News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week of 29 July 2016
====================================================

The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF. Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

Our staff, advisers and major grantees tweet at http://bit.ly/13j5fjq. Current and former grantees featured in this issue: EFF, La Quadrature du Net.


NEWS
=====
For breaking news stories, visit: http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:news/

US: Microsoft wins jurisdictional dispute
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The Center for Democracy and Technology reports that the US Second Circuit Court has ruled that Microsoft does not have to turn over emails stored on its Irish servers to US law enforcement seeking to compel disclosure. The ruling, which the Department of Justice may appeal to the Supreme Court, is widely seen as setting an important jurisdictional precedent. It is also an important victory for Microsoft, which argues that the US government should use the Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty (MLAT) to obtain the data and promotes the idea that storing data locally will ensure that data of Europeans are subject to Europe's more stringent privacy laws. However, UCL security researcher Steven Murdoch argues that the ruling will give false assurance to customers of US companies, because other circumstances might produce a different decision by US courts. Within days of the ruling, Gizmodo reported that President Barack Obama has proposed a plan to allow the US and UK to access data stored on servers in each other's countries as long as the searches were only for data relating to citizens of the country doing the searching. Both countries would need legislative approval.
CDT: http://bit.ly/2azvJXY
Murdoch: http://bit.ly/2axUD8C
ACLU: http://bit.ly/2axUEcN
Gizmodo: http://bit.ly/2akUEcH

France extends State of Emergency until January 2017
----------------------------------------------------------------------
La Quadrature du Net reports that in response to the Nice attacks the French government has extended the State of Emergency until January 2017 and amended the 2015 Intelligence Act to legalise domestic mass surveillance. The new provision extends real-time monitoring of communications data from individuals who had been "identified as a [terrorist] threat" - such as the 11,700 people with an "S-File" linked with radical Islamism - to anyone "likely related to a threat" or belonging to the entourage of someone so identified.
LQDN: http://bit.ly/2a2NWfq

Russia accused of interfering in US presidential elections
----------------------------------------------------------------------
As the Democratic national convention begins in Philadelphia, at Motherboard Thomas Rid, a Kings College London professor and author of Cyberwar Will Not Take Place, studies the evidence for attributing to state-sponsored Russian hackers the breach of the Democratic National Committee's server, which also exposed the organisation's opposition research on the Trump campaign. Rid sees the attack as setting a dangerous precedent for electronic interference by one country in the elections of another. Engadget confirms that the FBI is investigating the DNC email hack and is auditing the DNC's Republican counterpart, where no such hack has yet been reported. CNN reports that Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov has dismissed the claim, and reviews the history of the breach. The Guardian outlines Russian support for Donald Trump. On July 22, Wikileaks published the collection of 19,234 emails taken from DNC servers as the second in its "Hillary Leaks" series (the first was a collection of emails from Hillary Clinton's home server). On July 25, the Guardian reported that the emails' exposure of DNC leaders' active favouritism for Hillary Clinton over Bernie Sanders has forced the resignation of DNC chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz.
Motherboard: http://bit.ly/2a2OMbR
Engadget: http://engt.co/2au3Sp8
CNN: http://cnn.it/2aBpE9U
Guardian (Trump): http://bit.ly/2aAqk29
Guardian (Schultz): http://bit.ly/2agJll0

Turkey, US: Critics accuse Wikileaks of publishing confidential personal information
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Gizmodo reports that the 19,234 emails from Democratic National Committee members posted online by Wikileaks include the credit card, Social Security, and passport numbers of many small individual donors - a treasure trove for identity fraudsters, a fact easily checked via Gizmodo's published search method. Meanwhile, at the Huffington Post, Zeynep Tufecki examines Wikileaks' previously published "AKP Email Archive", obtained a week before the attempted coup, published shortly afterwards, and almost immediately blocked by the Turkish internet authority, and finds nothing that serves the public interest. However, she reports that among related files to which Wikileaks linked are massive databases of highly sensitive personal information about millions of Turkish individuals. One such includes almost every adult woman in Turkey, giving real - and correct as far as Tufecki could check- home addresses, mobile phone numbers, and affiliation with AKP, the group that attempted to overthrow the government. "There is not a single good reason to put so many men and women in such danger of identity theft, harassment and worse," she concludes. On Twitter, Wikileaks responded: "The story is fabricated by an Erdogan apologist in Turkey. We have already lodged a complaint with Arianna Huffington." Soon afterwards, national security blogger Michael Best came forward to explain how the files were obtained and take responsibility for their release (he has deleted the bittorrent instance he created on the Internet Archive server to distribute them, the link Wikileaks promoted). "What happened was a perfect storm of events that I could have prevented, and wish I had," he writes.
Gizmodo: http://bit.ly/2ar17Xf
Huffington Post: http://huff.to/2akVpCw
Best: http://bit.ly/2agYWHl

US: EFF challenges Digital Millennium Copyright Act
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Based on 20 years of collected evidence, EFF has announced that it is mounting a new legal challenge to Section 1201 of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, which the EFF has opposed ever since its passage in 1998. The law, EFF argues, is unconstitutional because it impedes security research, blocks remixes, and inhibits the use of fair use rights. "Copyright law," EFF adds in a second posting, "shouldn't be casting a legal shadow over activities as basic as popping the hood of your own car, offering commentary on a shared piece of culture (and helping others do so), and testing security infrastructure."
EFF: http://bit.ly/2afobd1

Historical data leads to Kickass Torrents owner's arrest
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Torrentfreak reports that the alleged owner of Kickass Torrents (KAT), the world's largest torrent site, has been arrested in Poland on a request from US authorities, and is waiting to learn if he will be extradited. Several types of data led investigators to Artem Vaulin: historical Whois records for early KAT domains showing his name, and cross-referencing that showed the same IP address was used to log into KAT's Facebook account and to conduct transactions on iTunes. In the criminal complaint, Business Insider finds the reason behind KAT's near-immediate access to copies of movies, often within days of their original release: conversion using a telecine machine, which directly converts cinema reels to digital file - a method that implies insider access. Torrentfreak also reports that Gary Fung, the Canadian founder of the now-defunct torrent site Isohunt, has settled with the music industry for $66 million.
TorrentFreak (KAT): http://bit.ly/2agISz4
Business Insider: http://read.bi/2aNr9Bk
TorrentFreak (Fung): http://bit.ly/2ar1kcY


FEATURES AND ANALYSIS
====================
For more features and analysis selected by the Program team, visit:
http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:oped/

Best case scenarios for copyright: education
----------------------------------------------------------------------
As part of Communia's effort to document best case scenarios for copyright, in this article Teresa Nobre and Alari Rammo discuss the educational exceptions in the Estonian Copyright Act, which were adopted in 1992. These include the free use of copyrighted works for scientific, educational, informational, and judicial purposes and allow public performances of protected works in front of limited school-related audiences. Estonia's approach, they write, has led to "a relatively abstract norm that allows for a broad spectrum of unauthorised uses" that is similar to open-ended defences like the US Fair Use doctrine. The authors suggest, however, that Estonia's law could be improved as two exceptions overlap, causing issues of interpretation.
Communia (PDF): http://bit.ly/2aj5kLa

Refugees and communication
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this three-minute video clip, best watched on a mobile phone, the BBC shows the importance of mobile phones to refugees, who struggle to identify their location, reunite with dispersed family and friends, and find safety. The idea was inspired by the stories the BBC collected in researching the communications needs of those fleeing their countries. Alongside the clip is a research report written from in-depth interviews with 79 refugees and 45 humanitarian actors studying refugees' communication behaviours and information needs during their journey, in Greek transit camps, and in Germany.
BBC: http://bbc.in/2aeuQ28

Legal analysis of Pokémon Go
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting at Freedom to Tinker, Tiffany Li offers a legal analysis of the issues surrounding the sudden popularity of Pokémon Go, which has spawned stories of absorbed users falling off cliffs and hitting a police car and privacy violations when private locations are misidentified on the map as gyms. Li examines Pokémon owner Niantic's liability for injuries, the privacy implications of the amount of information the Pokémon app requires, and intellectual property and trespass concerns. These issues, Li concludes are not specific to Pokémon Go; they will apply to any augmented reality game. Bitchmedia reports on a novel use of the game by the Clinton campaign: to lure unregistered voters to volunteers who help them register.
Freedom to Tinker: http://bit.ly/2adaozE
Bitchmedia: http://bit.ly/2ahI3t5

UK: The referendum and the future
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting for the Open Government Partnership, Birkbeck College lecturer in politics Ben Worthy discusses the likely future of open government for the post-EU UK. Brexit itself, he writes, will soon become a transparency issue as negotiators seek to balance the advantages of keeping their goals confidential with the need to reassure Leave voters that their goals have not been sold out. At the London Review of Books, John Lanchester mulls how an idea that was considered lunatic fringe in 1997 became a mainstream reality in 2016: today, he writes, geography matters more than class, the white working class has been abandoned, and the divisions between the two main parties do not reflect at all the economic divisions that dominate many people's thinking.
Open Government Partnership: http://bit.ly/2a7GwDc
London Review of Books: http://bit.ly/2a2PplJ

Burkina Faso: Reconstructing history
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting at mySociety, Dave Whiteland writes about EveryPolitician's ambition to provide data about every politician in the world and Teg-Wende Idriss Tinto's efforts to reconstruct the history of Burkina Faso's Parliament, which was lost when insurgents set a fire in the National Assembly building in 2014, destroying 90% of the country's records. Tinto is appealing for assistance from anyone with information on the members of Burkina Faso's parliament from independence in 1960 until 1992.
https://www.mysociety.org/2016/07/15/everypolitician-and-historic-data/
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/pmo-network/NhNUqkl8UoY/MS754DJvAQAJ

If financial systems were hacked
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article, part of its "The World If" series, The Economist imagines what would happen if the global financial infrastructure were attacked, for example, via clearing houses or payments systems. To date, cyberattacks have focused on single banks. In this scenario, however, the attack might begin by tweaking numbers so that the clearing houses can't settle up at the end of each day. Ultimately, the system needs to plan for response-and-recovery instead of assuming that their security is sufficient to ensure that such attacks cannot happen. Other scenarios in the series include terrorist access to nuclear weapons, states trading territories, and universal drone ownership.
Economist (finance): http://bit.ly/2agJPaC
Economist (WorldIf): http://bit.ly/2azxaWi


***

DIARY
==============
To see more events recommended by the Information Program team, visit:
https://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:events/. If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

