mounts on Google over extremist material
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The Guardian reports that numerous major companies such as Vodafone, Sky, several banks, and the Guardian itself are either pulling their ads from Google and its YouTube subsidiary site or considering doing so. The issue: the appearance of their ads in extremist videos on YouTube. Senior Google executives were summoned to the UK's Cabinet Office last week over similar concerns. The Guardian also reports that internet analysts estimate that extremists and hate preachers have netted at least £250,000 from such advertising with $149,000 accruing to Google in commissions. This is not a new problem; the Guardian first covered it in 2012. Separately, Multiplex reports that Google apparently authorized the placement of an ad for the new Disney movie Beauty and the Beast into the voice-powered Google Home device, which included the movie in its daily news summary, and compares the move to earlier advertising mistakes.
Guardian (advertisers): http://bit.ly/2nO5Usm
Guardian (money): http://bit.ly/2nikYgt
Guardian (2012): http://bit.ly/2mxxKZO
Multiplex: http://bit.ly/2mxJbjW

Kenya: Communications surveillance practices
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Privacy International reports that the Kenyan National Intelligence Service has direct access to communications networks across Kenya and is sharing the data it collects with the police forces essentially without oversight and outside the procedures required by Kenyan law. PI's newly-published investigation of the techniques, tools and culture of Kenyan police and intelligence agencies' communications surveillance practices finds that intercepted content and data are being used to facilitate gross human rights abuses. The consequences include eroded trust and marred anti-terrorism operations. PI calls for reform in this election year.
PI: http://bit.ly/2n02Nd1

Scotland: Government drops university identity register
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The Open Rights Group reports that the Scottish government has dropped plans to use the National Health Service central register as the basis for a national identity register. ORG goes on to call for Scotland to drop its poorly-documented identity system, which comprises a unique citizen reference number assigned to each citizen at birth and a national entitlement card, which is run by the private Improvement Service and which gives citizens access to government services such as bus passes, student service cards, and libraries.
ORG: http://bit.ly/2nO37iM

Paywalls damage public health
----------------------------------------------------------------------
At Medium, Lauren Maggio, Juan Pablo Alperin, Laura Moorhead, and John Willinsky report their finding that over 60% of the journal articles discussed in news stories published in 2016 were locked behind paywalls with no free PDF available on the authors' site. The typical fees of $30 to $50 an article, they argue, present too much of a barrier for the general public and the 12-month embargo allowed by the National Institutes of Health is too long. Much of this research is taxpayer-financed, and public health is being damaged by this lack of access to the evidence base.
Medium: http://bit.ly/2nOcAH6


FEATURES AND ANALYSIS
====================
For more features and analysis selected by the Program team, visit:
http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:oped/

Three challenges for the web
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this posting, Tim Berners-Lee highlights three problems that he finds critical for the web: 1) our loss of control over our personal data; 2) the ease of spreading misinformation; and 3) the need for transparency about political online advertising. Working on these forms part of the World Wide Web Foundation's new five-year strategy; Berners-Lee calls for help in building "the web we want".
Web Foundation: http://bit.ly/2mZIJHL

Cataloguing the world's politicians
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting, mySociety describes progress made by its EveryPolitician project, which by now has collected data on over 72,000 politicians from 233 countries. They go on to explain the decisions they've made in collecting the data and discuss some early projects making use of the data. The Represent.me project, for example, has built a platform for gathering opinions and votes that can be shared with politicians and constituency MPs.
mySociety: http://bit.ly/2nd1VCv

Interview with SocArXiv founder Philip Cohen
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting, Richard Poynder interviews Philip Cohen, the founder of the SocArXiv social sciences pre-print server. Since its soft launch last summer, the server has amassed over 800 papers; it will hold its first conference in October. In the near term, Cohen intends for SocArXiv to allow new research to reach readers in a timely fashion while preserving the ability to publish in regular journals. Longer-term, he hopes to participate in the movement to build a new and better form of scholarly communications system.
Poynder: http://bit.ly/2nisnfE

Interview with Brazilian TRIPS negotiator Celso Amorim
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this interview at Intellectual Property Watch, William New asks Brazilian minister Celso Amorim to recount his part in negotiating to secure flexibilities for developing countries in the 1994 WTO Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS). He also negotiated the landmark 2001 Doha Declaration on TRIPS and Public Health. During that time, the climate changed dramatically, first because of the advent of HIV/AIDS and then due to 9/11. Amorim worries that the new US administration will pursue unilateral sanctions, fragmenting the genuinely worldwide agreements of the past.
IP Watch: http://bit.ly/2mxRGeY

The Rise of the Weaponized Propaganda Machine
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this piece at Medium, Berit Anderson and Brett Hovath discuss automated propaganda in global politics. Beginning with an outline of Cambridge Analytica's role in the 2016 US presidential election and its influence on Trump's ongoing policy decisions, the authors go on to examine how the various technical pieces work: data, engagement scripts, networking, and bots. Future elections, Anderson and Horvath argue, will be battles of automated behavior change. Buzzfeed offers a skeptical take on some of the claims regarding the use of behavioral targeting during the US elections. Scientific American asks whether democracy can survive these technologies. The price of personalized information, the authors write, is collective and local decision-making. Calling top-down, centralized control a solution of the past, they suggest ten principles for avoiding totalitarianism.
Medium: http://bit.ly/2nJroGt
Buzzfeed: http://bzfd.it/2nPXuB1
Scientific American: http://bit.ly/2mxMgkf

The technology industry at South by Southwest
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this Wired article, Issie Lapowsky finds the technology industry rethinking itself at the annual Austin, Texas South by Southwest (SXSW) festival. The BBC interviews Bishop Paul Tighe, who this year became the first representative sent to SXSW by the Vatican to learn more about the digital world and to promote human values. At The Verge, Nick Statt complains that SXSW is failing to tackle hard questions. Statt also summarizes the SXSW talk by roboticist Matt Rendall, who argued that the US's failure to invest in industrial robotics may cause the country to lose out on the next industrial revolution.
Wired: http://bit.ly/2ntB47j
BBC: http://bbc.in/2ntsEgl
Verge (SXSW): http://bit.ly/2ncXlnY
Vere (investment): http://bit.ly/2nJkDo0

Palantir, Peter Thiel, Big Data, and the DHS
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting, Edward Hasbrouck discusses recent protests at Palantir, which have seen technology industry employees object to the use of technical tools to assist the Department of Homeland Security to implement the exclusionary policies of the Trump administration. Hasbrouck explains what is known about the tools Palantir is building and their consequences when put to use.
Hasbrouck: http://bit.ly/2ntyRc0


***

DIARY
==============
To see more events recommended by the Information Program team, visit:
https://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:events/. If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

Robots Exhibition
----------------------------------------
February 8 - September 13
London, UK
The Science Museum's 2017 robots exhibition includes robotic artifacts over five centuries, from a 16th century mechanized monk to the latest research developments. Focusing on why they exist rather than on how they work, the exhibition explores the ways robots mirror humanity and the insights they offer into our ambitions, desires and position in a rapidly changing world.
http://bit.ly/2kpgPn2

Human Rights Watch Film Festival
----------------------------------------
March 6-June 18
London, UK; Chicago Illinois; Toronto, Canada; New York, NY
The 16 human rights documentaries included in this peripatetic festival highlight individuals and groups exhibiting courageous resilience in challenging times. Among the human rights topics represented are the integrity of the press; the experience of refugees seeking safety; and factory workers protesting chemical harms from their work in the Chinese electronics industry. Nicholas de Pencier's BLACK CODE, based on Ronald Deibert's book of the same name, follows members of Toronto-based Citizen Lab as they document civil society activism in Tibet, Syria, Brazil, and Pakistan.
http://bit.ly/2mbHEiW

Rightscon 2017
----------------------------------------
March 29-31, 2017
Brussels, Belgium
RightsCon will tackle the most pressing issues at the intersection of technology and human rights. Session proposals are being accepted until November 25, 2016.
http://bit.ly/I2ZAUZ

We Robot
----------------------------------------
March 31-April 1, 2017
New Haven, Connecticut
The sixth annual We Robot will be held at Yale Law School and will focus on the coming legal and policy conflicts as robots and AI become part of daily life.
http://bit.ly/2fVF2SI

ILIDE 2017
----------------------------------------
April 3-5, 2017
Jasna, Slovakia
This year's Innovative Library in the Digital Era conference will discuss repositories and research data archiving, open science, digital humanities and digital scholarship.
http://bit.ly/2luJppU

OpenAIRE Workshop
----------------------------------------
April 4, 2017
Barcelona, Spain
As an adjunct to the RDA plenary, the Research and Data Alliance will hold a workshop on legal issues in open research data.
http://bit.ly/2moqe1r

OER 17
----------------------------------------
April 5-6, 2017
London, UK
This year's OER will present an opportunity for open practitioners, activists, educators, and policy makers to come together to reflect on 'The Politics of Open'. Up for discussion are questions such as: What are our current key challenges and strengths - locally, nationally, and internationally? What are our priorities - in terms of political governance, organisational and personal politics? What are the changes that we want to effect together? The conference will be chaired by social and educational technologist and Wikimedia UK Trustee Josie Fraser, and Alek Tarkowski, Director of Centrum Cyfrowe, co-founder and coordinator of Creative Commons Poland.
http://bit.ly/2k5V7bC

Research Data Alliance Plenary
----------------------------------------
April 5-7, 2017
Barcelona, Spain
The main theme for the 9th Research Data Alliance plenary meeting, organised by the Barcelona Supercomputing Center-Centro Nacional de Supercomputación and supported by RDA Europe, will be Data Infrastructures for Open Science.
http://bit.ly/2lGBp6U

Personal Democracy Forum CEE 2017
----------------------------------------
April 6-7
Gdansk, Poland
The 5th edition of Personal Democracy Forum will serve as a platform for exchanging ideas and experiences for people using new technologies to work for civic participation and transparency in public life in Central and Eastern Europe.
http://bit.ly/2j7q7HT

TICTeC 2017
----------------------------------------
April 25-26, 2017
Florence, Italy
This will be the third mySociety conference on the impacts of civic technology.
http://bit.ly/2e5NifJ

2017 IFLA International News Media Conference
----------------------------------------
April 27-28, 2017
Reykjavik, Iceland
This conference will examine issues and challenges in collecting and preserving the news and making it available to users. Do access and preservation have different prerequisites? In addition, the conference will explore how news media is used and transformed by researchers and the public. Can we recognize variable user needs? Do we offer the most suitable APIs?
http://bit.ly/2gjYmu2

Creative Commons Global Summit
----------------------------------------
April 28-30, 2017
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
This event will gather a global community of technologists, academics, activists, creatives, and legal experts to work together on the expansion and growth of the commons, open knowledge, and free culture for all.
http://bit.ly/2cO3x0P

IFLA MetLib 2017
----------------------------------------
April 30-May 5, 2017
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
The 2017 program theme is "Partnerships: Creating a new vision for libraries". Among the subthemes will be discussions of how and why to use, form, and manage partnerships, management tools, and best practices.
http://bit.ly/2ghPOPp

OpenTech
----------------------------------------
May 13, 2017
London, UK
OpenTech 2017 is an informal, low cost, one-day conference on slightly different approaches to technology, experience and democracy. Talks by people who work on things that matter guarantee a day of thoughtful talks leading to conversations with friends.
http://bit.ly/2lmW53w

4th Africa Library Summit and 2nd AfLIA conference
----------------------------------------
May 14-20, 2017
Yaounde, Cameroon
Moved from Ethiopia to the site of the second bidder due to safety concerns, this conference co-locates the fourth Africa Library Sumit and the second African Library and Information Associations and Institutions conference.
http://bit.ly/2hsw64E

Citizen Science Conference 2017
----------------------------------------
May 17-20, 2017
St Paul, Minnesota
The biennial citizen science conference brings together a diverse group of researchers, practitioners, community organizations, and participants.
http://bit.ly/2jspOWl

IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy
----------------------------------------
May 22-24, 2017
San Jose, California
The 38th annual meeting will present developments in computer security and electronic privacy, and for bringing together researchers and practitioners in the field.
http://bit.ly/2hsqUhj

Workshop on Technology and Consumer Protection
----------------------------------------
May 22-24, 2017
San Jose, California
Co-hosted with the IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy, ConPro will explore computer science topics with an impact on consumers. This workshop has a strong security and privacy slant, with an overall focus on ways in which computer science can prevent, detect, or address the potential for technology to deceive or unfairly harm consumers.
http://bit.ly/2fJ6ShN

Privacy Law Scholars
----------------------------------------
June 1-2
Berkeley, California
The tenth annual Privacy Law Scholars workshop will assemble a wide array of privacy law scholars and practitioners from around the world to discuss papers in progress. Scholars from many disciplines, including psychology, economics, sociology, philosophy, political science, computer science, and mathematics also participate.
http://bit.ly/2ln2Rq3

Personal Democracy Forum CEE 2017
----------------------------------------
June 8-9, 2017
New York, NY
The theme is PDF17 is "What We Do Now". Attendees will get connected, get inspired, learn with today's new and veteran organizers alike, and discover how what we do now can make all the difference.
http://bit.ly/2oaSCT5

Next Library Festival 2017
----------------------------------------
June 11-14, 2017
Aarhus, Denmark
Next Library 2017 will offer a "patchwork" of co-learning, co-creative, participatory, engaging, pluralistic and interactive meetings, and lots of parallel sessions, keynote speakers, wildcard sessions, demos/exhibitions, gaming, Networking Dinner Party, Get2Gether, Social un-conferences, alternative events and surprises.
http://bit.ly/2hHNt4W

CERN Workshop on Innovations in Scholarly Communication
----------------------------------------
June 21-23, 2017
Geneva, Switzerland
The organizers of the biennial CERN Workshop on Innovations in Scholarly Communication - OAI10 - include representatives from the Open Society Foundations, SPARC, PloS, CERN, UCL, and other academic institutions..
http://bit.ly/2jzXj6X

Open Repositories 2017
----------------------------------------
June 26-30, 2017
Brisbane, Australia
The annual Open Repositories Conference brings together users and developers of open digital repository platforms from higher education, government, galleries, libraries, archives and museums. The Conference provides an interactive forum for delegates from around the world to come together and explore the global challenges and opportunities facing libraries and the broader scholarly information landscape.
http://bit.ly/2aOCiGp

Summer courses on privacy and international copyright laws
----------------------------------------
July 3-7, 2017
Amsterdam, Netherlands
These courses, run by the Institute for Information Law, are intensive post-graduate courses aimed to help professionals stay abreast of changing rules. The first, on privacy law and policy, focuses on recent developments in EU and US privacy law relating to the internet and online media. The second, on international copyright law, comprises nine seminars, each focused on one specific copyright issue.
http://bit.ly/2lmPgim

Citizen Lab Summer Institute
----------------------------------------
July 12-14
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
This year's conference is organized around five research streams: Network Interference and Freedom of Expression Online, Surveillance and Counter Surveillance, Security and Privacy of Apps, Corporate Transparency and Public Accountability, and a special session on Information Controls and Armed Conflict.
http://bit.ly/2oaGQrQ

IFLA World Libraries and Information Congress
----------------------------------------
August 19-25, 2017
Wroclaw, Poland
The theme of the 83rd annual IFLA congress will be "Achieving a healthy future together: diverse and emerging roles for health information professionals".
http://bit.ly/2gErkVa

Privacy + Security Forum
----------------------------------------
October 4-6, 2017
Washington, DC
The conference breaks down the silos of security and privacy by bringing together leaders from both fields.
http://bit.ly/1PZhExo

Mozfest 2017
----------------------------------------
October 27-29, 2017
London, UK
https://ti.to/Mozilla/mozfest-2017/en
The world's leading festival for the open internet movement will feature influential thinkers from around the world to build, debate, and explore the future of a healthy internet.
http://bit.ly/2oaIXvK

***

Hear more from the Information Program!
================================
If you want to hear more from the Information Program team each week, consider subscribing to our shared bookmarks on delicious using this RSS feed:
http://feeds.pinboard.in/rss/secret:95194ab804ccccac713b/u:osi_info_program/

You can also read more about our work on the Open Society Foundations website: http://www.opensocietyfoundations.org/about/programs/information-program


Hear less from the Information Program!
================================
If you wish to unsubscribe from this weekly digest, please send an email with the subject line "Unsubscribe" to info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/

News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week ending 24 February 2017
====================================================
The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF. Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

Our staff, advisers and major grantees tweet at http://bit.ly/13j5fjq. Current and former grantees featured in this issue: Citizen Lab, EDRi, EFF, La Quadrature du Net.

NEWS
=====
For breaking news stories, visit: http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:news/

EU passes Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA)
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The BBC reports that despite protests the European Parliament has passed the Canada-EU trade agreement CETA by 408 votes to 254. Some parts of the deal, such as tariff reduction, will now come into force; others, such as the court system for settling investor-state disputes, will require ratification by EU member states. Before the vote, La Quadrature du Net called on MEPs to dump the agreement because "it endangers our freedoms and fundamental rights".BBC: http://bbc.in/2lcJjRy
LQDN: http://bit.ly/2moVLxA

US: Immigration proposes to search social media profiles
----------------------------------------------------------------------
At Access Now, Drew Mitnick reports that US Secretary of Homeland Security John Kelly has told members of the US Congress that the Trump administration is considering requiring visa applicants from the seven countries included in President Donald Trump's travel ban - Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen - to disclose passwords for their social media accounts and personal devices as part of enhanced screening. Mitnick notes that the move would not only violate the human rights of the travelers, but also those of any friends and relatives in their social graph, and warns of potential security hazards such as continued monitoring via malware. EFF supplies additional background to the proposal and is collecting stories of experiences at the border. At the Freedom to Tinker blog, Dan Wallach suggests technical counter-measures.
Access Now: http://bit.ly/2lOSFq1
EFF: http://bit.ly/2luQZAX
Freedom to Tinker: http://bit.ly/2l3ANTX

Facebook's AI searches images by their contents
----------------------------------------------------------------------
At TechCrunch, John Mannes reports that Facebook's Lumos computer vision platform can search photographs using terms related to the objects appearing in them rather than via metadata tags users apply to the images when they're uploaded. The system is based on a deep neural network classifier that has been trained on tens of millions of the billions of images stored on the service. Mannes expects Facebook to expand Lumos to its growing store of videos, and to use it to improve its ad targeting and fight spam.
TechCrunch: http://tcrn.ch/2mbGvYG

Germany: Telecommunications watchdog order My Friend Cayla dolls destroyed
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The New York Times reports that the German Federal Network Agency, the country's telecommunications watchdog, has classified the "smart doll" My Friend Cayla as an "illegal espionage apparatus" and is encouraging parents to destroy or deactivate it. The concern is that it violates the law against manufacturing, selling, or possessing surveillance devices disguised as another object, and that hackers could exploit insecure Bluetooth connections to record private conversations. Mattel's competing Hello Barbie is not sold in Germany. The dolls are also controversial in the US, where EPIC has filed a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission and sparked a Congressional investigation, and in Norway, where last year the Norwegian Consumer Council found that the doll failed to safeguard basic consumer rights, security, and privacy.
NY Times: http://nyti.ms/2mbHUih
EPIC (PDF): http://bit.ly/2lzrQUg
NCC: http://bit.ly/2lOKJVI


Kenya, Mexico: Citizens suspect state manipulation on Twitter
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Global Voices reports that both the Kenyan and Mexican governments are suspected of emulating China and Venezuela in using Twitter to try to change national opinion. In Kenya, public support for a nationwide strike by doctors protesting the government's failure to honor the collective bargaining agreement has been accompanied by social media messages using hashtags such as #greedydoctors. Local bloggers have found a strong correlation between the accounts posting these messages and those posting other professional-government messages. In Mexico, data scientists at the Jesuit University of Guadajara linked disruptions of public protests to accounts previously identified as bots or trolls that harassed journalists and social activists. For example, Twitter streams using the hashtag #gasolinazo to protest higher gasoline prices have been disrupted with others bearing the hashtag #SaqueaUnWalmart ("loot a Walmart") and false images of people rioting. Put together with other analyses by Citizen Lab, Global Voices believes these developments suggest an increasingly threatening environment for citizen advocates in Mexico.
Global Voices: http://bit.ly/2lzpyUZ


FEATURES AND ANALYSIS
====================
For more features and analysis selected by the Program team, visit:
http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:oped/

Minority languages and social media
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this posting at Global Voices, Derek Lackaff examines the difficulty of adapting computer systems for local and minority languages, focusing in particularly on Irish Gaelic but also touching on Icelandic, Frisian, and Lakota. The shift to mobile has made typing these languages more difficult due to changes in technology (predictive text, software keyboards), and the multicultural nature of social media audiences generally favors the use of majority languages. Lackaff argues that the pressures of globalization and assimilation are endangering linguistic and cultural diversity.
Global Voices: http://bit.ly/2lzCIS8

Canada: Privacy in the age of Trump
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this video clip at TVO, University of Ottawa law professor Michael Geist discusses the consequences for Canadian privacy of recent US moves such as the executive order issued by President Donald Trump that rolled back protection for non-US citizens under the Privacy Act. Geist suggests that the country's long-standing commitment to human rights and the country's privacy laws may require the Canadian intelligence agencies to cease sharing data with their US counterparts. While noting the difficulties inherent in annoying the country's closest neighbor and largest trading partner, he urges the Canadian Privacy Commissioner to review the situation.
TVP: http://bit.ly/2lzq0Tg

Theft: A History of Music
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this graphical book published by Duke University and available for free download as a PDF under a Creative Commons license, James Boyle, Jennifer Jenkins, and Keith Aoki tell an alternative history of the last 2,000 years of music by focusing on recurring attempts to restrict borrowing and cultural exchange. The authors identify a variety of reasons behind these restrictions as the technology of music changes.
Duke: http://bit.ly/2moV1sq

Big data, elections, and Cambridge Analytica
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this Bloomberg column, mathematician Cathy O'Neil dissects claims that UK firm Cambridge Analytica's big data-fueled psychological analytics gave the winning side the edge in both the election of US President Donald Trump and the UK's vote to leave the EU - see, for example, Berit Anderson's discussion of the company's "automated propaganda" at Medium. Although O'Neil doubts that big data made the difference in Trump's case - not least because it's likely the Clinton campaign had more data - she notes the dangers inherent in the asymmetry of information represented by the new, highly-tailored generation of political ads. This has been a long-running theme for the Center for Digital Democracy, as in a recent blog posting, where CDD's Yewande Ogunkoya details the inner workings of the "commercial surveillance system". At Medium, Paul-Olivier Dehaye provides a quick guide to requesting your data from Cambridge Analytica.
Bloomberg: http://bloom.bg/2mgzcvM
Medium (Anderson): http://bit.ly/2mbIqwJ
CDD: http://bit.ly/2luOn6j
Medium (Dehaye): http://bit.ly/2kQFuVY

Scoping the algorithmic age
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting, primary researchers Lee Rainie and Janna Anderson summarize Pew Research Center's new report on algorithmic transparency "Code-Dependent: Pros and Cons of the Algorithm Age". The researchers conducted a survey of 1,302 technology experts, scholars, corporate practitioners, and government leaders, many of whom are quoted in the report. Seven consistent themes emerged: algorithms will continue to spread; there will be many benefits; the loss of human input is creating a flawed, logic-driven society; algorithm-driven systems are biased; algorithmic categorizations deepen divides; unemployment will rise; there is a growing need for algorithmic literacy, transparency, and oversight.
Pew: http://pewrsr.ch/2ld4S4a

Estimating OER savings
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting, Open Oregon Educational Resources explains the thinking behind the commonly-used estimated savings from OER adoption of $100 per student. The article compares several approaches and studies, taking into account variations in textbook cost in different fields, differing levels of enrollment, and local bookstore prices.
Open Oregon: http://bit.ly/2mgicpk

Biopolitical art
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this posting at e-flux conversations, the artist Heather Dewey-Hagborg discusses her series of projects on mass biological surveillance. Stranger Visions explored what can be learned about individuals from the artifacts we shed; DNA Spoofing considers how to be anonymous in an era of genetic surveillance; Radical Love is about forced invisibility. Dewey-Hagborg concludes by arguing for "biopolitical art" that exposes and questions power structures.
e-flux: http://bit.ly/2mp2kA3

***

DIARY
==============
To see more events recommended by the Information Program team, visit:
https://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:events/. If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

Robots Exhibition
----------------------------------------
February 8 - September 13
London, UK
The Science Museum's 2017 robots exhibition includes robotic artifacts over five centuries, from a 16th century mechanized monk to the latest research developments. Focusing on why they exist rather than on how they work, the exhibition explores the ways robots mirror humanity and the insights they offer into our ambitions, desires and position in a rapidly changing world.
http://bit.ly/2kpgPn2

3D/DC
----------------------------------------
March 2, 2017
Washington, DC, USA
The sixth 3D printing policy event will feature a series of panels on 3D printing and the human body; extreme applications of 3D printing; women in the 3D printing industry; 3D printing and the future of education; and the maker movement in the new administration.
http://bit.ly/2mpgtNE