21st-Century Literacies for Public Libraries
----------------------------------------
August 10-11, 2016
Philadelphia, PA
At this two-day satellite meeting, presented by IFLA's Public Libraries Section, delegates will share and learn from each other's experiences in developing and delivering services that encompass today's expanded concept of literacy, which includes not only the traditional ability to read and write but proficiency in a range of other literacies such as civic, health, financial, digital, and information.
http://bit.ly/1PZhExo

IFLA World Library and Information Congress
---------------------#-------------------
August 13-19, 2016
Columbus, OH
The theme of the 82nd IFLA Congress is "Connections. Collaboration. Community." The Congress will feature programmes from myriad library sectors.
http://bit.ly/2a79a8p

Chinese Institutional Repository Conference
----------------------------------------
ChongQing City, China
September 21-22, 2016
Hosted by the National Science Library, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and the Library of ChongQing University, the fourth Chinese IR Conference will feature EIFL open access programme manager Iryna Kuchma, who will speak about global open access repository developments and trends.
http://bit.ly/2afoULf

State of the Map
----------------------------------------
September 23-26, 2016
Brussels, Belgium
Talks, discussions and workshops, code and documentation sprints, all to improve the collaborative OpenStreetMap project.
http://bit.ly/28Z6Hxl

International Open Data Conference
----------------------------------------
October 6-7
Madrid, Spain
At IODC16, governments, civil society, multilateral organisations, and private companies will gather around a roadmap. the International Open Data Charter, in order to keep improving the governability, citizen engagement, innovation, and international development of open data initiatives.
http://bit.ly/1HQuPNW

Privacy+Security Forum
----------------------------------------
October 24-26, 2016
Washington, DC
Monday, October 24, is devoted to pre-conference workshops and "intensive days" - advanced discussion focused narrowly on a particular topic or industry. Proposals are welcome until April 30, 2016 based on the following guiding principles: bridge the silos between privacy and security; cover issues with depth and rigour; employ interaction, scenario-based learning, and extensive engagement; deliver practical takeaways from each session.
http://bit.ly/1RIzYhV

ODI Summit
----------------------------------------
November 1, 2016
London, UK
The annual Open Data Institute Summit will feature inspiring stories from around the world on how people are innovating with the web of data, and presentations from diverse innovators, from current startup founders to experienced, high-profile speakers such as World Wide Web inventor Tim Berners-Lee, AI expert Nigel Shadbolt and Lastminute.com founder Martha Lane Fox.
http://bit.ly/2ar2aXf

ICANN 57
----------------------------------------
November 3-9, 2016
Hyderabad, India
ICANN meetings provide a venue for progressing policy work, conducting outreach, exchanging best practices, conducting business deals, interacting among members of the ICANN Community, including board and staff, and learning about ICANN.
http://bit.ly/29CmNg9

Mozilla Festival
----------------------------------------
November 6-8, 2016
London, UK
MozFest is an annual celebration of the open Web. Participants are diverse, including engineers, artists, activists, and educators, but share the common belief that the Web can make lives better, unlocks opportunity, spurs creativity, teaches valuable skills, and connects far-flung people and ideas. The Festival seeks to improve the Web with new ideas and creations.
http://bit.ly/1WmxRQ0

OpenCon
----------------------------------------
November 12-14, 2016
Washington, DC
At this event, the next generation can learn about Open Access, Open Education, and Open Data, develop critical skills, and catalyse action toward a more open system of research and education. OpenCon will convene students and early career academic professionals, both in person and through satellite events around the world and serve as a powerful catalyst for projects led by the next generation to advance OpenCon's three focus areas.
http://bit.ly/1OocSMD

Internet Governance Forum
----------------------------------------
December 6-9, 2016 (TBC)
Guadalajara, Mexico
With the UN's renewal in December 2015, the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) consolidates itself as a platform to bring people together from various stakeholder groups as equals, in discussions on public policy issues relating to the Internet. While there is no negotiated outcome, the IGF informs and inspires those with policy-making power in both the public and private sectors. At their annual meeting delegates discuss, exchange information and share good practices with each other.
http://bit.ly/28YwZPX

Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection
----------------------------------------
January 25-27, 2017
Brussels
The tenth CPDP's main theme is artificial intelligence. The conference is accepting proposals for panels in April (from academic consortia, research projects, think tanks, and other research organisations) and May (from individuals wishing to present academic research papers).
http://bit.ly/1OrQSv6

Rightscon 2017
----------------------------------------
March 29-31, 2017
Brussels, Belgium
RightsCon will tackle the most pressing issues at the intersection of technology and human rights.
http://bit.ly/I2ZAUZ


***

Hear more from the Information Program!
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News Digest | Open Society Information Program | Week of 15 July 2016
====================================================

The Information Program News Digest, published the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF. Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

Our staff, advisers and major grantees tweet at http://bit.ly/13j5fjq. Current and former grantees featured in this issue: EIFL, Open Rights Group, Privacy International, La Quadrature du Net.


PROGRAM NEWS
============

NEWS
=====
For breaking news stories, visit: http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:news/

UK: Amid referendum fallout, surveillance and copyright bills proceed
----------------------------------------------------------------------
As Theresa May assumes the premiership after two weeks of political uncertainty, the Open Rights Group reports that the government has introduced the Digital Economy bill as planned. Among its provisions are an increase in maximum prison terms for online copyright infringement from two years to ten; age verification for all commercial pornography websites; and increased data sharing across government. Separately, ORG analyses the impact of Britain's withdrawal from the EU on digital rights generally and the progress of the Investigatory Powers bill, which was debated in the House of Lords on July 11. Intellectual Property Watch reports that legal experts expect withdrawal to delay the introduction of the EU unitary patent and unified patent court and create uncertainty and added costs for trademark owners. Kenedict Innovation Analytics provides a network analysis and visualisation showing the likely impact on the UK's scientific research ecosystem.
ORG (DEB): http://bit.ly/29vQbmH
ORG (Brexit): http://bit.ly/29KWV3E
ORG (IP bill): http://bit.ly/29KWtCw
Parliament TV: http://bit.ly/29F2FfU
IP Watch: http://bit.ly/29CE4qW
Kenedict: http://bit.ly/29LDvvI

UN passes resolution condemning internet shutdowns
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Access Now reports that the United Nations Human Rights Council has passed a resolution condemning internet shutdowns and renewing its commitment to the principle that human rights apply online as much as they do offline. The resolution follows recent shutdowns in Turkey, Bahrain, and Algeria; the first half of 2016 has seen 20 such incidents, up from 15 for the year 2015. Ghana police have pulled back from a suggested social media shutdown for the November 2016 elections. IFEX reports that during recent protests in Zimbabwe, the country's main communications tool, WhatsApp, was disabled.
The #KeepItOn campaign includes civil society and human rights groups from around the world among its members.
Access Now: http://bit.ly/29LDvMk
IFEX: http://bit.ly/29zQ60R
#KeepItOn: http://bit.ly/29BXRUZ

Dallas police deploy 'killer robot'
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The Intercept reports that a standoff between police and a suspect in the Dallas shooting spree ended when law enforcement used a bomb disposal robot to deliver and detonate explosives to the suspect's hideout. The incident is believed to be the first-ever case of its kind outside a war zone. The Dallas Police Department has declined to provide details about the robot that was used. At Wired, Kim Zetter concludes that the robot was the only option for Dallas police and that the circumstances were unusual enough that weaponised robots are not likely to become the norm, though the New York Times argues that instead we should be concerned the incident will inspire other police forces to adopt this type of technology. At Fusion, Elmo Keep has identified the manufacturer of the robot in question as Northrop Grumman. In an interview at the Verge, We Robot co-founder Ryan Calo explores the ethics of autonomous weapons and why the Dallas case doesn't require new legal thinking.
Intercept: http://bit.ly/29vyIeW
Wired: http://bit.ly/29VgWpK
NY Times: http://nyti.ms/29wsiex
Fusion: http://fus.in/29FFvGf
The Verge: http://bit.ly/29VhLi2

Copyright licensing ends British Library's international non-commercial document service
----------------------------------------------------------------------
EIFL reports that as of July 1 the British Library has discontinued its international non-commercial document service, four and a half years after the service became licence-based instead of supported by a copyright exception. Data obtained by EIFL via a FOI request shows that the switch resulted in an immediate 93% drop in the number of available journal titles. A small percentage remained available at vastly more expensive commercial rates. The result was a precipitous 98% drop in the number of satisfied requests as well as the number of countries served. EIFL finds that the healthcare sector was particularly affected. EIFL concludes that a copyright exception for international inter-library document delivery is essential.
EIFL: http://bit.ly/29zSbcY

EU: European Commission adopts Privacy Shield
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Ars Technica reports that the the European Commission has adopted Privacy Shield to replace Safe Harbor as a framework under which personal data may be transferred from the EU to the US. It comes into force immediately. In an analysis of a leaked version shortly before the vote, Privacy International finds four major problems: 1) the agreement is opaque; 2) although the principles the Shield enshrines are improvements since Safe Harbor, they still fall short; 3) the safeguards are not sufficient legal protection; 4) the Ombudsperson created by the agreement is not fully independent and has very limited ability to provide redress.
Ars Technica: http://bit.ly/29zQxIz
PI: http://bit.ly/29H921e

EU: Web content blocking incorporated into draft anti-terrorism law
----------------------------------------------------------------------
La Quadrature du Net reports that on July 5 the LIBE Committee adopted the draft Directive on Combating Terrorism, which it says incorporates the "worst anti-terrorism and surveillance laws from across the European Union" into a single directive. LQDN is particularly concerned about the "blank check" approach to extending web blocking measures across the EU, and believes that the directive profoundly undermines fundamental rights.
LQDN: http://bit.ly/29H91uf


FEATURES AND ANALYSIS
====================
For more features and analysis selected by the Program team, visit:
http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:oped/

Belarus: The police officer in your pocket
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this report based on interviews with more than 50 human rights activists, journalists, lawyers, technology experts, and others, Amnesty International finds that Belarusian telecom companies, despite their foreign ownership, grant the government nearly unlimited access to their customers' communications and data and that activists say the result is a culture of fear in which it's safest to assume that everything they say will reach the KGB. "People's mobile phones are now like police officers in their pockets," Joshua Franco tells AI.
Amnesty: http://bit.ly/29Bzdce

The blockchain patent gold rush
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article at Fusion, Elmo Keep finds that patents are being filed on blockchain applications by dozens of claimants including some major corporations such as Bank of America. As Keep notes, the patents, if granted, could translate into very substantial profits, none of which will accrue to the original inventor, who released bitcoin without such protection.
Fusion: http://fus.in/29BzXxX