Internet Freedom Festival
----------------------------------------
March 6-10, 2017
Valencia, Spain
The Internet Freedom Festival gathers the community keeping the Internet open and uncensored for a week of free-form multidisciplinary collaboration intended to help groups achieve their goals. Attendance is free and open to the public.
http://bit.ly/2dI8EV1

Open Education Global 2017
----------------------------------------
March 8-10, 2017
Cape Town, South Africa
This year marks several important milestones in Open Education, including the 15-year anniversary of the term "Open Educational Resources" and the five-year anniversary of the Paris OER Declaration. For those who remember the start of the movement, this conference will provide the opportunity to celebrate and reflect on these and other achievements, reconnect with colleagues and friends, and learn about new ideas and initiatives.
http://bit.ly/2jUcqJp

Human Rights Watch Film Festival
----------------------------------------
March 6-June 18
London, UK; Chicago Illinois; Toronto, Canada; New York, NY
The 16 human rights documentaries included in this peripatetic festival highlight individuals and groups exhibiting courageous resilience in challenging times. Among the human rights topics represented are the integrity of the press; the experience of refugees seeking safety; and factory workers protesting chemical harms from their work in the Chinese electronics industry. Nicholas de Pencier's BLACK CODE, based on Ronald Deibert's book of the same name, follows members of Toronto-based Citizen Lab as they document civil society activism in Tibet, Syria, Brazil, and Pakistan.
http://bit.ly/2mbHEiW

17th TACD Multi-Stakeholder Forum
----------------------------------------
March 21, 2017
Washington, DC
This year's TACD Multi-stakeholder Forum, titled "A consumer agenda for transatlantic markets: safeguarding protections and making progress in times of political change", will bring together participants representing civil society, academics, researchers, as well government, legislators , regulatory authorities and business on both sides of the Atlantic to discuss a pro-consumer agenda for transatlantic markets.
http://bit.ly/2lmVX42

B13
----------------------------------------
March 21-22, 2017
Berlin, Germany
The 13th Berlin Open Access conference will provide a networking and reviewing opportunity in the context of the OA2020 initiative, a proposal for a large-scale transition to open access. Berlin 13 will aim to strengthen the international network and share experience of various stakeholder groups.
http://bit.ly/2lJxFk8

Rightscon 2017
----------------------------------------
March 29-31, 2017
Brussels, Belgium
RightsCon will tackle the most pressing issues at the intersection of technology and human rights. Session proposals are being accepted until November 25, 2016.
http://bit.ly/I2ZAUZ

We Robot
----------------------------------------
March 31-April 1, 2017
New Haven, Connecticut
The sixth annual We Robot will be held at Yale Law School and will focus on the coming legal and policy conflicts as robots and AI become part of daily life.
http://bit.ly/2fVF2SI

ILIDE 2017
----------------------------------------
April 3-5, 2017
Jasna, Slovakia
This year's Innovative Library in the Digital Era conference will discuss repositories and research data archiving, open science, digital humanities and digital scholarship.
http://bit.ly/2luJppU

OER 17
----------------------------------------
April 5-6, 2017
London, UK
This year's OER will present an opportunity for open practitioners, activists, educators, and policy makers to come together to reflect on 'The Politics of Open'. Up for discussion are questions such as: What are our current key challenges and strengths - locally, nationally, and internationally? What are our priorities - in terms of political governance, organisational and personal politics? What are the changes that we want to effect together? The conference will be chaired by social and educational technologist and Wikimedia UK Trustee Josie Fraser, and Alek Tarkowski, Director of Centrum Cyfrowe, co-founder and coordinator of Creative Commons Poland.
http://bit.ly/2k5V7bC

Personal Democracy Forum 2017
----------------------------------------
April 6-7
Gdansk, Poland
The 5th edition of Personal Democracy Forum will serve as a platform for exchanging ideas and experiences for people using new technologies to work for civic participation and transparency in public life in Central and Eastern Europe.
http://bit.ly/2j7q7HT

TICTeC 2017
----------------------------------------
April 25-26, 2017
Florence, Italy
This will be the third mySociety conference on the impacts of civic technology.
http://bit.ly/2e5NifJ

2017 IFLA International News Media Conference
----------------------------------------
April 27-28, 2017
Reykjavik, Iceland
This conference will examine issues and challenges in collecting and preserving the news and making it available to users. Do access and preservation have different prerequisites? In addition, the conference will explore how news media is used and transformed by researchers and the public. Can we recognize variable user needs? Do we offer the most suitable APIs?
http://bit.ly/2gjYmu2

Creative Commons Global Summit
----------------------------------------
April 28-30, 2017
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
This event will gather a global community of technologists, academics, activists, creatives, and legal experts to work together on the expansion and growth of the commons, open knowledge, and free culture for all.
http://bit.ly/2cO3x0P

IFLA MetLib 2017
----------------------------------------
April 30-May 5, 2017
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
The 2017 programme theme is "Partnerships: Creating a new vision for libraries". Among the subthemes will be discussions of how and why to use, form, and manage partnerships, management tools, and best practices.
http://bit.ly/2ghPOPp

OpenTech
----------------------------------------
May 13, 2017
London, UK
OpenTech 2017 is an informal, low cost, one-day conference on slightly different approaches to technology, experience and democracy. Talks by people who work on things that matter guarantees a day of thoughtful talks leading to conversations with friends.
http://bit.ly/2lmW53w

4th Africa Library Summit and 2nd AfLIA conference
----------------------------------------
May 14-20, 2017
Yaounde, Cameroon
Moved from Ethiopia to the site of the second bidder due to safety concerns, this conference co-locates the fourth Africa Library Sumit and the second African Library and Information Associations and Institutions conference.
http://bit.ly/2hsw64E

Citizen Science Conference 2017
----------------------------------------
May 17-20, 2017
St Paul, Minnesota
The biennial citizen science conference brings together a diverse group of researchers, practitioners, community organizations, and participants.
http://bit.ly/2jspOWl

IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy
----------------------------------------
May 22-24, 2017
San Jose, California
The 38th annual meeting will present developments in computer security and electronic privacy, and for bringing together researchers and practitioners in the field.
http://bit.ly/2hsqUhj

Workshop on Technology and Consumer Protection
----------------------------------------
May 22-24, 2017
San Jose, California
Co-hosted with the IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy, ConPro will explore computer science topics with an impact on consumers. This workshop has a strong security and privacy slant, with an overall focus on ways in which computer science can prevent, detect, or address the potential for technology to deceive or unfairly harm consumers.
http://bit.ly/2fJ6ShN

Privacy Law Scholars
----------------------------------------
June 1-2
Berkeley, California
The tenth annual Privacy Law Scholars workshop will assemble a wide array of privacy law scholars and practitioners from around the world to discuss papers in progress. Scholars from many disciplines, including psychology, economics, sociology, philosophy, political science, computer science, and mathematics also participate.
http://bit.ly/2ln2Rq3

Next Library Festival 2017
----------------------------------------
June 11-14, 2017
Aarhus, Denmark
Next Library 2017 will offer a "patchwork" of co-learning, co-creative, participatory, engaging, pluralistic and interactive meetings, and lots of parallel sessions, keynote speakers, wildcard sessions, demos/exhibitions, gaming, Networking Dinner Party, Get2Gether, Social un-conferences, alternative events and surprises.
http://bit.ly/2hHNt4W

CERN Workshop on Innovations in Scholarly Communication
----------------------------------------
June 21-23, 2017
Geneva, Switzerland
The organizers of the biennial CERN Workshop on Innovations in Scholarly Communication - OAI10 - include representatives from the Open Society Foundations, SPARC, PloS, CERN, UCL, and other academic institutions..
http://bit.ly/2jzXj6X

Open Repositories 2017
----------------------------------------
June 26-30, 2017
Brisbane, Australia
The annual Open Repositories Conference brings together users and developers of open digital repository platforms from higher education, government, galleries, libraries, archives and museums. The Conference provides an interactive forum for delegates from around the world to come together and explore the global challenges and opportunities facing libraries and the broader scholarly information landscape.
http://bit.ly/2aOCiGp

Summer courses on privacy and international copyright laws
----------------------------------------
July 3-7, 2017
Amsterdam, Netherlands
These courses, run by the Institute for Information Law, are intensive post-graduate courses aimed to help professionals stay abreast of changing rules. The first, on privacy law and policy, focuses on recent developments in EU and US privacy law relating to the internet and online media. The second, on international copyright law, comprises nine seminars, each focused on one specific copyright issue.
http://bit.ly/2lmPgim

IFLA World Libraries and Information Congress
----------------------------------------
August 19-25, 2017
Wroclaw, Poland
The theme of the 83rd annual IFLA congress will be "Achieving a healthy future together: diverse and emerging roles for health information professionals".
http://bit.ly/2gErkVa

Privacy + Security Forum
----------------------------------------
October 4-6, 2017
Washington, DC
The conference breaks down the silos of security and privacy by bringing together leaders from both fields.
http://bit.ly/1PZhExo

***

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================================
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News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week ending 10 February 2017
====================================================
The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF. Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

Our staff, advisers and major grantees tweet at http://bit.ly/13j5fjq. Current and former grantees featured in this issue: Citizen Lab, EFF, Europe v. Facebook, IFLA .

PROGRAM NEWS
===========
The Networked Economics program of the International Development Research Centre (IDRC) has issued a call to established research organizations for a pilot program of four two-year pilot projects to strengthen cyber policy centers in eligible low, middle, or upper-middle income countries in the following regions: North of Sahara, South of Sahara, Middle East, South Asia, South East Asia, Latin America.
http://bit.ly/2k6xOta


NEWS
=====
For breaking news stories, visit: http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:news/

Trump executive order causes debate on Privacy Shield
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Privacy Law Blog reports that US President Donald Trump's Executive Order 13768, "Enhancing Public Safety in the Interior of the United States", has caused some discussion within the privacy community about its effect on the EU-US Privacy Shield agreement, which allows the transfer of personal data about EU citizens to the US, which lacks a comparable data protection regime. The conclusion: Privacy Shield stands because the agreement rests on redress promised by the Judicial Redress Act (2015), and executive orders cannot overturn legislation passed by Congress. At the net.wars blog, Wendy M. Grossman summarizes the discussion on the same topic at the Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection conference, where experts largely agreed, with some reservations. At Papers Please, travel data privacy expert Edward Hasbrouck argues, however, that the Executive Order does up-end rights promised to EU citizens under the EU-US PNR Agreement, which allows sharing of passenger name records.
PrivacyLawBlog: http://bit.ly/2k6zQcP
net.wars: http://bit.ly/2lqYupV
Papers Please: http://bit.ly/2lmZG1o

US: Court orders Google to turn over data stored outside the US
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The Washington Post reports that a federal magistrate judge has ordered Google to comply with a search warrant requiring the company to turn over emails stored outside the United States. The ruling is in direct contradiction to the recent Microsoft Ireland case, in which the US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit ruled that US law enforcement could not compel the production of emails stored on a foreign (Irish) server. In this case, Google has argued that since it breaks up the emails the company stores across its network, it cannot be sure where in the world the data resides. The judge's view is that the actions required will take place inside the US, no matter where the data is stored.
Washington Post: http://wapo.st/2kKssG5

EU: Vote nears for Marrakesh Treaty
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Intellectual Property Watch reports that a European Parliament vote on the Marrakesh Treaty, which creates copyright exceptions to give visually impaired people access to copyrighted works, is expected to take place in March. The treaty was adopted in 2013, but the EU has yet to ratify it despite being a signatory. In 2016 the Advocate General of the European Court of Justice signalled that the European Commission has the competency to ratify the treaty on behalf of all member states. Rapporteur Max Andersson expects compromise on the 100 amendments that have been put forward. However, both the European Blind Union and the World Blind Union oppose proposals to compensate publishers for accessible copies produced by NGOs and libraries, and the EBU is concerned about the suggestion of limiting the exceptions to works that are not commercially available. Finally, Germany wants the European Parliament to incorporate compensation for secondary rights holders. IFLA has called for the European Parliament to ratify the treaty without these impediments.
IP Watch: http://bit.ly/2k5RqCQ
IFLA: http://bit.ly/2ltQ0iH

Wikipedia community debates undisclosed paid promotional editing
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Motherboard reports that controversy has developed within the Wikipedia community over undisclosed paid promotional editing (UPPE) in violation of community standards that require paid editors to disclose their conflicts of interest on their user pages. However, not all do so, and it's difficult to draw lines between UPPE, other types of undisclosed paid editing, and self-interested unpaid editing, and between fair investigation and persecuting suspected offenders. Finding the right balance remains a challenge.
Motherboard: http://bit.ly/2k61dbU

US: Ohio police use pacemaker data in criminal investigation
----------------------------------------------------------------------
SC Magazine reports that police in Middletown, Ohio used data from a suspect's artificial heart implant to charge a man with setting fire to his own house. A cardiologist who reviewed the data, obtained via a search warrant, concluded that the data was inconsistent with the suspect's story. EFF staff attorney Stephanie Lacambra argues that people should not have to make a choice between health and privacy.
SC: http://bit.ly/2kpkPUC

Cameroon: Government clampdown widens to include international journalists
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Deutsche Welle reports that the Cameroonian government, having already cut off the country's English-speaking regions from the internet, is now threatening international journalists with sanctions if they report on the conflict. Both French and English are official languages in Cameroon. The media regulator has threatened to revoke the licenses of media outlets that report favorably on demands from the English-speaking minority.
DW: http://bit.ly/2lr4cYM

US: One hundred-plus technology companies join legal fight against travel ban
----------------------------------------------------------------------
CNN reports that more than 100 technology companies have signed on to support a lawsuit opposing US President Donald Trump's Executive Order , "Protecting the Nation from Foreign Terrorist Entry into the United States", which imposes a 90-day ban on admitting travellers from seven countries: Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Yemen, and Syria (indefinitely). The action was filed with the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals by the attorneys general of the states of Washington and Minnesota. The list includes Apple, Google, Intel, Microsoft, Netflix, Facebook, Airbnb, Uber, Paypal, and Tesla. CNN notes some major names are missing: IBM, Palantir, Oracle, and Cisco. According to Engadget, Amazon has expressed its support but hasn't signed the brief as it's a witness in the original case. Policy analyst Marcy Wheeler traces the background of how the seven countries were selected by the Trump administration' for the travel ban. At the Lawfare blog, former FBI analyst Nora Ellingsen studies two years of FBI arrests and finds that nothing in the large body of data we have about real terrorist plots in the United States supports either a focus on barring refugees or a focus on these particular seven countries.
CNN (ban): http://cnnmon.ie/2ltMGUG
CNN (tech companies): http://cnnmon.ie/2lqR3z5
Engadget: http://engt.co/2kVTaNY
Wheeler: http://bit.ly/2lqVqdn
Lawfare: http://bit.ly/2k5PUQW


FEATURES AND ANALYSIS
====================
For more features and analysis selected by the Program team, visit:
http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:oped/

The fake news bogeyman
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this piece for Deutsche Welle, Ethan Zuckerman argues that "fake news" is a bogeyman because it means that people who disagree with us have simply been given the wrong facts. In preliminary analysis from the Media Cloud team at Harvard and MIT, the most influential fake news site ranked only 163rd in their list of most-shared sources. What gives fake news its greatest visibility is mainstream media reports about it. Propaganda and disinformation, he notes, are as old as humanity. More important is finding common ground with people we disagree with. The IFLA blog argues that libraries have a long history of verifying information, and highlights two papers published by IFLA in conjunction with The Wikipedia Library that showcase successful collaborations between the two organizations. In the Guardian, Wikipedia co-founder Jimmy Wales argues that transparency and a free and open internet is essential to combating the spread of disinformation.
DW: http://bit.ly/2k6z3Zm
IFLA: http://bit.ly/2k6pud5
Guardian: http://bit.ly/2kKGd7V

Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection
----------------------------------------------------------------------
At this YouTube channel, CPDP has posted videos of the sessions from this year's conference. Of particular note are the closing Caspar Bowden panel on surveillance; the panel on the effect of big data on the insurance industry; and the panel on populist politics and the prospects for privacy.
YouTube (CPDP channel): http://bit.ly/2kRaUuA
YouTube (Bowden): http://bit.ly/2kuCz3u
YouTube (insurance): http://bit.ly/2lqR31W
YouTube (populist): http://bit.ly/2ln0iUK

Data vigilantes
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this Guardian article, Stephen Buranyi reports on the controversy surrounding Statcheck, a computer program, written by Michèle Nuijten at Tilbert University's Meta-Research Center, that reads scientific papers and checks the mathematics behind every statistical result it encounters. An early target of Statcheck's work was the field of psychology, where researchers found that about half of the papers published in psychology journals contained a statistical error. The controversy began when Hartgerink's colleague, Chris Hartgerink, who modified the program so that it would catalogue the errors and post them online. Scientific fraud is typically estimated at around 2%; the researchers believe that the true rate is far higher.
Guardian: http://bit.ly/2lqZoCR

Egypt: Civil society under phishing attack
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this report, the result of research it conducted with the Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights, Citizen Lab studies recent coordinated phishing attacks on Egyptian NGOs, intended to trick them into giving up their email and other passwords. As Citizen Lab notes, such attacks are common and relatively low-tech, but often effective. The investigators have found strong circumstantial - but not conclusive - evidence to suggest that the attack was mounted by the Egyptian government, which has been cracking down on civil society.
CitizenLab: http://bit.ly/2ltC6Nr

AI comes of age: in cars, healthcare, and journalism
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this report from the Aspen Institute, "Artificial Intelligence Comes of Age", David Bollier summarizes its round table on artificial intelligence in connected cars, healthcare, and journalism. While the workshop did not reach any firm conclusions, it did identify key questions to ask. How should markets evolve? What are the proper forms of government regulation? What internal governance structures and safeguards should AI adopt? How can social trust in AI technologies be earned? Participants included Joi Ito (MIT Media Lab), Stuart Frankel (Narrative Science), Cynthia Breazeal (MIT Media lab), Mustafa Suleyman (Google DeepMind), David Kenny (IBM Watson), Marc Rotenberg (EPIC), and Fr E. Salobir (OPTIC, Order of Preachers).
Aspen (PDF): http://bit.ly/2k5W4kd

Irish High Court hearings on transatlantic data flows
----------------------------------------------------------------------
On this page and on Twitter (@maxschrems), Max Schrems is posting updates on the Irish High Court hearings in "Data Protection Commissioner v. Facebook ireland Ltd and Maximilian Schrems", which began on February 7 and are expected to last three weeks. The case concerns Facebook's use of standard contractual clauses to allow the company to transfer EU citizens' personal data to the US after the Safe Harbor agreement was voided in an earlier case brought by Schrems. The Irish data protection commissioner argues that the contracts include no provision for allowing it to suspend data flows; Facebook argues that surveillance in the US is no worse than in the EU and so its data transfers should be acceptable. Among those submitting amicus curiae briefs are the US government, the Electronic Privacy Information Center, DigitalEurope, and the British Software Alliance.
Europe v. Facebook: http://bit.ly/2lqQVPU

***

DIARY
==============
To see more events recommended by the Information Program team, visit:
https://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:events/. If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

Robots Exhibition
----------------------------------------
February 8 - September 13
London, UK
The Science Museum's 2017 robots exhibition includes robotic artefacts over five centuries, from a 16th century mechanized monk to the latest research developments. Focusing on why they exist rather than on how they work, the exhibition explores the ways robots mirror humanity and the insights they offer into our ambitions, desires and position in a rapidly changing world.
http://bit.ly/2kpgPn2

Internet Freedom Festival
----------------------------------------
March 6-10, 2017
Valencia, Spain
The Internet Freedom Festival gathers the community keeping the Internet open and uncensored for a week of free-form multidisciplinary collaboration intended to help groups achieve their goals. Attendance is free and open to the public.
http://bit.ly/2dI8EV1

Open Education Global 2017
----------------------------------------
March 8-10, 2017
Cape Town, South Africa
This year marks several important milestones in Open Education, including the 15-year anniversary of the term "Open Educational Resources" and the five-year anniversary of the Paris OER Declaration. For those who remember the start of the movement, this conference will provide the opportunity to celebrate and reflect on these and other achievements, reconnect with colleagues and friends, and learn about new ideas and initiatives.
http://bit.ly/2jUcqJp

17th TACD Multi-Stakeholder Forum
----------------------------------------
March 21, 2017
Washington, DC
This year's TACD Multi-stakeholder Forum, titled "A consumer agenda for transatlantic markets: safeguarding protections and making progress in times of political change", will bring together participants representing civil society, academics, researchers, as well government, legislators , regulatory authorities and business on both sides of the Atlantic to discuss a pro-consumer agenda for transatlantic markets.
http://bit.ly/2lmVX42

Rightscon 2017
----------------------------------------
March 29-31, 2017
Brussels, Belgium
RightsCon will tackle the most pressing issues at the intersection of technology and human rights. Session proposals are being accepted until November 25, 2016.
http://bit.ly/I2ZAUZ

We Robot
----------------------------------------
March 31-April 1, 2017
New Haven, Connecticut
The sixth annual We Robot will be held at Yale Law School and will focus on the coming legal and policy conflicts as robots and AI become part of daily life.
http://bit.ly/2fVF2SI

OER 17
----------------------------------------
April 5-6, 2017
London, UK
This year's OER will present an opportunity for open practitioners, activists, educators, and policy makers to come together to reflect on 'The Politics of Open'. Up for discussion are questions such as: What are our current key challenges and strengths - locally, nationally, and internationally? What are our priorities - in terms of political governance, organisational and personal politics? What are the changes that we want to effect together? The conference will be chaired by social and educational technologist and Wikimedia UK Trustee Josie Fraser, and Alek Tarkowski, Director of Centrum Cyfrowe, co-founder and coordinator of Creative Commons Poland.
http://bit.ly/2k5V7bC

Personal Democracy Forum 2017
----------------------------------------
April 6-7
Gdansk, Poland
The 5th edition of Personal Democracy Forum will serve as a platform for exchanging ideas and experiences for people using new technologies to work for civic participation and transparency in public life in Central and Eastern Europe.
http://bit.ly/2j7q7HT

TICTeC 2017
----------------------------------------
April 25-26, 2017
Florence, Italy
This will be the third mySociety conference on the impacts of civic technology.
http://bit.ly/2e5NifJ

2017 IFLA International News Media Conference
----------------------------------------
April 27-28, 2017
Reykjavik, Iceland
This conference will examine issues and challenges in collecting and preserving the news and making it available to users. Do access and preservation have different prerequisites? In addition, the conference will explore how news media is used and transformed by researchers and the public. Can we recognize variable user needs? Do we offer the most suitable APIs?
http://bit.ly/2gjYmu2

Creative Commons Global Summit
----------------------------------------
April 28-30, 2017
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
This event will gather a global community of technologists, academics, activists, creatives, and legal experts to work together on the expansion and growth of the commons, open knowledge, and free culture for all.
http://bit.ly/2cO3x0P

IFLA MetLib 2017
----------------------------------------
April 30-May 5, 2017
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
The 2017 programme theme is "Partnerships: Creating a new vision for libraries". Among the subthemes will be discussions of how and why to use, form, and manage partnerships, management tools, and best practices.
http://bit.ly/2ghPOPp

OpenTech
----------------------------------------
May 13, 2017
London, UK
OpenTech 2017 is an informal, low cost, one-day conference on slightly different approaches to technology, experience and democracy. Talks by people who work on things that matter guarantees a day of thoughtful talks leading to conversations with friends.
http://bit.ly/2lmW53w

4th Africa Library Summit and 2nd AfLIA conference
----------------------------------------
May 14-20, 2017
Yaounde, Cameroon
Moved from Ethiopia to the site of the second bidder due to safety concerns, this conference co-locates the fourth Africa Library Sumit and the second African Library and Information Associations and Institutions conference.
http://bit.ly/2hsw64E

Citizen Science Conference 2017
----------------------------------------
May 17-20, 2017
St Paul, Minnesota
The biennial citizen science conference brings together a diverse group of researchers, practitioners, community organizations, and participants.
http://bit.ly/2jspOWl

IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy
----------------------------------------
May 22-24, 2017
San Jose, California
The 38th annual meeting will present developments in computer security and electronic privacy, and for bringing together researchers and practitioners in the field.
http://bit.ly/2hsqUhj

Workshop on Technology and Consumer Protection
----------------------------------------
May 22-24, 2017
San Jose, California
Co-hosted with the IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy, ConPro will explore computer science topics with an impact on consumers. This workshop has a strong security and privacy slant, with an overall focus on ways in which computer science can prevent, detect, or address the potential for technology to deceive or unfairly harm consumers.
http://bit.ly/2fJ6ShN

Privacy Law Scholars
----------------------------------------
June 1-2
Berkeley, California
The tenth annual Privacy Law Scholars workshop will assemble a wide array of privacy law scholars and practitioners from around the world to discuss papers in progress. Scholars from many disciplines, including psychology, economics, sociology, philosophy, political science, computer science, and mathematics also participate.
http://bit.ly/2ln2Rq3