Internet governance in transition
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this video clip, cyber rights lawyer Mike Godwin hosts a panel to debate US plans to let go its control of internet governance functions and the legislation introduced by US Senator Ted Cruz (R-Texas) and Representative Sean Duffy (R-Wisconsin) to delay transition. The panellists include experts from the R Street Institute, Mercatus Center, NTIA, TechFreedom, the Heritage Foundation, and the Internet Infrastructure Coalition. Delay might provide the time to answer some stubborn and unsolved questions such as jurisdiction but create increased international distrust in the process.
https://youtu.be/aD4ttZCQpEE

The future of copyright according to Julia Reda
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this speech (video and transcript) given at the CREATe Festival, MEP Julia Reda discusses the proposed copyright exception for text and data mining and argues that the evidence base CREATe has been developing suggests what's needed is a paradigm shift rather than continued patching of existing law. Change will require much international collaboration: "National sovereignty in a globalized world is an illusion." Other videos from the Festival include discussions of business models and the role of online intermediaries.
Reda: http://bit.ly/29Vi6RX
CREATe: http://bit.ly/29BzN9S

The proposed Code of Ethics for Human Augmentation
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting at KurzweilAI.net, University of Toronto professor Steve Mann and a host of others propose a Code of Ethics for Human Augmentation. Presented at the VRTO Virtual and Augmented Reality World Conference 2016, the Code includes three "laws": humans have the right to know when and how they're being surveilled; humans should not be discouraged from monitoring the entities monitoring them; and humans have an affirmative right to audit information recorded about them - and "must not design machines of malice". Mann, the earliest pioneer in wearable computing, is asking for contributions to improve the next version of the code, which he intends to submit to IEEE on July 22, 2016. In a special report, The Economist considers the state of artificial intelligence with pieces on "automation anxiety" and progress in neural networking,
KurzweilAI: http://bit.ly/29H8SqZ
Economist: http://econ.st/29PdeLo

Can we design sociotechnical systems that don't suck?
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting, Ethan Zuckerman discusses the common tendency to attempt to solve social problems by smothering them with technology. His specific target is an essay that argued that the problem of prison violence could be solved by isolating each prisoner in an individual cell and providing social interaction through Oculus Rift VR headsets. Zuckerman uses the essay - and the widespread "hate-linking" it's encountered - to ask: "how do we help smart, well-meaning people address social problems in ways that make the world better, not worse?"
Zuckerman: http://bit.ly/2a74oIp


***

DIARY
==============
To see more events recommended by the Information Program team, visit:
https://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:events/. If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

21st-Century Literacies for Public Libraries
----------------------------------------
August 10-11, 2016
Philadelphia, PA
At this two-day satellite meeting, presented by IFLA's Public Libraries Section, delegates will share and learn from each other's experiences in developing and delivering services that encompass today's expanded concept of literacy, which includes not only the traditional ability to read and write but proficiency in a range of other literacies such as civic, health, financial, digital, and information.
http://bit.ly/1PZhExo

IFLA World Library and Information Congress
---------------------#-------------------
August 13-19, 2016
Columbus, OH
The theme of the 82nd IFLA Congress is "Connections. Collaboration. Community." The Congress will feature programmes from myriad library sectors.
http://bit.ly/2a79a8p

State of the Map
----------------------------------------
September 23-26, 2016
Brussels, Belgium
Talks, discussions and workshops, code and documentation sprints, all to improve the collaborative OpenStreetMap project.
http://bit.ly/28Z6Hxl

Privacy+Security Forum
----------------------------------------
October 24-26, 2016
Washington, DC
Monday, October 24, is devoted to pre-conference workshops and "intensive days" - advanced discussion focused narrowly on a particular topic or industry. Proposals are welcome until April 30, 2016 based on the following guiding principles: bridge the silos between privacy and security; cover issues with depth and rigour; employ interaction, scenario-based learning, and extensive engagement; deliver practical takeaways from each session.
http://bit.ly/1RIzYhV

ICANN 57
----------------------------------------
November 3-9, 2016
Hyderabad, India
ICANN meetings provide a venue for progressing policy work, conducting outreach, exchanging best practices, conducting business deals, interacting among members of the ICANN Community, including board and staff, and learning about ICANN.
http://bit.ly/29CmNg9

Mozilla Festival
----------------------------------------
November 6-8, 2016
London, UK
MozFest is an annual celebration of the open Web. Participants are diverse, including engineers, artists, activists, and educators, but share the common belief that the Web can make lives better, unlocks opportunity, spurs creativity, teaches valuable skills, and connects far-flung people and ideas. The Festival seeks to improve the Web with new ideas and creations.
http://bit.ly/1WmxRQ0

OpenCon
----------------------------------------
November 12-14, 2016
Washington, DC
At this event, the next generation can learn about Open Access, Open Education, and Open Data, develop critical skills, and catalyse action toward a more open system of research and education. OpenCon will convene students and early career academic professionals, both in person and through satellite events around the world and serve as a powerful catalyst for projects led by the next generation to advance OpenCon's three focus areas.
http://bit.ly/1OocSMD

Internet Governance Forum
----------------------------------------
December 6-9, 2016 (TBC)
Guadalajara, Mexico
With the UN's renewal in December 2015, the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) consolidates itself as a platform to bring people together from various stakeholder groups as equals, in discussions on public policy issues relating to the Internet. While there is no negotiated outcome, the IGF informs and inspires those with policy-making power in both the public and private sectors. At their annual meeting delegates discuss, exchange information and share good practices with each other.
http://bit.ly/28YwZPX

Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection
----------------------------------------
January 25-27, 2017
Brussels
The tenth CPDP's main theme is artificial intelligence. The conference is accepting proposals for panels in April (from academic consortia, research projects, think tanks, and other research organisations) and May (from individuals wishing to present academic research papers).
http://bit.ly/1OrQSv6

Rightscon 2017
----------------------------------------
March 29-31, 2017
Brussels, Belgium
RightsCon will tackle the most pressing issues at the intersection of technology and human rights.
http://bit.ly/I2ZAUZ


***

Hear more from the Information Program!
================================
If you want to hear more from the Information Program team each week, consider subscribing to our shared bookmarks on delicious using this RSS feed:
http://feeds.pinboard.in/rss/secret:95194ab804ccccac713b/u:osi_info_program/

You can also read more about our work on the Open Society Foundations website: http://www.opensocietyfoundations.org/about/programs/information-program

Hear less from the Information Program!
================================
If you wish to unsubscribe from this weekly digest, please send an email with the subject line "Unsubscribe" to info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

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Additionally, it uses the bit.ly URL shortening service, which operates under the following privacy policy: http://bit.ly/pages/privacy/

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/

Open Society Foundation, part of the Open Society Foundations, is a company limited by guarantee registered in England and Wales (company number 4571628) and a registered charity (charity number 1105069). Its registered office address is 7th Floor, Millbank Tower, 21-24 Millbank, London SW1P 4QP


News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week ending 10 June 2016
====================================================

The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF. Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

Our staff, advisers and major grantees tweet at http://bit.ly/13j5fjq. Current and former grantees featured in this issue: EDRi, EFF, Privacy International, Quadrature du Net, SPARC Europe.


NEWS
=====
For breaking news stories, visit: http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:news/

UK: Investigatory Powers bill passes House of Commons
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Bloomberg reports that on June 8 the UK's House of Commons voted 444 to 69 to adopt the Investigatory Powers bill. The version that passed will require companies to remove encryption only if they themselves have installed it and if doing so is technically feasible and not unduly expensive. Liberty's former Executive Director Shami Chakrabarti called the changes since the draft bill was first published "minor botox". In a press statement, Privacy International expressed disappointment that the only concession won by the opposition Labour party was an independent review of the operational case for the bulk powers the bill provides. The bill now passes to the House of Lords for consideration and be submitted for review by a panel of legal experts chaired by David Anderson, QC, the UK's independent reviewer of terrorism legislation.
Bloomberg: http://bloom.bg/218z7Ym
PI: http://bit.ly/1PhVvIG

EU: In the run-up to copyright reform, visually impaired still left out
----------------------------------------------------------------------
European Digital Rights' "copyfail" series highlights nine copyright injustices as the EU prepares to review its copyright legislation. Number two on the list, EDRi particularly calls out the EU for failing to ratify the Marrakesh Treaty, intended to facilitate access for the visually impaired. The rest of the list includes a chaotic reuse regime, private enforcement, inadequate remuneration for authors, geoblocking, and restrictions on lending and borrowing. At Open Media, Ruth Coustick-Deal reports that laws under consideration could open the way to a "link tax".
EDRi (Treaty): http://bit.ly/1UBlbRH
EDRi (copyfails): http://bit.ly/22QRClH
Open Media: http://bit.ly/1Yf7TAv

Facial recognition will soon end anonymity in public
----------------------------------------------------------------------
At the Singularity Hub, Tarun Wadhwa reports on a Russian app called FindFace that demonstrates the reality we will all soon face: that advances in facial recognition will soon mean that anonymity in public places has become obsolete. More accurate recognition algorithms, social media's massive databases of identified faces, and the processing capabilities of the devices everyone carries will mean that the images captured by the world's 250 million video surveillance cameras will be easily identifiable. FedBizOps notes that on July 12 the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) will host a one-day conference on deep intermodal video analysis to scope out research questions and address questions from potential proposers.
Singularity Hub: http://bit.ly/1OdMmpx
FBO: http://1.usa.gov/1Ya7EWY

UK: Security agencies bend rules despite oversight
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Ian Thompson reports at The Register that letters exchanged between GCHQ and its official overseer in 2004, obtained by Privacy International, show that the agency was willing to bend the rules. Oversight, assigned to Sir Swinton Thomas, then the Interception Commissioner, failed because Thomas neither knew nor followed the rules he was charged with enforcing. Years after the passage of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act (2000), the services went on using the 1984 Telecommunications Act to command access to citizens' private data.
Register: http://bit.ly/1PhVSTp

EU: LIBE committee to vote on draft terrorism directive on June 15
----------------------------------------------------------------------
La Quadrature du Net reports that the European Parliament Committee on Civil Liberties (LIBE) will vote on June 15 on the draft directive on terrorism, which contains many policies that Quadrature has been fighting against in France for the last two years: censorship of the web, attacks on encryption and the right to privacy, mass electronic surveillance, and lack of safeguards for civil liberties. Quadrature goes on to analyse the likely stance of LIBE committee members.
Quadrature: http://bit.ly/1TZWWCT