Next Library Festival 2017
----------------------------------------
June 11-14, 2017
Aarhus, Denmark
Next Library 2017 will offer a "patchwork" of co-learning, co-creative, participatory, engaging, pluralistic and interactive meetings, and lots of parallel sessions, keynote speakers, wildcard sessions, demos/exhibitions, gaming, Networking Dinner Party, Get2Gether, Social un-conferences, alternative events and surprises.
http://bit.ly/2hHNt4W

CERN Workshop on Innovations in Scholarly Communication
----------------------------------------
June 21-23, 2017
Geneva, Switzerland
The organizers of the biennial CERN Workshop on Innovations in Scholarly Communication - OAI10 - include representatives from the Open Society Foundations, SPARC, PloS, CERN, UCL, and other academic institutions..
http://bit.ly/2jzXj6X

Open Repositories 2017
----------------------------------------
June 26-30, 2017
Brisbane, Australia
The annual Open Repositories Conference brings together users and developers of open digital repository platforms from higher education, government, galleries, libraries, archives and museums. The Conference provides an interactive forum for delegates from around the world to come together and explore the global challenges and opportunities facing libraries and the broader scholarly information landscape.
http://bit.ly/2aOCiGp

Summer courses on privacy and international copyright laws
----------------------------------------
July 3-7, 2017
Amsterdam, Netherlands
These courses, run by the Institute for Information Law, are intensive post-graduate courses aimed to help professionals stay abreast of changing rules. The first, on privacy law and policy, focuses on recent developments in EU and US privacy law relating to the internet and online media. The second, on international copyright law, comprises nine seminars, each focused on one specific copyright issue.
http://bit.ly/2lmPgim

IFLA World Libraries and Information Congress
----------------------------------------
August 19-25, 2017
Wroclaw, Poland
The theme of the 83rd annual IFLA congress will be "Achieving a healthy future together: diverse and emerging roles for health information professionals".
http://bit.ly/2gErkVa

Privacy + Security Forum
----------------------------------------
October 4-6, 2017
Washington, DC
The conference breaks down the silos of security and privacy by bringing together leaders from both fields.
http://bit.ly/1PZhExo

***

Hear more from the Information Program!
================================
If you want to hear more from the Information Program team each week, consider subscribing to our shared bookmarks on delicious using this RSS feed:
http://feeds.pinboard.in/rss/secret:95194ab804ccccac713b/u:osi_info_program/

You can also read more about our work on the Open Society Foundations website: http://www.opensocietyfoundations.org/about/programs/information-program

Hear less from the Information Program!
================================
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News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week ending 27 January 2017
====================================================
The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF. Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

Our staff, advisers and major grantees tweet at http://bit.ly/13j5fjq. Current and former grantees featured in this issue: ADC, Creative Commons, Copyright for Creativity (C4C), Data and Society Institute, EDRi, EFF, IFLA, R3D, SPARC.

PROGRAM NEWS

NEWS
=====
For breaking news stories, visit: http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:news/

US officially withdraws from Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The BBC reports that, as expected, on his third day in office newly-inaugurated US President Donald Trump signed an executive order withdrawing from the 12-country Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP). The deal had never been ratified by the US Congress. The BBC adds that the news is likely to be welcome in China, which was not included in the deal, and which saw TPP as an attempt by the US to dominate the region. The White House web page on trade deals says Trump is also committed to renegotiating the North Atlantic Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), which has been in place since 1994. EFF, which opposed TPP because of its intellectual property and other provisions, wrote the agreement's post-mortem in November, but noted the agreement may still cause the same problems EFF has warned against if it goes ahead without the US. Bloomberg reports that Canada hopes to salvage the agreement without the US. Japan's Chief Cabinet Secretary, Yoshihide Suga, told CNN that he hopes Trump will reconsider; signatories have until 2018 to ratify the agreement. 
BBC (TTP): http://bbc.in/2jsj8b4
BBC (China): http://bbc.in/2jUm5Q4
White House: http://bit.ly/2kvPxiu
EFF: http://bit.ly/2gjLVtV
Bloomberg: http://bloom.bg/2j7tVso
CNBC: http://cnb.cx/2jhWlLr

US: Appeals court rules US law doesn't au

The Washington Post reports that the Second Circuit federal appeals court has declined to overturn the lower court decision that US law cannot be used to compel Microsoft to hand over data stored on  its Irish servers. The Department of Justice may now try to appeal the case to the Supreme Court or push for legislation to support such extraterritorial data requests.
Washington Post: http://wapo.st/2kvW6BL

EU considers legally designating robots "electronic persons"
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The Law Street blog reports that the EU has issued a draft report, written by MEP Mady Delvaux (Socialist Workers Party-Luxembourg), that proposes designating robots as "electronic persons" for legal purposes, much as corporations have legal personhood. Electronic personhood would enable the allocation of liability. In the interim, the report views harmonised rules for self-driving cars as an urgent necessity, and favours an obligatory insurance scheme and fund to compensate victims of accidents. Delvaux and others are campaigning to create a new European agency for robotics and artificial intelligence. 
Law Street: http://bit.ly/2kvPEqr
European Parliament: http://bit.ly/2k3qlix

China: Government bans unauthorized internet connections
----------------------------------------------------------------------
SCMP reports that the Chinese Ministry of Industry and Information Technology has announced a requirement that all special cable and VPN services on the mainland require prior government approval. The move makes most VPN service providers effectively illegal. The Ministry claims the purpose is to "strengthen cyberspace information security management"; however, the net effect is to tighten the country's "Great Firewall" by banning services that allow users to bypass it. At BoingBoing, Cory Doctorow reports on a Harvard study analysing the Chinese government strategically distracts its population from political dissent by injecting nearly 450 million posts a year into social media.
SCMP: http://bit.ly/2kmCCfy
BoingBoing: http://bit.ly/2jzU0N7

Australia: Biometrics will replace paper passports
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Gizmodo reports that Australia is implementing the Seamless Traveller biometric system for recognizing arriving international travelers to replace paper passports and other forms of identity documentation. The goal is to have 90% of arrivals passing through unmanned electronic stations, with humans intervening only in case of a technical issue or travel restriction. The system is budgeted for $94 million over five years. At the net.wars blog, Wendy M. Grossman recounts a presentation at the 2013 Biometrics conference by Accenture Ireland's Joe Flynn on how the streamlined "MAGICAL" airport of 2020 is supposed to work.
Gizmodo: http://bit.ly/2jUmCBy
net.wars: http://bit.ly/2jzYnb2

Bahrain: Government bans online newspaper publication
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Global Voices reports that on January 16 the Bahraini government banned the country's only independent newspaper, al-Wasat, from "using electronic media tools". Besides its website, the paper has accounts followed by hundreds of thousands of people on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook, and also maintains a YouTube channel and an Instagram account. Activists speculate that the immediate cause of the ban may have been the paper's coverage of the January 15 execution of three men who had been convicted of killing three policemen in a 2014 bombing attack. The paper has been subject to similar bans in the past.
Global Voices: http://bit.ly/2k3mhP6

Open access mandate blocks Gates-funded research from publication
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Nature reports that scientists whose research is funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation are unable to publish the results in leading journals including Nature, Science, the New England Journal of Medicine, and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). The reason is the Gates Foundation's open access policy, which requires the researchers it funds to open the resulting papers and underlying data sets immediately upon publication. Peter Suber predicts that the journals will ultimately compromise. Inside Higher Ed gives further background and compares the Gates policy with those of other foundations.
Nature: http://go.nature.com/2jzSeLS
Inside Higher Ed: http://bit.ly/2kvKUVB


FEATURES AND ANALYSIS
====================
For more features and analysis selected by the Program team, visit:
http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:oped/

Online advertising: bad for the news business
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this piece for the Verge, veteran journalist Walt Mossberg writes that the methods used to fund modern journalism - primarily advertising - simultaneously undermine trust in the news outlets. To advertisers, quality news is just a way to profile readers, whom they can then target with ads on cheaper sites. At Medium, Sean Blanda provides Exhibit A: Medium itself, which is struggling to break even like every other well-intentioned start-up aimed at providing a better system. Fake news is only one piece of the problem; the bigger issue is that people discover news via companies such as Facebook, Google, and Twitter, which do not make any more money by supporting good journalism. At the Guardian, Evgeny Morozov blames the advertising-supported business model, comparing the problem of getting rid of fake news to tackling climate change. At the Washington Post, Anne Applebaum recounts her experience as the focus of a smear campaign; the experience taught her how fake websites and fake news reinforce each other. IFEX argues that government regulation is a bigger threat than fake news. TechCrunch reports that a study conducted by social psychologists at Cambridge (UK), Yale, and George Mason (US) has found that using proactive warnings that pre-expose users to factual distortion in advance is an effective strategy for countering the spread of misinformation online. At the Data and Society blog, Danah Boyd considers whether part of the problem is US cultural norms which dictate teaching children that they can make good decisions if they do their own research and trust their gut instincts.
Verge: http://bit.ly/2kw1jJZ
Medium: http://bit.ly/2jUppLj
Guardian:: http://bit.ly/2k6sZUM
Washington Post: http://wapo.st/2jhVb2I
IFEX: http://bit.ly/2kmwHXQ
TechCrunch: http://tcrn.ch/2k3mXnK

Latin America, Europe: The ever-expanding national security state
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article at the Guardian, John Dalhuisen summarizes Amnesty International's report, "Dangerously Disproportionate", which reviews the expanding national security state across Europe and concludes that the edifice of rights protection carefully constructed after the Second World War is being dismantled. The report's eight themes: states of emergency, principle of legality, right to privacy, freedom of expression, right to liberty, freedom of movement, stripping of nationality, and the prohibition on sending people to places where they risk torture. In a blog posting, EFF and its partners summarize their review of surveillance in Latin America in 2016. Among the highlights: Chile's highest court has authorized surveillance balloons; Argentina, over opposition from ADC, is creating a registry of users' mobile communication services; Paraguay's military is spying on journalists; Peru has spent $22 million on software to surveil communications from the Israeli company Verint; and Mexico is fighting a court case brought by R3D opposing data retention.
Guardian:: http://bit.ly/2ji9kNf
Amnesty International: http://bit.ly/2k3sPNz
EFF: http://bit.ly/2kvJHts

The privacy paradox
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this video clip, Benjamin Wittes discusses his and Emma Kohse's new paper on the "privacy paradox" at the Brookings Institution with Amie Stepanovich (Access Now) and Stewart Baker (Steptoe and Johnson). In their earlier paper, Wittes and Kohse challenged the assumption that privacy is an eroding value; instead, people may buy online to protect their privacy from specific people in their lives, such as neighbors and family members. Privacy scholars and activists, they hypothesized, focus on harms and generally fail to take these benefits into account. In this paper they tested the hypothesis using Google Surveys, which they admit is a crude measure. They found the platform challenging to adapt for their questions, as they had to find euphemisms for terms Google prohibits, such as pornography, vibrators, and condoms. The researchers found that the percentage of consumers who would rather buy sensitive personal items online is roughly double the number who do the same for general household items: these decisions are not solely driven by convenience.
Brookings (video): http://brook.gs/2jUneXW
Brookings (paper): http://brook.gs/2jzMIZK

Adapting the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting for the LSE Media Policy Project, LSE academic Sonia Livingstone edits the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child to reflect today's digital world. Although it was adopted in 1989, Livingstone believes the Convention is not out of date. Her edited version is intended to remind policy makers that a third of internet users worldwide are under 18 and that children's rights merit our collective attention. Children should be empowered; for example, incoming laws such as the General Data Protection Regulation should include requirements to simplify terms and conditions for this younger audience.
LSE: http://bit.ly/2jssWll

Hungary, Ukraine: Working towards accountability and transparency
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting, The Engine Room discusses (and updates the progress of) its second replication sprint, which involves taking past successful projects and working with organizations facing similar challenges to develop immediately useful tools and complete end products developed to their specific needs. For this week's challenge, The Engine Room is working with Opora (based in Ukraine) and K-Monitor (Hungary), which are fighting for more transparency and accountability in their countries. Opora's project aims to increase citizens' influence on the government, beginning with creating a database for election donations from 2014 onwards. K-Monitor, which maintains the biggest news database on corruption cases in Hungary, wants to make the assets and incomes of decision-makers transparent and comparable over time.
Engine Room: http://bit.ly/2kvFCcO

Copyright Week
----------------------------------------------------------------------
On these pages, EFF provides links to myriad organizations celebrating Copyright Week, including Creative Commons, Copyright for Creativity (C4C), IFLA, SPARC, EDRi, New Media Rights, Public Knowledge, the Authors Alliance, and the American Library Association. Each of the linked pages discusses an aspect of copyright such as: the public domain, digital rights management, copyright reform, the use of copyright law for censorship, and transparency. Intellectual Property Watch surveys the year ahead for IP law in the US.
EFF: http://bit.ly/2kmy2xE
IP Watch: http://bit.ly/2jzUgeS

***

DIARY
==============
To see more events recommended by the Information Program team, visit:
https://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:events/. If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

FOSSDEM 2017
When: February 4 - 5
Where: Brussels, Belgium
----------------------------------------
FOSSDEM is a two-day event organised by volunteers to promote the widespread use of free and open source software. A free and non-commercial event organised by the community for the community, the goal is to provide free and open source software developers and communities a place to meet to get in touch with other developers and projects, and be informed about the latest developments in the open source and free software worlds.
http://bit.ly/2k6u0MA

Internet Freedom Festival
----------------------------------------
March 6-10, 2017
Valencia, Spain
The Internet Freedom Festival gathers the community keeping the Internet open and uncensored for a week of free-form multidisciplinary collaboration intended to help groups achieve their goals. Attendance is free and open to the public.
http://bit.ly/2dI8EV1

Open Education Global 2017
----------------------------------------
March 8-10, 2017
Cape Town, South Africa

This year marks several important milestones in Open Education, including the 15-year anniversary of the term "Open Educational Resources" and the five-year anniversary of the Paris OER Declaration. For those who remember the start of the movement, this conference will provide the opportunity to celebrate and reflect on these and other achievements, reconnect with colleagues and friends, and learn about new ideas and initiatives.
http://bit.ly/2jUcqJp

Rightscon 2017
----------------------------------------
March 29-31, 2017
Brussels, Belgium
RightsCon will tackle the most pressing issues at the intersection of technology and human rights. Session proposals are being accepted until November 25, 2016.
http://bit.ly/I2ZAUZ

We Robot
----------------------------------------
March 31-April 1, 2017
New Haven, Connecticut
The sixth annual We Robot will be held at Yale Law School and will focus on the coming legal and policy conflicts as robots and AI become part of daily life.
http://bit.ly/2fVF2SI

Personal Democracy Forum 2017
April 6-7
Gdansk, Poland
The 5th edition of Personal Democracy Forum will serve as a platform for exchanging ideas and experiences for people using new technologies to work for civic participation and transparency in public life in Central and Eastern Europe.
http://bit.ly/2j7q7HT

TICTeC 2017
----------------------------------------
April 25-26, 2017
Florence, Italy
This will be the third mySociety conference on the impacts of civic technology.
http://bit.ly/2e5NifJ

2017 IFLA International News Media Conference
----------------------------------------
April 27-28, 2017
Reykjavik, Iceland
This conference will examine issues and challenges in collecting and preserving the news and making it available to users. Do access and preservation have different prerequisites? In addition, the conference will explore how news media is used and transformed by researchers and the public. Can we recognize variable user needs? Do we offer the most suitable APIs? 
http://bit.ly/2gjYmu2

Creative Commons Global Summit
----------------------------------------
April 28-30, 2017
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
This event will gather a global community of technologists, academics, activists, creatives, and legal experts to work together on the expansion and growth of the commons, open knowledge, and free culture for all. 
http://bit.ly/2cO3x0P

MetLib 2017
----------------------------------------
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
The 2017 programme theme is "Partnerships: Creating a new vision for libraries". Among the subthemes will be discussions of how and why to use, form, and manage partnerships, management tools, and best practices. 
http://bit.ly/2ghPOPp

4th Africa Library Summit and 2nd AfLIA conference
----------------------------------------
May 14-20, 2017
Yaounde, Cameroon
Moved from Ethiopia to the site of the second bidder due to safety concerns, this conference co-locates the fourth Africa Library Sumit and the second African Library and Information Associations and Institutions conference.
http://bit.ly/2hsw64E

Citizen Science Conference 2017
----------------------------------------
May 17-20, 2017
St Paul, Minnesota
The biennial citizen science conference brings together a diverse group of researchers, practitioners, community organizations, and participants. 
http://bit.ly/2jspOWl

IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy
----------------------------------------
May 22-24, 2017
San Jose, California
The 38th annual meeting will present developments in computer security and electronic privacy, and for bringing together researchers and practitioners in the field. 
http://bit.ly/2hsqUhj

Workshop on Technology and Consumer Protection 
----------------------------------------
May 22-24, 2017
San Jose, California
Co-hosted with the IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy, ConPro will explore computer science topics with an impact on consumers. This workshop has a strong security and privacy slant, with an overall focus on ways in which computer science can prevent, detect, or address the potential for technology to deceive or unfairly harm consumers. 
http://bit.ly/2fJ6ShN

Next Library Festival 2017
----------------------------------------
June 11-14, 2017
Aarhus, Denmark
Next Library 2017 will offer a "patchwork" of co-learning, co-creative, participatory, engaging, pluralistic and interactive meetings, and lots of parallel sessions, keynote speakers, wildcard sessions, demos/exhibitions, gaming, Networking Dinner Party, Get2Gether, Social un-conferences, alternative events and surprises.
http://bit.ly/2hHNt4W

CERN Workshop on Innovations in Scholarly Communication
----------------------------------------
June 21-23, 2017
Geneva, Switzerland
The organizers of the biennial CERN Workshop on Innovations in Scholarly Communication - OAI10 - include representatives from the Open Society Foundations, SPARC, PloS, CERN, UCL, and other academic institutions..
http://bit.ly/2jzXj6X

Open Repositories 2017
----------------------------------------
June 26-30, 2017
Brisbane, Australia
The annual Open Repositories Conference brings together users and developers of open digital repository platforms from higher education, government, galleries, libraries, archives and museums. The Conference provides an interactive forum for delegates from around the world to come together and explore the global challenges and opportunities facing libraries and the broader scholarly information landscape.
http://bit.ly/2aOCiGp

Summer courses on privacy and international copyright laws
----------------------------------------
July 3-7, 2017
Amsterdam, Netherlands
These courses, run by the Institute for Information Law, are intensive post-graduate courses aimed to help professionals stay abreast of changing rules. The first, on privacy law and policy, focuses on recent developments in EU and US privacy law relating to the internet and online media. The second, on international copyright law, comprises nine seminars, each focused on one specific copyright issue.
https://www.ivir.nl/education/summer-courses/

IFLA World Libraries and Information Congress
----------------------------------------
August 19-25, 2017
Wroclaw, Poland
The theme of the 83rd annual IFLA congress will be "Achieving a healthy future together: diverse and emerging roles for health information professionals". 
http://bit.ly/2gErkVa

Privacy + Security Forum
----------------------------------------
October 4-6, 2017
Washington, DC
The conference breaks down the silos of security and privacy by bringing together leaders from both fields. 
http://bit.ly/1PZhExo

***

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News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week ending 13 January 2017
====================================================
The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF. Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.
 
Our staff, advisers and major grantees tweet at http://bit.ly/13j5fjq. Current and former grantees featured in this issue: EDRi, OKFN, R3D.
 
PROGRAMME NEWS
 
Correction
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The report on an OKFN blog posting on the Open Government Partnership in the NEWS DIGEST for the week ending December 23 2016 misspelled Mor Rubinstein's last name and misreported her gender. We apologize for the error.
OKFN: http://bit.ly/2iavapN
 
Life in a Quantified Society
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The Open Society Foundation has published a basic guide to its work on the Quantified Society, explaining the underpinning technologies and their impact on individuals' everyday lives. Topics include pervasive data collection, algorithmic decision-making, and the problems these pose for accountability and open access to information.
https://osf.to/2hTp3Ub
 
 
NEWS
=====
For breaking news stories, visit: http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:news/
 
US formally accuses Russians of hacking the November elections
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Writing for the NYU Law School Just Security blog, Ronald Deibert calls the joint FBI-Department of Homeland Security report on Russian cyber interference in the 2016 US election "badly constructed". Deibert complains that the White House fails to present the evidence linking the cyber espionage operations to Russia and that much of the critical evidence vital to the public interest is being kept secret, either by the National Security Agency or by private cyber security firms. At Esquire, Kings College professor Thomas Rid outlines the background of 20 years of Russian hacks of the US and discusses the role Wikileaks played in publishing the results. The New York Times calls the situation the realisation of "Julian Assange's years-old vision". Bruce Schneier discusses the problem of attribution in cyberspace. 
JustSecurity: http://bit.ly/2iP7G6u
Esquire: http://bit.ly/2jqZ0nl
NY Times: http://nyti.ms/2j7u0Jr
Schneier: http://bit.ly/2iP9qwt
 
EU: European Commission launches e-privacy directive
----------------------------------------------------------------------
EDRi reports that the European Commission has released its proposals for the e-privacy directive, which EDRi argues needs substantial improvement. It consists of three elements: a legislative proposal for replacing regulation 2001/45; a communication on the "data economy", and a communication on exchanging and protecting international data flows in a globalized world. The EC's press conference to discuss the announcement will be live-streamed on January 17.
EDRi: http://bit.ly/2iOYLBR
EC (press release): http://bit.ly/2irF0Tj
EC (regulation): http://bit.ly/2j7vKCI
EC (data economy): http://bit.ly/2jf5hoE
EC (data flows): http://bit.ly/2iP4PdX
 
US: Police subpoena Amazon Echo data in murder case
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The Center for Democracy and Technology reports that police investigating a murder in Bentonville, Arkansas ended 2016 by issuing a warrant to Amazon to demand that the company turn over audio recordings from an Echo home automation device. Amazon has refused to comply, and it is not clear which aspects - wiretap, stored communications, or trap and trace - of the Electronic Communications Privacy Act apply to the snippets of voice recording retained by the company. The Register reports that when a TV reporter, discussing the story of a child who accidentally ordered her family's Alexa device to order her a dollhouse, repeated on-air the command, "Alexa, order me a dollhouse", Echo devices around the country began attempting to fulfill the order. Online purchasing is turned on by default on these devices. 
CDT: http://bit.ly/2ik9PLa
Register: http://bit.ly/2iP59JA
 
Australia: Commission recommends adoption of fair use
----------------------------------------------------------------------
InfoJustice summarizes the report issued at the end of December 2016 by the Australian Government Productivity Commission has recommended the introduction of fair use into copyright law, along with other changes on patents, copyright, and enforcement. The Commission has warned that copyright is too restrictive, in both scope and length of term, and proposes introducing a system of user rights. TechDirt lists the main points and reposts the entire 766-page report, which was released under a CC-BY license.
InfoJustice: http://bit.ly/2irDiBe
TechDirt: http://bit.ly/2jE2FO0
 
New York proposes mandating passenger GPS coordinates
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Freedom to Tinker reports that New York City's Taxi and Limousine Commission has proposed a new rule that would require car service platform companies such as Lyft and Uber to add GPS coordinates of customers' drop-off and pick-up points to existing requirements. New York's Freedom of Information law would make the bulk data subject to full public release. The stated justification is to combat "driver fatigue" and improve safety; however, the rule does not match the purpose and raises serious threats to passenger privacy. 
Freedom to Tinker: http://bit.ly/2irFHvI
 
Germany, Peru, Taiwan: Scientists lose access to Elsevier journals
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Nature reports on the alternatives being pursued by scientists in Germany, Peru, and Taiwan now that their access to Elsevier journals has ended. Peru's government has terminated funding to pay for a license. Contract negotiations in Germany and Taiwan broke down in December; because negotiations resumed in Taiwan in early January, Elsevier has granted a one-month extension to the Taiwanese universities that had canceled their subscriptions.
Nature: http://go.nature.com/2jeF7Tq
 
Iran: Pornography filter breaks browsers across the world
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The Verge reports that 256 websites, many of them pornographic, were blocked for users from Russia to Hong Kong when Iran activated a censorship filter using a technique called BGP hijacking that directs computers to phony routes. Iran's national telecom company is pivotal to the transit of data through the region. The situation began to resolve after approximately 28 hours. At its blog, Dyn has more detail and background on BGP hacking in general and Iranian censorship in particular.
Verge: http://bit.ly/2jeNezz
Dyn: http://bit.ly/2inpZi1
 
AI research fund founded to promote research into the public interest
----------------------------------------------------------------------
TechCrunch reports that LinkedIn founder Reid Hoffman and eBay founder Pierre Omidyar have each put $10 million into seeding the $27 million Ethics and Governance of Artificial intelligence Fund to promote research into artificial intelligence in the public interest. As algorithms make an increasing range of key decisions with ramifications throughout society, the Fund's founders believe it's crucial that AI research should include input from many disciplines, including social science, law, ethics, and religion. The founding academic institutions will be the MIT Media Lab and Harvard's Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society. 
TechCrunch: http://tcrn.ch/2jeGAJo
 