EU: Leaders call for open access to all scientific papers by 2020
----------------------------------------------------------------------
SPARC Europe reports that European ministers have united on making immediate access to scientific publications the default by 2020. Among the EU's goals: remove unnecessary legal, organisational, and financial barriers that prevent access to publicly funded results; cooperate with non-EU countries; and ensure that researchers and their employers retain copyright to their work.
SPARC Europe (PDF): http://bit.ly/25MH9wB


FEATURES AND ANALYSIS
====================
For more features and analysis selected by the Program team, visit:
http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:oped/

Tech Giants and Civic Power
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting at the LSE Media Project, Kings College London senior researcher Martin Moore announces his new study "Tech Giants and Civic Power", suggesting that today's technology giants are increasingly taking on civic roles, raising questions about their societal responsibilities - responsibilities beyond those to their customers or shareholders. At the New York Times, Farhad Manjoo discusses the rise of the "Frightful Five", i.e. Apple, Amazon, Facebook, Microsoft and Alphabet, Google's parent, which have created a set of inescapable tech platforms that govern much of the business world. The coming years will see many more countries joining "the coming global freak-out", which, Manjoo argues, will lead to fragmentation as nation-states fight back to preserve their hegemony.
LSE: http://bit.ly/1sws2Wu
New York Times: http://nyti.ms/1Zz3J4L

Helping funders find trustworthy technical advice
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this Inside Philanthropy article, mySociety founder Tom Steinberg discusses how funders can identify trustworthy technical advice. Well-meaning incompetence is a bigger problem than fraud, a problem he illustrates with Hillary Clinton's email server. To solve this problem, he recommends seeking advice from NGOs that are widely known to be tech-savvy as well as staff at high-tech funders, and asking potential recipients about their experience creating technology products. Also, ask via social media who to trust, and pay experts to help write job ads and conduct interviews.
http://bit.ly/1WFsMVH

Reinventing the web
----------------------------------------------------------------------
At the New York Times, Quentin Hardy reports on the Decentralized Web Summit, where internet pioneers such as Tim Berners-Lee, Brewster Kahle, and Vint Cerf gathered to brainstorm reinventing the web to resist censorship, surveillance, and control through payment chokepoints. The project is in the early stages.
NY Times: http://nyti.ms/1UggfpL

China: Internet censorship works
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article at the Washington Post, Simon Denyer highlights the scariest part of China's efforts to censor the internet: they work. Even though technical experts and others argued the internet's design ensures that information will inevitably reach those who want it, in January China's internet czar, Lu Wei, said of censorship, "This path is the choice of history." Also contrary to technical predictions, China's e-commerce market does not seem to have suffered; Global Voices highlights public-private censorship partnerships. Denyer cites research from Freedom House showing that one-third of the world's population face heavy internet censorship. The Economist finds that curbs on free speech are growing worldwide via three primary methods: government repression; assassination; and the spreading idea that people have the right not to be offended.
Washington Post: http://wapo.st/1UEYkru
Global Voices: http://bit.ly/1Yf9Nkk
Economist: http://econ.st/24AK8lY

Google's science fiction misfires
----------------------------------------------------------------------
At STAT, Charles Piller discusses Google's most far-out projects and its many misses. The Tricorder project and the glucose-sensing contact lens are just two examples of projects that have so far failed to deliver on the hype surrounding them. Meanwhile, employees have been leaving Verily, the Google arm where these projects have been incubated. Piller asks, does Silicon Valley arrogance inevitably create "vapourware culture"?
STAT: http://bit.ly/1Ya8Iu2

The secret symbol neo-Nazis are using to target Jews online: parentheses
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article at Tech.Mic, Cooper Fleishman and Anthony Smith report that various anti-Semitic groups have begun enclosing Jewish names in (((triple parentheses))) to highlight them as trollbait. Because search engines typically disregard punctuation, the resulting harassment is difficult to track to its source. Engadget reports that Google has pulled from its store the Coincidence Detector browser extension, intended to automatically apply such highlights to pages displayed in Chrome. In the Sunday Review, New York Times reporter Jonathan Weisman recounts his personal experience as a target.
Mic: http://bit.ly/22QUJKk

Historical computing
----------------------------------------------------------------------
At this YouTube channel, the Computer History Archives Project posts promotional and educational videos from decades past. IBM is heavily represented, but also available are videos covering the early PLATO computer-based education systems, UNIVAC, ENIAC, and Remington Rand. The videos suggest that computers have changed far less than the society around them.
YouTube: http://bit.ly/1Xb0TVC


***

DIARY
==============
To see more events recommended by the Information Program team, visit:
https://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:events/. If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

Workshop on the Economics of Information Security
----------------------------------------
June 13-14, 2016
Berkeley, CA
The Workshop on the Economics of Information Security (WEIS) is the leading forum for interdisciplinary scholarship on information security and privacy, combining expertise from the fields of economics, social science, business, law, policy, and computer science.
http://bit.ly/1RgmF6w

OR2016 Conference
----------------------------------------
June 13-16, 2016
Dublin, NL
The theme of OR2016 is "Illuminating the World." OR2016 will provide an opportunity to explore the impact of repositories and related infrastructure and processes.
http://bit.ly/1pcUNp4

Privatising the rule of law
----------------------------------------
June 16, 2016
Brussels, Belgium
This afternoon event, organised by MEP Marietje Schaake in conjunction with EDRi, will discuss private online law enforcement and liability in the areas of hate speech and copyright. Speakers are drawn from academic, government, civil society, and industry. Space is limited.
http://bit.ly/24AJQLV

BEUC Digiforum
----------------------------------------
June 20, 2016
Brussels, Belgium
"Consumers shaping the digital economy" is the topic of this Digiforum, which aims to identify what is needed for consumers to drive the digital market place.
http://bit.ly/1U7XSSw

SOUPS
----------------------------------------
June 22-24, 2016
Denver, Colorado
The 12th Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security will bring together an interdisciplinary group of researchers and practitioners in human computer interaction, security, and privacy. The program will feature technical papers, workshops and tutorials, a poster session, panels and invited talks, and lightning talks.
http://bit.ly/1Tn7bwy

VOX-Pol Mid-Project conference
----------------------------------------
June 22-24, 2016
Dublin, Ireland
The VOX-Pol Network of Excellence is an EU-funded academic research network focused on researching the prevalence, contours, functions, and impacts of violent online political extremism and responses to it. The conference will feature sessions describing and discussing in-depth and cutting-edge research on violent political extremism and terrorism and the Internet.
http://bit.ly/1U9kfnn

Wikimania
----------------------------------------
June 24-26
Esino Lario, Italy
Wikimania is the annual conference celebrating Wikipedia and its sibling free knowledge projects with conferences, discussions, meetups, training, and a hackathon. Hundreds of volunteer editors come together to learn about and discuss projects, approaches and issues.
http://bit.ly/24m1rci

Jisc and CNI Conference 2016
----------------------------------------
July 6, 2016
Oxford, UK
This year's Joint Information Systems Committee and Coalition for Networked Information conference will bring together leading experts from the US, UK, and Europe to explore the current issues and innovations in digital scholarship and facilitate a rich international exchange on leading practice and policy.
http://bit.ly/238UBnS

21st-Century Literacies for Public Libraries
----------------------------------------
August 10-11, 2016
Philadelphia, PA
At this two-day satellite meeting, presented by IFLA's Public Libraries Section, delegates will share and learn from each other's experiences in developing and delivering services that encompass today's expanded concept of literacy, which includes not only the traditional ability to read and write but proficiency in a range of other literacies such as civic, health, financial, digital, and information.
http://bit.ly/1PZhExo

IFLA World Library and Information Congress
---------------------#-------------------
August 13-19, 2016
Columbus, OH
The theme of the 82nd IFLA Congress is "Connections. Collaboration. Community." The Congress will feature programmes from myriad library sectors.
http://2016.ifla.org/

Privacy+Security Forum
----------------------------------------
October 24-26, 2016
Washington, DC
Monday, October 24, is devoted to pre-conference workshops and "intensive days" - advanced discussion focused narrowly on a particular topic or industry. Proposals are welcome until April 30, 2016 based on the following guiding principles: bridge the silos between privacy and security; cover issues with depth and rigour; employ interaction, scenario-based learning, and extensive engagement; deliver practical takeaways from each session.
http://bit.ly/1RIzYhV

Mozilla Festival
----------------------------------------
November 6-8, 2016
London, UK
MozFest is an annual celebration of the open Web. Participants are diverse, including engineers, artists, activists, and educators, but share the common belief that the Web can make lives better, unlocks opportunity, spurs creativity, teaches valuable skills, and connects far-flung people and ideas. The Festival seeks to improve the Web with new ideas and creations.
http://bit.ly/1WmxRQ0

OpenCon
----------------------------------------
November 12-14, 2016
Washington, DC
At this event, the next generation can learn about Open Access, Open Education, and Open Data, develop critical skills, and catalyse action toward a more open system of research and education. OpenCon will convene students and early career academic professionals, both in person and through satellite events around the world and serve as a powerful catalyst for projects led by the next generation to advance OpenCon's three focus areas.
http://bit.ly/1OocSMD

Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection
----------------------------------------
January 25-27, 2017
Brussels
The tenth CPDP's main theme is artificial intelligence. The conference is accepting proposals for panels in April (from academic consortia, research projects, think tanks, and other research organisations) and May (from individuals wishing to present academic research papers).
http://bit.ly/1OrQSv6

***

Hear more from the Information Program!
================================
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You can also read more about our work on the Open Society Foundations website: http://www.opensocietyfoundations.org/about/programs/information-program

Hear less from the Information Program!
================================
If you wish to unsubscribe from this weekly digest, please send an email with the subject line "Unsubscribe" to info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

This digest operates under the OSF privacy policy: http://www.opensocietyfoundations.org/about/policies/privacy

Additionally, it uses the bit.ly URL shortening service, which operates under the following privacy policy: http://bit.ly/pages/privacy/

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/

Open Society Foundation, part of the Open Society Foundations, is a company limited by guarantee registered in England and Wales (company number 4571628) and a registered charity (charity number 1105069). Its registered office address is 7th Floor, Millbank Tower, 21-24 Millbank, London SW1P 4QP





News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week ending 27 May 2016
====================================================

The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF. Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

Our staff, advisers and major grantees tweet at http://bit.ly/13j5fjq.