FEATURES AND ANALYSIS
====================
For more features and analysis selected by the Program team, visit:
http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:oped/
 
Chaos Computer Congress 33
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this Guardian piece, Alex Hern lists five key technologies talks at the 2016 Chaos Computer Congress identified as broken: intercoms, boarding cards, smart meters, elections, and random number generators. At his blog, Edward Hasbrouck discusses the boarding card issues - which he highlighted more than 15 years ago - in greater detail. CCC-TV makes available video of the conference talks; EDRi's page highlights those given by its members and observers on topics such as German state surveillance, the state of internet politics in Austria, and the issues surrounding law enforcement hacking. Among notable talks is Aylin Caliskin's discussion of prejudice in word embeddings - language models that translate words into numeric vectors for uses such as web search, sentiment analysis, and machine learning. 
Guardian: http://bit.ly/2irLcdV
Hasbrouck: http://bit.ly/2jLU8Ne
C3: http://bit.ly/2iP3ZO8
EDRi: http://bit.ly/2ikipcT
C3 (Caliskin): http://bit.ly/2ikbyQK
 
Building the LibreRouter
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this interview at Global Voice, published in Spanish and English, Gui Iribarren, vice-president of AlterMundi, discusses the LibreRouter project, which aims to make it easier to get online without relying on a corporate hardware manufacturer and build community networks. AlterMundi expects to delivery the first version of this router to community networks in Argentina and South Africa.
Global Voices: http://bit.ly/2jr3tGL
 
(Dis)Information mercenaries
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this posting at Medium, University of Zurich mathematician and PersonalData.io founder Paul-Olivier Dehaye studies the methodology of Cambridge Analytica, which has been widely reported to have helped the Trump campaign micro-target messages based on the thousands of data points it claims to have on every American. Dehaye reports that the same vendor and its affiliates have built "PSYOPS" dashboards to manipulate populations in Libya, Afghanistan, and countless other countries. In a YouTube talk, Cambridge Analytica founder Alexander Nix discusses the power of big data.
Medium: http://bit.ly/2j7IhGa
YouTube: http://bit.ly/2ikeFbe
 
The real name fallacy
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this Coral Project blog posting, J.Nathan Matias dissects the fallacy that requiring real names will end bad online behavior. Among his points: most online attackers are already known to their targets in real life; identity protection is important for vulnerable people; and many hate groups seek legitimacy by operating openly. Design alone is not a solution, and the outcomes of such efforts should be systematically tested.
Coral Project: http://bit.ly/2jDUf9s
 
The new world
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this series of radio programs the BBC explores aspects of "The New World" such as globalisation, changing demographics, the rise of anti-elitist populism, the balance of power, and the "post-truth" world. Each piece traces its topic back to the roots of the change, seeking to answer the main question, "When did this happen?"
BBC: http://bbc.in/2ik4gfL
 
Cyberwar for sale
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this piece from the New York Times magazine, Mattathias Schwartz explores the activities of the privately-owned Milan-based surveillance software maker Hacking Team as revealed by documents made public after the company was itself hacked. The Mexican civil liberties group R3D, for example, was able to use the leaked documents to unveil surveillance in the state of Puebla; Mexico is Hacking Team's largest export market. Hacking Team has fewer than 50 employees, but its global roster of companies include the FBI, the Drug Enforcement Administration, Egypt, Honduras, Uzbekistan, Turkey, and Sudan. Once surreptitiously installed on a target's computer or phone, Hacking Team's Remote Control System software can secretly eavesdrop on location data, text messages, email, phone, and Skype calls, grabbing the data before it can be encrypted. The article also explores the spread of the belief that "privacy is secrecy and secrecy is terrorism".
NY Times: http://nyti.ms/2ik90SC
 
 
***
 
DIARY
==============
To see more events recommended by the Information Program team, visit:
https://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:events/. If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.
 
Privacy Camp
----------------------------------------
January 24, 2017
Brussels, Belgium
Co-organised by EDRi, Privacy Salon, USL-B, and VUB-LSTS, the fifth annual Privacy Camp brings together civil society, policy makers, and academia to discuss existing and looming problems for human rights in the digital environment.
http://bit.ly/2evfpa9
 
Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection
----------------------------------------
January 25-27, 2017
Brussels, Belgium
The tenth CPDP's main theme is artificial intelligence. The conference is accepting proposals for panels in April (from academic consortia, research projects, think tanks, and other research organisations) and May (from individuals wishing to present academic research papers).
http://bit.ly/1OrQSv6
 
Internet Freedom Festival
----------------------------------------
March 6-10, 2017
Valencia, Spain
The Internet Freedom Festival gathers the community keeping the Internet open and uncensored for a week of free-form multidisciplinary collaboration intended to help groups achieve their goals. Attendance is free and open to the public.
http://bit.ly/2dI8EV1
 
Rightscon 2017
----------------------------------------
March 29-31, 2017
Brussels, Belgium
RightsCon will tackle the most pressing issues at the intersection of technology and human rights. 
http://bit.ly/I2ZAUZ
 
We Robot
----------------------------------------
March 31-April 1, 2017
New Haven, Connecticut
The sixth annual We Robot will be held at Yale Law School and will focus on the coming legal and policy conflicts as robots and AI become part of daily life.
http://bit.ly/2fVF2SI
 
TICTeC 2017
----------------------------------------
April 25-26, 2017
Florence, Italy
This will be the third mySociety conference on the impacts of civic technology.
http://bit.ly/2e5NifJ
 
2017 IFLA International News Media Conference
----------------------------------------
April 27-28, 2017
Reykjavik, Iceland
This conference will examine issues and challenges in collecting and preserving the news and making it available to users. Do access and preservation have different prerequisites? In addition, the conference will explore how news media is used and transformed by researchers and the public. Can we recognize variable user needs? Do we offer the most suitable APIs? 
http://bit.ly/2gjYmu2
 
Creative Commons Global Summit
----------------------------------------
April 28-30, 2017
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
This event will gather a global community of technologists, academics, activists, creatives, and legal experts to work together on the expansion and growth of the commons, open knowledge, and free culture for all. 
http://bit.ly/2cO3x0P
 
MetLib 2017
----------------------------------------
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
The 2017 programme theme is "Partnerships: Creating a new vision for libraries". Among the subthemes will be discussions of how and why to use, form, and manage partnerships, management tools, and best practices. 
http://bit.ly/2ghPOPp
 
4th Africa Library Summit and 2nd AfLIA conference
----------------------------------------
May 14-20, 2017
Yaounde, Cameroon
Moved from Ethiopia to the site of the second bidder due to safety concerns, this conference co-locates the fourth Africa Library Sumit and the second African Library and Information Associations and Institutions conference.
http://bit.ly/2hsw64E
 
IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy
----------------------------------------
May 22-24, 2017
San Jose, California
The 38th annual meeting will present developments in computer security and electronic privacy, and for bringing together researchers and practitioners in the field. 
http://bit.ly/2hsqUhj
 
Workshop on Technology and Consumer Protection 
----------------------------------------
May 22-24, 2017
San Jose, California
Co-hosted with the IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy, ConPro will explore computer science topics with an impact on consumers. This workshop has a strong security and privacy slant, with an overall focus on ways in which computer science can prevent, detect, or address the potential for technology to deceive or unfairly harm consumers. 
http://bit.ly/2fJ6ShN
 
Next Library Festival 2017
----------------------------------------
June 11-14, 2017
Aarhus, Denmark
Next Library 2017 will offer a "patchwork" of co-learning, co-creative, participatory, engaging, pluralistic and interactive meetings, and lots of parallel sessions, keynote speakers, wildcard sessions, demos/exhibitions, gaming, Networking Dinner Party, Get2Gether, Social un-conferences, alternative events and surprises.
http://bit.ly/2hHNt4W
 
Open Repositories 2017
----------------------------------------
June 26-30, 2017
Brisbane, Australia
The annual Open Repositories Conference brings together users and developers of open digital repository platforms from higher education, government, galleries, libraries, archives and museums. The Conference provides an interactive forum for delegates from around the world to come together and explore the global challenges and opportunities facing libraries and the broader scholarly information landscape.
http://bit.ly/2aOCiGp
 
IFLA World Libraries and Information Congress
----------------------------------------
August 19-25, 2017
Wroclaw, Poland
The theme of the 83rd annual IFLA congress will be "Achieving a healthy future together: diverse and emerging roles for health information professionals". 
http://bit.ly/2gErkVa
 
Privacy + Security Forum
----------------------------------------
October 4-6, 2017
Washington, DC
The conference breaks down the silos of security and privacy by bringing together leaders from both fields. 
http://bit.ly/1PZhExo
 
***
 
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================================
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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 
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Open Society Foundation, part of the Open Society Foundations, is a company limited by guarantee registered in England and Wales (company number 4571628) and a registered charity (charity number 1105069). Its registered office address is 7th Floor, Millbank Tower, 21-24 Millbank, London SW1P 4QP
 
 
 
Update (1/4/2017): corrected Mor Rubinstein's spelling and gender.

News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week ending 23 December 2016
====================================================
The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF. Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

Our staff, advisers and major grantees tweet at http://bit.ly/13j5fjq. Current and former grantees featured in this issue: EDRi, EFF, La Quadrature du Net, Open Rights Group, Privacy International, Tactical Tech.

PROGRAM NEWS

Life in a Quantified Society
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The Open Society Foundation has published a basic guide to its work on the Quantified Society, explaining the underpinning technologies and their impact on individuals' everyday lives. Topics include pervasive data collection, algorithmic decision-making, and the problems these pose for accountability and open access to information.
https://osf.to/2hTp3Ub


NEWS
=====
For breaking news stories, visit: http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:news/

UK: European Court of Justice rules UK bulk data collection illegal
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The Open Rights Group reports that the European Court of Justice has ruled that it is illegal for governments to indiscriminately collect emails and electronic communications in bulk. The ruling may trigger legal challenges to Britain's newly-passed Investigatory Powers Act. Other key points of the judgment: no blanket data retention; notification of the persons affected after the investigation has concluded; limitation to serious crime; independent authorisation. The case, which was backed by ORG, Privacy International, Liberty, and the Law Society, was originally brought by the MPs Tom Watson and David Davis against the 2014 Data Retention and Investigatory Powers Act. Davis was forced to drop out when he joined the present government as Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union.
ORG: http://bit.ly/2ifnU8j
Judgement: http://bit.ly/2ha0TpD

Uber launches self-driving cars in San Francisco
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The San Francisco Examiner reports that shortly after Uber sent its self-driving cars out on the streets of San Francisco for the first time, one of the cars was caught on video apparently running a red light, one of two near-accidents that have been reported involving these cars. Uber calls the incidents "driver error", and, the New York Times reports, continues to refuse to apply for permits for the cars, despite orders to do so from the California Department of Motor Vehicles. Uber argues that because the cars have human drivers present, permits are not required. Reveal News reports that in a deposition filed in a lawsuit he has brought, the company's former forensic investigator, Ward Spangenberg, says that company employees can and do spy on customers. Spangenberg claims he was fired for objecting to Uber's illegal and reckless practices.
SF Examiner: http://bit.ly/2h1IVSR
NY Times: http://nyti.ms/2hcrbsS
Reveal News: http://bit.ly/2h9V7Ei

OpenStreetView project seeks to rival Google
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The Register reports that Telenav, a supporter of the OpenStreetMap project, has launched OpenStreetView, a project intended to create an open source version of Google's Street View. Contributors use the OpenStreetView software to upload images from GoPro cameras or Android phones fitted with OBD2 dongles that fit into the port supplied on newer cars. So far, contributors have uploaded 40,000 kilometres' worth of images. The Register notes that the effort is at an early stage, and other such projects have been tried before only to fizzle.
Register: http://bit.ly/2hcsJDj

US: President-elect Donald Trump meets tech leaders
----------------------------------------------------------------------
ReCode's Kara Swisher reports on the meeting US President-elect Donald Trump called with tech company leaders including Jeff Bezos (Amazon), Satya Nadella (Microsoft), Tim Cook (Apple), Sheryl Sandberg (Facebook), Larry Page (Google), Elon Musk (Tesla), and Peter Thiel. Twitter was notably not invited. In a piece written when the meeting was announced, Swisher argued that these leaders should stand up for the social and democratic values they have often claimed to represent. Afterwards, she reported on the subjects the group actually raised: the need for more H1B visas to enable foreign workers to come to the US; STEM education; maternity leave; China; infrastructure spending; and the tax treatment of repatriated assets. EFF suggests that if Trump really wants to help these companies he should adopt policies that protect users and innovation from policies that threaten privacy, civil liberties, and a free internet. At Medium, Ben Rattray, CEO and founder of Change.org, discusses the changes technology platforms need to make to satisfy the public's genuine civic needs.
ReCode (before): http://on.recode.net/2h1GeAG
ReCode (after): http://on.recode.net/2i0ESaX
EFF: http://bit.ly/2h9Snqo
Medium: http://bit.ly/2hTuy4U