NEWS
=====
For breaking news stories, visit: http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:news/

Google appeals French "right to be forgotten" ruling
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The Guardian reports that Google has appealed to the Conseil d'Etat against a French court ruling requiring the company to remove results requested for delisting under the right to be forgotten from all its sites worldwide and for all users, not just from searches conducted from the EU. In an op-ed for France's Le Monde newspaper, Google global general counsel Kent Walker announced the company will appeal the ruling. Walker argues that French jurisdiction should not extend to requiring the removal of content from other national sites that is legal in those other countries. To do so, he says, would create the conditions for a "global race to the bottom, harming access to information that is perfectly lawful to view in one's own country."
Guardian: http://bit.ly/1WWPOIk
Google: http://bit.ly/1RtLA26

US: John Crane exposes the lives of Whistleblowers
----------------------------------------------------------------------
A Guardian excerpt from Mark Hertsgaard's new book Bravehearts: Whistle Blowing in the Age of Snowden, reports the story of John Crane, a former senior official in the US Department of Defense. For years, Crane fought his superiors to provide fair treatment for pre-Snowden whistleblowers such as Thomas Drake and William Binney. Despite the provisions of the Whistleblower Act, Crane was stopped from providing necessary documents in time for Drake's trial; instead, he now recounts, his superiors lied to the judge that the documents had been destroyed prior to the indictment. Forced out in 2013, Crane filed a complaint with the Government Accountability Project over the above and many other misdeeds; the Justice Department is investigating.
Guardian: http://bit.ly/1U9kqPL

Twitter blocks law enforcement access to data mining service
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The ACLU reports, based on a (paywalled) Wall Street Journal article, that Twitter is to stop allowing US federal intelligence to access its affiliated Dataminr service, which compiles and analyses the hundreds of millions of tweets users post daily. ACLU argues that Twitter should extend the ban to local law enforcement, which similarly is buying surveillance tools that exploit Twitter user data, and goes on to advocate greater transparency about the many other such services on the market, such as Media Sonar and Geofeedia.
ACLU: http://bit.ly/1TCtSvM

Mozambique: $140 million Chinese system enables government surveillance
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Global Voices reports on the independent media outlet @Verdade's investigation of surveillance in Mozambique, where the government has been secretly listening to phone calls, reading emails and other text messages, and monitoring social media and web activity using a system reportedly built by the Chinese company ZTE Corporation. Built during the latter years of Armando Guebuza's 2005-2015 presidency, the scheme costs the Mozambique government US$140 million in a deal mediated by Guebuza's son's company, Msumbiji Investment Limited. Interceptions are managed by the military command, and neither judicial authorisation nor telecommunications company cooperation is needed.
Global Voices: http://bit.ly/1WPHDNb

US: Oracle v. Google to determine the future of software
----------------------------------------------------------------------
As the six-year-old copyright dispute between Google and Oracle over 37 Java APIs (application programming interfaces; that is, technical specifications that allow third parties to write programs using others' services or software) winds to a close, Wired explains why the case is crucially important for the future of software and what Google's loss could mean to start-ups and established developers alike. In prior hearings, Google won a ruling that APIs were not subject to copyright, but it was overturned on appeal and the Supreme Court declined to hear the case. The District Court will now decide whether Google's usage constitutes "fair use". As Sarah Jeong recounts at Motherboard, one of the most difficult aspects of the case has been explaining what APIs are to the non-expert judge and jury. Oracle is asking for $9.3 billion in damages.
Wired: http://bit.ly/1Vk6xU7
Motherboard: http://bit.ly/1qLOIRd

Elsevier acquires SSRN
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Nature reports that Elsevier has acquired the highly popular Social Science Research Network, an open-access research preprint repository, for an undisclosed sum. Elsevier says it intends to keep SSRN's leadership and user policies unchanged. The oldest and largest preprint server, arXiv, is funded by a host of institutions and operated by Cornell University; co-founder Paul Ginsparg told Nature there are no plans for it to change ownership.
Nature: http://bit.ly/1Z38gfF

Norway: Consumer council exposes app terms and conditions
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In February, the Norwegian Consumer Council published the results of a survey of mobile apps, which detailed the ways that their terms and conditions are opaque and privacy-invasive. The NCC went on to file a complaint against FitnessKeeper after finding that its Runkeeper app was leaking location information to an unknown third-party advertising company. Ars Technica reports that in response Runkeeper has fixed the bug that caused this issue. On May 24, the NCC staged a live-streamed full reading of all the T&Cs that apply to an average smartphone to demonstrate the burden on consumers. Deutsche Welle reports that reading the full text, longer than Moby Dick, took nearly 32 hours.
NCC (study): http://bit.ly/25o2oVq
Ars Technica: http://bit.ly/1qLP8H3
NCC (reading): http://www.forbrukerradet.no/terms-and-conditions-word-by-word
Deutsche Welle: http://bit.ly/1WWRj9l

UK: Pressure mounts for a "digital bill of rights"
----------------------------------------------------------------------
CDT reports that the UK think tank Cybersalon has launched a cross-party campaign, backed by a range of civil liberties groups, for a "digital bill of rights". The launch follows a series of efforts by Cybersalon to raise issues of technology and policy via live events. Further events and a process of collecting public opinions are planned before the bill is drafted. In response to Prime Minister David Cameron's call to leave the European Convention on Human Rights, the Guardian published a spoof video in which Patrick Stewart asks what the ECHR has ever done for the UK.
CDT: http://bit.ly/1Z38Jyc
Digital Liberties: http://bit.ly/1XzMGjY
Guardian: http://bit.ly/249ucHf


FEATURES AND ANALYSIS
====================
For more features and analysis selected by the Program team, visit:
http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:oped/

The magic of technology
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this Medium article former magician and Google design ethicist Tristan Harris discusses the psychological and design tricks technology companies use to manipulate customers and keep them hooked on their apps and services.
Medium: http://bit.ly/20GPhrL

Sessions from RightsCon
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Among this selection of recorded videos from April's RightsCon are discussions of surveillance in Brazil, and the chilling effect of government programmes, largely targeting Muslims, aiming to counter extremism, particularly in schools (in one case, a child's comment on a school document led to her previously blameless physician father's investigation and arrest for insurance fraud). Particularly interesting is the discussion of surveillance, race, and movement building, which features an intelligent dissection of race, class, and power by Malkia Cyril, who notes that communities of colour have long been watched in everything they do for purposes of control (starting at about 4:00).
RightsCon: http://bit.ly/1TLGaFs

The rise of the mitigators
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting at Civicist, mySociety founder Tom Steinberg divides internet-related organisations into two camps, "promoters" (technology companies, including non-profits such as Wikipedia and Mozilla) and "mitigators" (primarily non-profits such as EFF, Data & Society, the Chaos Computer Club, and Open Rights Group). While both groups have bloomed over the last two decades, Steinberg believes we are entering a period where mitigators will grow substantially and promoters will stall. While Steinberg is unsure what to think - in part, his posting is a request for thoughts - he is sad about the fading of the excitement over "public-interest technologies of real scale".
Civicist: http://bit.ly/1sAPJNa

The false promise of DNA testing
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this Atlantic article, Matthew Shaer explores the flaws in DNA evidence created by changes in how forensic science is used, particularly focusing on the Houston forenscis lab, which was implicated in a number of false convictions. The increasing sensitivity of DNA testing has raised the probability of contamination through traces that formerly were too small for testing. Some US states have created conflicts of interest by paying forensic labs for successful convictions. Probabilistic genetic typing software may help solve the first problem; changing incentives and firewalling forensic labs from state prosecutors may help the second.
Atlantic: http://theatln.tc/1TYOVYI

The social licence of publishing
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this year's Charles Clark Memorial Lecture (transcribed), University of Sydney professor Michael Fraser warns publishers that they are losing their social licence with the public. Publishers, he says, should re-engineer their business models both to provide better access to their works and better protect authors and should embrace their role as "defenders of freedom".
PLS: http://bit.ly/1Vk6PKA

The benefits of VR
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting, the science fiction writer Charles Stross discusses his recent experiments with the HTC Vive virtual reality headset, which he finds to be shockingly good. Given the many scare stories about VR that lurk just around the corner (Stross links to some samples), Stross decided to highlight three unexpected benefits he thinks high-quality VR will bring: improved physical fitness, improved eyesight, and better treatments for mental illness.
Stross: http://bit.ly/1TDArDm

***

DIARY
==============
To see more events recommended by the Information Program team, visit:
https://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:events/. If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

Transparency Camp Europe
----------------------------------------
June 1, 2016
Amsterdam, Netherlands
This unconference will focus on open data, new technologies, and policies that make the EU work for people, stimulate open government, and help grasp the workings of the various EU institutions. The event will include an online app competition.
http://bit.ly/1WuJ445

Health Privacy Summit
----------------------------------------
June 6-7
Washington, DC
The 2016 Health Privacy Summit brings together top national and international experts for serious discussion about global health privacy issues and realistic solutions and to ask, Is Big Data effectively the beginning of the end for privacy in health care?
http://bit.ly/1Qw5AkN

20th International Conference on Electronic Publishing
----------------------------------------
June 7-9, 2016
Göttingen, Germany
ELPUB 2016 will take a fresh look at the current ecosystem of scholarly publishing including the positioning of stakeholders and distribution of economic, technological and discursive power. ELPUB will also open the floor for emerging alternatives in how scholars and citizens interact with scholarly content and what role dissemination and publishing plays in these interactions. Questions to be raised include: What is the core of publishing today? How does agenda setting in emerging frameworks like Open Science function and what is the nature of power of the referring scholarly discourses? How does this relate to the European and world-wide Open Science and Open Innovation agenda of funders and institutions, and how does this look like in publishing practice?
http://bit.ly/1qXdIFo

Personal Democracy Forum
----------------------------------------
June 9-10
New York, NY
The 2016 Personal Democracy Forum will feature speakers such as Danah Boyd, Kate Crawford, Douglas Rushkoff, and Anil Dash.
http://bit.ly/1ExPHDH

Workshop on the Economics of Information Security
----------------------------------------
June 13-14, 2016
Berkeley, CA
The Workshop on the Economics of Information Security (WEIS) is the leading forum for interdisciplinary scholarship on information security and privacy, combining expertise from the fields of economics, social science, business, law, policy, and computer science.
http://bit.ly/1RgmF6w

OR2016 Conference
----------------------------------------
June 13-16, 2016
Dublin, NL
The theme of OR2016 is "Illuminating the World." OR2016 will provide an opportunity to explore the impact of repositories and related infrastructure and processes.
http://bit.ly/1pcUNp4

SOUPS
----------------------------------------
June 22-24
Denver, Colorado
The 12th Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security will bring together an interdisciplinary group of researchers and practitioners in human computer interaction, security, and privacy. The program will feature technical papers, workshops and tutorials, a poster session, panels and invited talks, and lightning talks.
http://bit.ly/1Tn7bwy

VOX-Pol Mid-Project conference
----------------------------------------
June 22-24, 2016
Dublin, Ireland
The VOX-Pol Network of Excellence is an EU-funded academic research network focused on researching the prevalence, contours, functions, and impacts of violent online political extremism and responses to it. The conference will feature sessions describing and discussing in-depth and cutting-edge research on violent political extremism and terrorism and the Internet.
http://bit.ly/1U9kfnn

Wikimania
----------------------------------------
June 24-26
Esino Lario, Italy
Wikimania is the annual conference celebrating Wikipedia and its sibling free knowledge projects with conferences, discussions, meetups, training, and a hackathon. Hundreds of volunteer editors come together to learn about and discuss projects, approaches and issues.
http://bit.ly/24m1rci

Jisc and CNI Conference 2016
----------------------------------------
July 6, 2016
Oxford, UK
This year's Joint Information Systems Committee and Coalition for Networked Information conference will bring together leading experts from the US, UK, and Europe to explore the current issues and innovations in digital scholarship and facilitate a rich international exchange on leading practice and policy.
http://bit.ly/238UBnS

21st-Century Literacies for Public Libraries
----------------------------------------
August 10-11, 2016
Philadelphia, PA
At this two-day satellite meeting, presented by IFLA's Public Libraries Section, delegates will share and learn from each other's experiences in developing and delivering services that encompass today's expanded concept of literacy, which includes not only the traditional ability to read and write but proficiency in a range of other literacies such as civic, health, financial, digital, and information.
http://bit.ly/1PZhExo

IFLA World Library and Information Congress
----------------------------------------
August 13-19, 2016
Columbus, OH
The theme of the 82nd IFLA Congress is "Connections. Collaboration. Community." The Congress will feature programmes from myriad library sectors.
http://2016.ifla.org/

Privacy+Security Forum
----------------------------------------
October 24-26, 2016
Washington, DC
Monday, October 24, is devoted to pre-conference workshops and "intensive days" - advanced discussion focused narrowly on a particular topic or industry. Proposals are welcome until April 30, 2016 based on the following guiding principles: bridge the silos between privacy and security; cover issues with depth and rigour; employ interaction, scenario-based learning, and extensive engagement; deliver practical takeaways from each session.
http://bit.ly/1RIzYhV

Mozilla Festival
----------------------------------------
November 6-8, 2016
London, UK
MozFest is an annual celebration of the open Web. Participants are diverse, including engineers, artists, activists, and educators, but share the common belief that the Web can make lives better, unlocks opportunity, spurs creativity, teaches valuable skills, and connects far-flung people and ideas. The Festival seeks to improve the Web with new ideas and creations.
http://bit.ly/1WmxRQ0

OpenCon
----------------------------------------
November 12-14, 2016
Washington, DC
At this event, the next generation can learn about Open Access, Open Education, and Open Data, develop critical skills, and catalyse action toward a more open system of research and education. OpenCon will convene students and early career academic professionals, both in person and through satellite events around the world and serve as a powerful catalyst for projects led by the next generation to advance OpenCon's three focus areas.
http://bit.ly/1OocSMD

Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection
----------------------------------------
January 25-27, 2017
Brussels
The tenth CPDP's main theme is artificial intelligence. The conference is accepting proposals for panels in April (from academic consortia, research projects, think tanks, and other research organisations) and May (from individuals wishing to present academic research papers).
http://bit.ly/1OrQSv6

***

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Previously in wg's TV adventures...Marc Wootton, presenting himself as "Shirley Ghostman".


A guy named Jonathan Levene (@jjlevene on Twitter) called me and asked if I'd do an interview with some guy for a pilot for a TV series getting people to talk about religious beliefs and science. I said sure. They didn't really tell me much - said it would be an interview/discussion and that it was as much a screen test for the interviewer as...I don't know what.


He said they're hoping to sell the show to HBO, but the company's website says it's developing a show for PBS. Since the website consists of a single page, I presume it's only there to show prospective participants *something*. The show as described to me *might* sell to PBS - I can see it running a religious/science discussion show; it didn't and doesn't seem like HBO's kind of thing - though an "edgy" British comedy show might be.


On arrival at Grange Park (we were filming at Denmark Studios in Enfield), Jonathan met me and asked me to wait with a cup of tea in the local cafe while he went to make sure they were ready. The studio was very small and cramped, he said. On arrival there, though, I noticed a large, empty couch...


In the cafe, Jonathan explained I would be discussing science and religion with someone he called (I think) "Dr Dave". He had me sign a one-page contract/release, which I read. I remember the jurisdiction was New York (which is the address All of the Above Media gives on its one-page website), but Jonathan didn't offer, and I didn't think to ask for, a copy. In future, my rule will be never to sign releases until recording has completed.


The studio itself was (weirdly?) empty of people except for Jonathan, who brought me in, someone who asked if I'd turned off my mobile phone, a tech who clipped on a radio mic, checked levels, adjusted the mic, and then vanished, the three cameramen, and then the guy himself, who said barely anything when he arrived bearing a clipboard with what appeared to be two pages filled with lines of small type, which he kept in his lap behind the desk and frequently consulted. The fact that there was a monitor behind us with "YOU DECIDE" displayed on it, gold on royal blue, with a Christian cross between the two words hinted that either HBO was going into religious broadcasting (*so* unlikely), the producers were delusional (a possibility I seriously considered), or I'd been set up in some unknown way for some kind of comedy skit....because you really could imagine that backdrop for an SNL segment or something. I had been told we'd be filming in front of a green screen, and indeed the backdrop and side drops were all featureless bright green - which means, of course, that there will be some kind of projected background. That could be *anything*.


"Dr Dave" (assuming I've remembered the name I was given correctly) was *very* far removed from not only my sense of reality but anyone else's, which meant he was either in need of medical treatment or attempting a send-up, like Shirley.


All the above little points which I didn't fully note consciously at the time, are my best attempt at explaining why the possibility of a set-up never left my mind all day. Even in the cafe I found myself telling Jonathan the Shirley Ghostman story, and that makes me think I already sensed something off, but I don't know what.


The following is what I remember of the ensuing conversation, though they may not be in the order in which they occurred and are not a complete account (we talked for nearly two very long hours...); they're what I can remember. I'm posting this as a contemporaneous record just in case of...I'm not sure what.


The director (I guess) said we were recording as live, counted down from five, and we were off. He immediately vanished, leaving the set with Dave, me, and the three mute cameraman.


- His mostly bald head kind of bulged toward the back, which made me wonder if it was makeup/prosthetic/a bald cap. He had been thoroughly powdered to avoid shine, and I thought it was interesting no one had suggested doing the same to me, since they often do. I was wearing no makeup at all (since I never do).


- He began by introducing the segment so diffidently and hesitantly that I thought they'd ask him to stop and restart, and when they didn't, I thought OK, they said it was a screen test for him, but if that's true this guy is already obviously too incompetent to use, so why are they continuing?


- I was unsure about his accent; it seemed to me American but I thought I heard some non-native fuzziness around the edges, which could be the result of living in England for a long time or a British person putting on an American accent. Or...not.


- He said he was a cardiologist and also had a PhD in history, so the "Dr" was earned (twice). What were my qualifications? "I'm a dilettante," I said cheerfully. He demanded that I explain this word. (A guy with two degrees, including one in history, who doesn't know "dilettante"? Sure...or maybe he thinks the audience won't understand it). I said, "It means I'm an amateur."


- We briefly discussed my founding of The Skeptic and why I did it, and explained that "skepticism is inquiry" and that skeptics ask for evidence and that we don't tackle matters of faith.


- He asked about my religious beliefs, and I said I had grown up without any. Well, what did I call myself? I said I usually said I was an "agnostic". He asked what that meant and how it was different from other terms. I said, Well, to me an atheist is someone who denies the existence of God and an agnostic is someone to whom it's not important.


- He started talking about God, "He", "His"... For some reason I tried a joke: "Surely, She's black". Huh? What was that about? I explained the old 1970s joke where someone says he's been to Heaven and the person he's talking to says, "Did you meet God? What's He like?" "Well, first of all, She's black..." He seemed confused by this explanation.


- At some point, maybe 20-30 minutes in (I think; I'd forgotten my watch, which was a pity), it was bizarre enough and had gone on long enough that I turned to the room at large and said, "What are we really doing here?" The cameramen remained silent, like one of those scenes in a Gothic novel where the heroine, discovering that her host is a monster, finds herself alone except for servants whose mouths, eyes, and ears have been sewn shut.


- He began talking about creation "science". Did I believe in it. I said the scientific evidence provided pretty strong support for evolution. He seemed to feel it was just obvious that everything must have been designed. "Who designed the designer?" I asked. Apparently the designer just *was*. "Oh,", I said, "So it's turtles all the way down?" I had to explain this joke to him. He then said that the big bang theory didn't really explain where the universe came from, either - what was before the explosion? Well, he had me there.


- At some point I explained that as a skeptic I'm prepared to simply say that I don't know the explanation for things rather than pick on something easy just to have an explanation. Later, he used this to characterize me/skeptics as ignorant and offer viewers the choice promised on the monitor (You Decide) - presumably between our ignorance and his knowledge.


- He kept citing some science institute in Kansas whose name I don't fully remember and can't look up because it was utterly bland as the source of various "scientific" claims. In fact, all the names connected with this operation are too non-distinctive for successful online searches, which seems like a useful design if you're trying to play people. I did note that he stressed the Kansas the three or four times he mentioned it, which made me wonder if he was trying to get me to comment on that (I didn't), but he didn't generally leave space if I'd wanted to. I feel bad for Kansans; most of them don't deserve to be the butt of random people's potshots.


- A couple of times at the beginning I giggled. Why was I laughing, he asked. Since I can't now remember what I found funny, I can't explain it now either. Most of the experience was pretty tedious.


- He repeatedly accused me of flirting with and/or being attracted to him (as IF).