Germany: Universities sever Elsevier subscriptions
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Intellectual Property Watch reports that more than 60 German universities are preparing to lose access on January 1 to hundreds of journals published by Elsevier after failing to reach agreement on pricing and licensing. British scientists have filed a complaint over market abuse. Overall, 16,000 scientists have signed a pledge to cease providing articles or conducting peer review for Elsevier, following a call by mathematician Tim Gowers in 2012, though Frontiers in Research Metrics and Analytics estimates that as many as 38% may have continued to publish. Kiwi reports that Finland, where the FinELib consortium of libraries and universities continues to negotiate, may wind up in the same situation as Germany.
IPW: http://bit.ly/2hHLpKe
FIRMA: http://bit.ly/2hV2DEh
Kiwi: http://bit.ly/2ifjoXs


FEATURES AND ANALYSIS
====================
For more features and analysis selected by the Program team, visit:
http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:oped/

Fighting back against the "war on cash"
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this posting at The Long and Short, Brett Scott argues that it's essential to fight back against "the war on cash", as the cashless society will see all transactions intermediated, and says that we should be concerned for those who will be excluded and left behind by such a system. Venezuela and India provide cases in point, as both have abruptly "demonetised" some of their higher-value notes. Mashable reports on the resulting currency crunch in India, and also finds that deaths have resulted when hospitals, ambulances, and pharmacies have refused to accept the old money. The Economic Times reports on the more chaotic situation in Venezuela, where the much less popular government discontinued the highest-value bank note on three days' notice before replacements were ready.
Long and Short: http://bit.ly/2d1pa11
Mashable: http://on.mash.to/2h1IKqI
Economic Times: http://bit.ly/2hrelmu

Fake news and how to stop it
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this podcast at Radio Berkman, Zeynep Tufecki and Jonathan Zittrain discuss the mechanics of fake news dissemination and express concern about some of the strategies proposed to combat it. At his blog, science fiction writer Charlie Stross kicks off a wide-ranging, multi-faceted discussion with eleven tweets that explain why Twitter and fake news were made for each other. In an interview with National Public Radio, Buzzfeed editor Craig Silverman discloses the results of his site's investigation: the vast majority are funded via Google's AdSense. At the Guardian, Carole Cadwalladr finds out how to bump the neo-Nazi, white supremacist group Stormfront off the top of Google's search results for "Did the Holocaust happen?": buy an ad. In her recent documentary, The Brainwashing of My Dad, filmmaker Jen Senko studies the development of the right-wing media machine built in the US over the last several decades, basing its success on emotion over facts.
Radio Berkman: http://bit.ly/2hrdF0x
Stross: http://bit.ly/2h9P4zH
NPR: http://n.pr/2ialY4X
Guardian: http://bit.ly/2iaxUUn
Senko: http://bit.ly/2ifqevS

Open Government Partnership Summit in review
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting at OKFN, Mor Rubinstein reviews this year's Open Government Partnership Summit. Rubinstein praises better gender diversity but is concerned at the absence of government ministers and the relative silence of UK civil society. The latter leads her to point to a recent posting at CivicHall by mySociety co-founder Tom Steinberg, who argues that open data efforts to date have been too polite and constructively collaborative; transparency, Steinberg writes, is only ever beaten out of governments with a stick.
OKFN: http://bit.ly/2iavapN
CivicHall: http://bit.ly/2hrffPU

Google, the EU, and antitrust
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article at the Harvard Business Review, Bala Iyer and U. Srinivasa Rangan discuss Google's defence against the European Commission's charges that the company unfairly advantages its own shopping service over those of competitors; uses its AdSense service to improperly restrict third-party websites from displaying ads served up by competitors; and exploits the dominant position of its Android operating system. The authors believe Google has mounted an effective rebuttal to the first two charges but believe to prevail on the third Google will need to argue that competition in the mobile space is qualitatively different. Specifically, they suggest that antitrust law needs to change to accept that a company isn't dominant in the classical sense simply because it is dominant in one ecosystem; winners can change at any time when newer innovation appears.
Harvard: http://bit.ly/2hcBxZU

AI snake oil, fake tech, good stories, and uncritical media
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting, the first of a series, Dan Simon discusses how to tell if the claims someone is making for artificial intelligence software are true. The questions he suggests asking include: where the training data will come from and whether an evaluation procedure is built in. At ReCode, Phil Baker discusses "fake tech" using the recent failures of Magic Leap and Theranos as examples. Magic Leap, an augmented reality company, hired a New Zealand special effects company to create video simulations it claimed were genuine product demonstrations, netting it $1.9 billion in funding. Theranos claimed to be able to conduct dozens of tests from the tiny amounts of blood collected from a finger stick; its value topped $9 billion before its claims were discredited earlier this year. Vanity Fair's Nick Bilton tells the Theranos story in detail, starting with the scepticism of Wall Street Journal reporter John Carreyrou when confronted with the company's refusal to disclose to either investors or scientists how its medical technology worked. Both Baker and Bilton argue that what's needed is a more critical, better-trained technology press.
Dan Simon: http://bit.ly/2hcELwi
ReCode: http://on.recode.net/2iateOd
Vanity Fair (Theranos): http://bit.ly/2hTubrj
Vanity Fair (press): http://bit.ly/2hcviVX

The Glass Room
----------------------------------------------------------------------
On these web pages, Tactical Tech wraps up its Glass Room exhibition, which sought to demonstrate to visitors the data collection present in everyday life. The site provides photographs, interviews with visitors, and a "data detox kit" to help individuals identify and limit the many sources of data collection in their lives.
Tactical Tech: http://bit.ly/2hTvwOZ

China: Building the world's first digital totalitarian state
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article, The Economist outlines the "digital totalitarian state" that China is building via its "social credit" system. Although a 2014 pilot scheme in Suining county, north of Shanghai, was a failure, about 30 governments are collecting data to support the system. By 2020, the Chinese government intends the system to "allow the trustworthy to roam everywhere under heaven while making it hard for the discredited to take a single step". The Economist foresees two big hurdles for a surveillance system at such a scale: first, the quality of data; second, the ability to analyse it. Nonetheless, it concludes, many of the pieces are ready.
Economist: http://econ.st/2hUWdVC

Facebook content reviews
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article at Süddeutsche Zeitung Magazin, Till Krause and Hannes Grassegger talk to members of the 600-person Berlin-based team, employed by Bertelsmann subsidiary Arvato, that reviews content at Facebook. Many report struggling with psychological issues due to their exposure to images of torture, murder, and child abuse coupled with their lack of training or support. They also discuss the unclear and inconsistent rules of deletion they must follow and other stresses of their jobs
SDZ Magazin: http://bit.ly/2hHEb8U

The 3D printing revolution that wasn't
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article at Medium's Backchannel, Andrew Zaleski analyses the failure of MakerBot, which bet unsuccessfully that 3D printers would become as ubiquitous as microwave ovens. What began as an open source company, he writes, over-extended when it acquired venture capital funding and became closed-source after its acquisition in 2013 by Stratasys. The market for home desktop 3D printers has never reached the levels MakerBot founder Bre Prettis thought they would, and the difficulties of design mean it possibly never will. Last year, 270,000 desktop 3D printers were sold, but nearly all went to schools and businesses.
Backchannel: http://bit.ly/2i0zTqO


***

DIARY
==============
To see more events recommended by the Information Program team, visit:
https://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:events/. If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

Privacy Camp
----------------------------------------
January 24, 2017
Brussels, Belgium
Co-organised by EDRi, Privacy Salon, USL-B, and VUB-LSTS, the fifth annual Privacy Camp brings together civil society, policy makers, and academia to discuss existing and looming problems for human rights in the digital environment.
http://bit.ly/2evfpa9

Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection
----------------------------------------
January 25-27, 2017
Brussels, Belgium
The tenth CPDP's main theme is artificial intelligence. The conference is accepting proposals for panels in April (from academic consortia, research projects, think tanks, and other research organisations) and May (from individuals wishing to present academic research papers).
http://bit.ly/1OrQSv6

Internet Freedom Festival
----------------------------------------
March 6-10, 2017
Valencia, Spain
The Internet Freedom Festival gathers the community keeping the Internet open and uncensored for a week of free-form multidisciplinary collaboration intended to help groups achieve their goals. Attendance is free and open to the public.
http://bit.ly/2dI8EV1

Rightscon 2017
----------------------------------------
March 29-31, 2017
Brussels, Belgium
RightsCon will tackle the most pressing issues at the intersection of technology and human rights. Session proposals are being accepted until November 25, 2016.
http://bit.ly/I2ZAUZ

We Robot
----------------------------------------
March 31-April 1, 2017
New Haven, Connecticut
The sixth annual We Robot will be held at Yale Law School and will focus on the coming legal and policy conflicts as robots and AI become part of daily life.
http://bit.ly/2fVF2SI

TICTeC 2017
----------------------------------------
April 25-26, 2017
Florence, Italy
This will be the third mySociety conference on the impacts of civic technology.
http://bit.ly/2e5NifJ

2017 IFLA International News Media Conference
----------------------------------------
April 27-28, 2017
Reykjavik, Iceland
This conference will examine issues and challenges in collecting and preserving the news and making it available to users. Do access and preservation have different prerequisites? In addition, the conference will explore how news media is used and transformed by researchers and the public. Can we recognize variable user needs? Do we offer the most suitable APIs?
http://bit.ly/2gjYmu2

Creative Commons Global Summit
----------------------------------------
April 28-30, 2017
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
This event will gather a global community of technologists, academics, activists, creatives, and legal experts to work together on the expansion and growth of the commons, open knowledge, and free culture for all.
http://bit.ly/2cO3x0P

MetLib 2017
----------------------------------------
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
The 2017 programme theme is "Partnerships: Creating a new vision for libraries". Among the subthemes will be discussions of how and why to use, form, and manage partnerships, management tools, and best practices.
http://bit.ly/2ghPOPp

4th Africa Library Summit and 2nd AfLIA conference
----------------------------------------
May 14-20, 2017
Yaounde, Cameroon
Moved from Ethiopia to the site of the second bidder due to safety concerns, this conference co-locates the fourth Africa Library Sumit and the second African Library and Information Associations and Institutions conference.
http://bit.ly/2hsw64E

IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy
----------------------------------------
May 22-24, 2017
San Jose, California
The 38th annual meeting will present developments in computer security and electronic privacy, and for bringing together researchers and practitioners in the field.
http://bit.ly/2hsqUhj

Workshop on Technology and Consumer Protection
----------------------------------------
May 22-24, 2017
San Jose, California
Co-hosted with the IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy, ConPro will explore computer science topics with an impact on consumers. This workshop has a strong security and privacy slant, with an overall focus on ways in which computer science can prevent, detect, or address the potential for technology to deceive or unfairly harm consumers.
http://bit.ly/2fJ6ShN

Next Library Festival 2017
----------------------------------------
June 11-14, 2017
Aarhus, Denmark
Next Library 2017 will offer a "patchwork" of co-learning, co-creative, participatory, engaging, pluralistic and interactive meetings, and lots of parallel sessions, keynote speakers, wildcard sessions, demos/exhibitions, gaming, Networking Dinner Party, Get2Gether, Social un-conferences, alternative events and surprises.
http://bit.ly/2hHNt4W

Open Repositories 2017
----------------------------------------
June 26-30, 2017
Brisbane, Australia
The annual Open Repositories Conference brings together users and developers of open digital repository platforms from higher education, government, galleries, libraries, archives and museums. The Conference provides an interactive forum for delegates from around the world to come together and explore the global challenges and opportunities facing libraries and the broader scholarly information landscape.
http://bit.ly/2aOCiGp

IFLA World Libraries and Information Congress
----------------------------------------
August 19-25, 2017
Wroclaw, Poland
The theme of the 83rd annual IFLA congress will be "Achieving a healthy future together: diverse and emerging roles for health information professionals".
http://bit.ly/2gErkVa

Privacy + Security Forum
----------------------------------------
October 4-6, 2017
Washington, DC
The conference breaks down the silos of security and privacy by bringing together leaders from both fields.
http://bit.ly/1PZhExo

***

Hear more from the Information Program!
================================
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