- At some point - I can't remember why now - I mentioned being 10 in 1964. "I'd have thought it was earlier," he said. I went on with whatever I was saying and thought it was lucky I don't have that particular insecurity. (It was, too, because see below. Before you ask, my Twitter picture is from 2008. I need a new one)


- Several times he made comments indicating I look older than my actual age (62); he asked me to guess his (because he lives on this super-healthy Adam and Eve diet, see, about which he said he wrote a book (which - there is such a book, but he's not the author) ) and after trying to get out of it because I'm crap at guessing ages I decided to make sure I'd hit an age high enough to fend off any claim he might make of unexpected youthfulness and said, "72". He said he was indeed 72 and then kept saying how much younger he looked (not if I guessed right, surely?) than not only *his* age, but *me* and that he wouldn't have believed I was ten years younger. I told him I wasn't lying, and that my age is correctly displayed on my Wikipedia page, which he replied (granted, correctly) that I could have edited (but I didn't!). He embedded several comments about my looking older in other statements - not leaving space for me to argue. If it was meant to make me mad...meh. I have a little too much ego for that. If he intentionally wanted to look like a jackass, well, I guess he succeeded, if you think saying someone looks older is insulting. Is breaking that taboo funny? It was stupid of me to bother arguing with him about this at all.


- He apologized to his wife, "Jean", on camera several times for my "inappropriate flirting" with him. Almost at the end, after the last such apology, I turned to the camera, and said, "Yes. Jean, I also apologize." He sharply objected: "Don't talk to my wife" and then quickly muttered, "She's been through enough." No, I did not say, "Well, married to you, I'm not surprised."


- He used first his hand ("Guess how many hand surgeons there are at the Mayo Clinic." "I don't know." "Seven." Because the hand is the most complicated part of the human body...) and then a banana he had ready to explain why there had to be a divine designer. The banana, he said, is perfect ("it's non-slip..."; it's color-coded to show when it's unripe (green), ready to eat (yellow), and dangerous (black - although actually black doesn't mean they're dangerous, just that they're overripe, and ick), and challenged me to explain how evolution could possibly have produced it. He partially peeled it ("the top snaps like a Coke can", another part of its perfect packaging) and suggestively slid the unsheathed portion into his mouth several times to show how perfectly it "fits into a MAN's mouth". I longed to joke about this, but said nothing. The banana led to his saying that this is what Adam and Eve ate - fruit, and he mentioned some fruits and the bit about having written the book, and I asked about apples. Well, no, they're not on the list. They only ate *one* apple, and that caused the Fall. This led directly to...


- ...He "cried" about his past as a "chronic masturbator", which he was able to end by stopping eating apples, which are, of course, the fruit of sin. I noticed no moisture around the eyes or nose. This led to...


- The society-wide level of masturbation before the flood hit 99% and the *next day* God issued his instructions to Noah. He's basing this on, apparently, semen found in clay pots in Jerusalem. I said, "Well, they probably didn't have socks," a joke that he asked me to *explain*. I sort of tried; I wasn't embarrassed, if that's what he hoped. (Come on, I wanted to say, We've all seen Friends. Chandler's sock was a whole plot.) And...


- Masturbation level is now nearly 8% (which I queried on the basis that it was insanely low). For men, since there are no statistics for women (I guess we don't spill seed), and that if everyone stopped climate change would reverse. He had a colored world map for each set of statistics ready and cued-up (another indicator of a set-up, I think - what genuine program would have put this guy on once they'd seen them?). "Have you ever met a masturbator?" he asked. "I've met you," I said reasonably...which led to more of the weeping-in-shame routine.


- He claimed that "Onanism" caused billions of lost souls; I stupidly argued this, pointing out that even in a pregnancy-causing ejaculation millions of sperm were still wasted. "Ah," he said, "but those are not viable. They're retarded, or..." I forget what, but I went on to make the point that therefore he could only reasonably argue that 1 to 10 of the spilled seed were lost souls. I "won" that one.


- He said he had seven kids. I remember feeling sorry for them (if they actually exist).


- At some point, he began passing off the jokes I did make with a line like "I suppose that's humor". I guess he got tired of claiming he didn't understand them and asking me to explain.


- How, he wanted to know, did I explain the picture he'd found online of a duck with tiny human feet? "Was it Photoshopped?" I asked. No, it was verified by that same institute in KANSAS. What did I intuitively think? "I don't know - I haven't seen it or the evidence." Women are supposed to be intuitive: what's your intuition. Ignoring the women are intuitive stupidity: "Probably what I asked first: is it a hoax?" I did look for such a picture when I got home and found one in a joke thread in a Christian forum alongside some other wacky pictures of ducks. It is *obviously* composited; that may be where they got the idea. (It's here: http://www.worthychristianforums.com/topic/189353-derailing-thread/?page=23)


- This led to my using an analogy of Randi's to try to get across "extraordinary claims require extraordinary proof". If you claim you have a horse in your backyard, I might believe you and not bother to check. "Unless I live in New York City." Yes. I had been about to say "Unless your backyard is in Brooklyn." (There is actually a current TV series in which the TWO BROKE GIRLS were supposedly keeping a horse in their Brooklyn backyard at the beginning of season 1; one of the many reasons I watched only one episode - they have no space, and they're *broke*. How are they feeding it and where do they put the droppings?) But, I went on to say, if you tell me you have a unicorn in your backyard - at which point Randi usually talks about getting samples of the horn and checking for glue. He interrupted and said, "That's impossible. Unicorns don't exist." I wish I'd had the wit to suggest they may be living in those unexplored parts of China, but I didn't think of it.


- At some point he talked about how he saw the Lord in everything and asked if I didn't, too. "No." I tried another analogy (yes, I know I should have learned by then), and asked if when he went outdoors on a beautiful day and saw the blue sky and green in the landscape he saw purple. "Yes." "In everything?" "Yes." So much for that idea.


- He talked about how the Lord gives meaning to everything in his life, and that's impossible without God and His guidance/moral code. I said that many of the things I do - and I named as an example serving on the advisory council of the Open Rights Group to help promote civil liberties on the internet - are meaningful to me without worrying about a God. (Now, unlike most of the rest of this discussion, *this* part of the conversation I have had before, with a very conservative Christian I knew when I lived in Ireland; I think every agnostic or atheist has had it at least once. It never leads anywhere because it's extremely hard to convey *why* something gives meaning to your life. But at least it was a short break from the surrealism.)


- It was pretty infuriating that he kept taking things I'd said and misconstruing them and then repeating them. eg, he said something about longevity, and I commented that although the *average* lifespan has been increasing for some decades the *maximum* known lifespan hasn't really budged. Ah, he said but there are some people living in "unexplored parts of China" (where are those? where on this planet is unexplored?) who are 150 years old, and I said, well, the birth records aren't always accurate from that long ago - so he accused me of racism and said his business manager is Chinese and they can keep records perfectly well. (Saying I'd had a Chinese accountant didn't seem to help this.)


- At the end, he asked me to pray with him. I refused, and simply watched him while he said some things, ending with a prayer for the "Reverend Trump". "Reverend?" I asked. "As in revered," he said. I indicated that I thought he'd been implying that Trump was some sort of minister. Apparently not. He also told me he loved everything and everyone, including me - but not in a sexual way because that would be inappropriate because he's married. "No, you don't," I said. "You really don't." (And I believe that's true not only of his "Christian" persona but whatever his real one is.)


Afterwards, Jonathan seemed shocked and asked why I didn't slap him (I don't slap people of any age - I took it as an expression of sympathy, but perhaps he was disappointed), and promised me that either it's not a setup or they set *him* up too. I have since learned that he asked another skeptic he approached to appear on the show what kind of comedy he liked. Ah: he and I also talked about comedy, which at the time I put down to my rambling conversational style. Learning that it was on the list of topics for discussion (whether Jonathan made the list or the producers did), as far as I was concerned, clinched the set-up theory. I also noticed that a) the guy disappeared the instant the cameras went off and they got me out of there and into a waiting car PDQ so I didn't talk to anyone afterwards except Jonathan. I also note that Jonathan told me he'd gotten me a car because it had gone on so long - but the cab driver told me he'd been waiting for two hours, and the time he said they called him was right about when recording started. So in fact, the car was probably to avoid risking having to wait with - and therefore talk to - me for any length of time while we walked to the station and waited for a train. (It was annoying: the car took twice as long as the train would have.)


The thing was that through the whole thing I kept thinking about the Shirley Ghostman experience, and this felt very much like that - bizarre, surreal, inconsistent with my prior experience (in Shirley's case, of psychics; in this case, of Christian fundamentalists), and that actually tempered my reactions. If it was a set-up, I thought anything dramatic would be yay! for them. Also, because it went on so long eventually it was obvious that at most they'd only ever use two chopped-up minutes of it. At the time, I wasn't as sure as I later became that it was a set-up, so my reasoning was: if the guy is meant to be real he's too lunatic and too incompetent to use, so none of this will ever appear, and if it's a set-up I'm not sure what kind, but they've lied to me and I don't need to help them. At some point it went on so long (they'd said recording would take an hour and it went on for two), I just let myself get bored and skipped responding to anything I didn't feel like bothering with.


Of course, I *also* never asked him point-blank if he was a fake, and although I think that's what this type of set-up relies on (that you, the butt of the joke, will try to work with the other person rather than shoot to kill), I also don't think I would have gotten anywhere doing that. One reason I think skeptics are vulnerable to becoming the butts of other people's jokes - aside from the "oh, look at the pointy-eared people with glasses" thing - is that skeptics who do much TV tend tread gently with other people's beliefs. Many are genuinely deeply held; many of the people who hold them have had terrible things happen in their lives. Even the people who are selling something - their capabilities as a medium, for example - require polite treatment because if you aren't what the viewing public will see is a nice, kindly person who just wants to help people, and an elitist smart-ass telling them off. So I will ask what the evidence is or talk generally about cases where the evidence is known and shows an alternative explanation, and Chris French will talk about the psychology of belief, and generally none of us will break on-screen and call people idiots, delusional, or whatever no matter how apparently absurd their statements are because it makes both us personally and skepticism in general look bad. I guess that's what happens when you have meaning in your life.


On the way to the car, when I marveled at the guy's obvious impossibility Jonathan said, "that's why we do these screen tests."


Whatever.


Whois says the alltheabovemedia.com domain is registered via GoDaddy, so I can't get any more information that way. I suppose all will be revealed someday (or not). Anyway, I'm posting this account to have a contemporaneous record. And yes, I don't like being someone else's plaything, and I *really* don't like having the skeptics made to look stupid. If that's their game. Forty-eight hours later, no one has bothered to tell me.


wg


News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week ending 13 May 2016
====================================================

The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF. Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

Our staff, advisers and major grantees tweet at http://bit.ly/13j5fjq. Current and former grantees featured in this issue: EFF, Privacy International.


PROGRAM NEWS
============

NEWS
=====
For breaking news stories, visit: http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:news/

Brazil: State judge shuts down WhatsApp countrywide
----------------------------------------------------------------------
At The Intercept, Glenn Greenwald reports that on April 26 a Brazilian state judge ordered mobile phone operators to block WhatsApp for 72 hours. The app is the most popular messaging app in Brazil, used by 91% of Brazilian mobile users, or 100 million people. EFF adds that #CPICIBER report, which has now been approved by the Parliamentary Commission on Cybercrime, extends the site-blocking provision to foreign sites without representation in Brazil despite provisions in the Marco Civil that enshrine network neutrality and limiting ISPs' liability. 
Intercept: http://bit.ly/224J9e8
EFF: http://bit.ly/224JcGL

US: Supreme Court grants FBI greater hacking powers
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The Guardian reports that the US Supreme Court has ruled that federal judges should be able to issue hacking warrants for any US jurisdiction if the suspect has tried to hide their location. The extension to "Rule 41" is due to go into effect on December 1. However, Senator Ron Wyden, the Intelligence Committee's most senior Democrat, has announced plans to introduce a bill to nullify the court's ruling. In its discussion, EFF notes that the rule change represents not only a vast and dangerous expansion of surveillance powers but also expands the ground covered by the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure from purely procedural matters to changing substantive rights. The power to hack computers in any jurisdiction also appears in the UK's draft Investigatory Powers Bill under the term "bulk equipment interference"; Cambridge professor Ross Anderson analysed the problems with this approach in a written brief he provided in support in support of a case brought last year by Privacy International.
Guardian: http://bit.ly/1NtdnVr
EFF: http://bit.ly/224JzRM
Anderson (PDF): http://bit.ly/224JBcq

China: Baidu under investigation after student's death
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The China Post reports that the Chinese regulator has ruled that leading Chinese search engine Baidu must change the way it displays search results after a student's death was blamed on an experimental cancer treatment he found via the search engine. Reuters, which reported on the investigation, notes that Baidu derives 84% of its revenues from search, and 20-30% of its search revenues from health care. Before he died, student Wei Zexi blamed both Baidu and the military-run hospital where he was treated, which is also under investigation. Baidu has come under fire for advertising clutter that makes it difficult to distinguish paid search results from organic ones. 
Reuters: http://reut.rs/1WuIdR2
China Post: http://bit.ly/24Wgj4S

Netherlands, Belgium: Canada-EU Trade agreement finding opposition
----------------------------------------------------------------------
EurActiv reports that the Dutch and Walloon Parliaments have refused to sign the Canada-EU Trade Agreement, which is due to reach its final negotiation meeting in June. The Foundation for a Free Information Infrastructure has published its analysis of the flaws in the EU-Canada trade agreement, CETA. In a series of postings, FFII argues that CETA will harm the privacy of EU citizens, enact Investor-State Dispute Resolution, and place itself above the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights.
EurActiv: http://bit.ly/1rK95z2
FFII: http://bit.ly/1TSPshx

UK: Land Registry privatisation poses economic risks
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In new research, the Open Data Institute finds that the UK government's plan to privatise the Land Registry threatens anti-corruption efforts and will ultimately cost the UK several billion pounds in foregone tax and VAT revenues. The ODI's research also finds that open data adds 0.5% to GDP when compared to restricted data, which would have amounted to £9 billion for the UK in 2014 - and £232 billion across the world. The ODI is continuing to collect information on how people use Land Registry data for its submission to the consultation on the proposed sale, which ends on May 26.
The ODI: http://bit.ly/1OrQnkO

Google Bans Payday Loan Advertisements 
-----------------------------------------------------------------
The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, which numbers 200 civil society organisations among its members, has welcomed Google's announcement that the company will ban ads for payday lenders. The company is defining these as loans due for repayment within 60 days or, in the US, charging annual rates of over 36%. At SEObook, Aaron Wall provides a more nuanced look at the decision, pointing out a conflict of interest, in that Google Ventures has had a stake in the short-term lender LendUp since 2013, which he suggests will benefit from the reduced presence of its competitors.
Leadership Conference: http://bit.ly/1TC9o5I
SEObook: http://bit.ly/1rK9m58

Greenpeace leaks draft Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership agreement
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Greenpeace Netherlands has leaked the text of about half of the April 2016 draft of the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership treaty. Thirteen of the released chapters show the US position for the first time. While chapters on digital policy issues such as e-commerce and intellectual property were not included in the leak, EDRi provides an analysis of the telecommunications chapter, noting "an ideological drive towards deregulation and law enforcement by private companies". Among the leaked papers, Internet policy expert Monica Horten finds one in which the EU warns the US that last-minute demands for changes to intellectual property provisions mirroring the provisions in the Transpacific Partnership agreement are unlikely to be accepted. She also finds that the telecoms proposals extend the corporate reach noted in other sectors, threatening network neutrality and citizens' rights.
Greenpeace: http://bit.ly/23NCEMa
EDRi: http://bit.ly/1Ntd4Ki
Horten (US demands): http://bit.ly/1Ntde4p
Horten (telecom): http://bit.ly/1Ntde4pt


FEATURES AND ANALYSIS
====================
For more features and analysis selected by the Program team, visit:
http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:oped/

Surveillance capitalism
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this lengthy essay from Frankfurter Allgemeine, Shoshana Zuboff frames today's debates over privacy as the effects of "surveillance capitalism", calling Google "ground zero for a wholly new subspecies of capitalism" that "preys on dependent populations who are neither its consumers nor its employees and are largely ignorant of its procedures". Zuboff warns that the practices pioneered by today's large data-driven companies are "poised to transform commercial practice across the real world too".
Frankfurter Allgemeine: http://bit.ly/1X7p6e6

Dilbert's guide to electronic voting
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this comic strip, Dilbert creator Scott Adams concisely captures what's wrong with electronic voting.
Dilbert: http://bit.ly/1Xp8eQy

Sci-Hub appeals to (almost) everyone
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this analysis at Science of server log data supplied by Sci-Hub creator Alexandra Elbakyan, John Bohannon finds that over the six months leading up to March 2016 28 million researchers worldwide downloaded papers from the pirate website for scholarly literature. The publisher with the most requested articles by far is Elsevier. A quarter of downloads came from OECD member countries; 4.4 million came from China, 3.4 million from India. Bohannon also discusses the varying motives for using Sci-Hub: the quick and convenient interface design may count as much as cost. The titles appearing on the list of most-downloaded papers seem startlingly niche. On May 4, TorrentFreak reported that Elsevier, which used its preliminary injunction to request the seizure of the original sci-hub.org domain, has now succeeded in getting the Chinese registrar for .io to pull that Sci-Hub  domain name as well, though backup domains sci-hub.bz and sci-hub.cc are still active.
Science: http://bit.ly/1X7pppd
TorrentFreak: http://bit.ly/1Oocuh3

US: Government studies the interplay of big data and civil rights
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting the US government has launched its second report on big data, which looks at civil rights and the risks of re-encoding bias and discrimination into algorithmic systems. The report uses case studies drawn from credit and lending, employment, education, and criminal justice to highlight both the risks of embedded bias and the opportunity big data presents to expose it.
White House: http://1.usa.gov/1YqcVYM

The history of automata
----------------------------------------------------------------------
This Public Domain posting uses copious public domain drawings and illustrations to summarise much of the long pre-AI history of automata and show humans' enduring interest in mechanical marvels. The online catalogue from the ongoing exhibition of ancient Greek machinery includes even earlier examples from circa 300 BC, including the earliest known humanoid "robot", which uses gravity to pour and mix drinks.
Public Domain: http://bit.ly/1TSPLc6
Kotsanas: http://bit.ly/1UYXaZJ

Thailand, Hungary, Tanzania, Ireland: The state of human rights
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting, Privacy International summarises the contents of four stakeholder reports it helped write for submission for the 25th session of the United Nations Human Rights Council's Universal Period Review Working Group, which took place in Geneva over the last two weeks. Among the countries due for review were Hungary, the United Republic of Tanzania, Thailand, and Ireland. Among PI's main points: Thailand's draft privacy and surveillance bill threatens to expand surveillance capabilities and increase monitoring of human rights defenders; Tanzania's communications surveillance fails to comply with international law and standards; Hungary's current legal framework for communications surveillance was judged in violation of Article 8 of the Convention by the European Court of Human Rights; and there is concern that Ireland may have been attempting to purchase surveillance malware. 
PI: http://bit.ly/1Ooc1LT

***

DIARY
==============
To see more events recommended by the Information Program team, visit:
https://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:events/. If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

ICOA 2016
----------------------------------------
May 16-17
Montreal, Canada
The 18th International Conference on Open Access aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results about all aspects of Open Access. It also provides the premier interdisciplinary forum for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns, practical challenges encountered and the solutions adopted in the field of Open Access.
http://bit.ly/1XCAD2a

International Conference for E-Democracy and Open Government
----------------------------------------
May 18-20, 2016
Krems, Austria
The International Conference for e-Democracy and Open Government brings together e-democracy, e-participation and open government specialists working in academia, politics, government and business to critically analyse the innovations, issues, ideas and challenges in the networked societies of the digital age.
http://bit.ly/1MPGnmf

Privacy in the Digital Age of Encryption and Anonymity Online
----------------------------------------
May 19-20, 2016
The Hague, Netherlands
This conference on privacy in the digital age of encryption and anonymity online is jointly organised by EIPA and Europol. The main theme of the conference will be the difficulty of balancing privacy and security with a focus on the latest systems of encryption, anonymisation, and pseudonymisation.
http://bit.ly/1p3KDrc

Transparency Camp Europe
----------------------------------------
June 1, 2016
Amsterdam, Netherlands
This unconference will focus on open data, new technologies, and policies that make the EU work for people, stimulate open government, and help grasp the workings of the various EU institutions. The event will include an online app competition.
http://bit.ly/1WuJ445

Health Privacy Summit
----------------------------------------
June 6-7
Washington, DC
The 2016 Health Privacy Summit brings together top national and international experts for serious discussion about global health privacy issues and realistic solutions and to ask, Is Big Data effectively the beginning of the end for privacy in health care?
http://bit.ly/1Qw5AkN

20th International Conference on Electronic Publishing
----------------------------------------
June 7-9, 2016
Göttingen, Germany
ELPUB 2016 will take a fresh look at the current ecosystem of scholarly publishing including the positioning of stakeholders and distribution of economic, technological and discursive power. ELPUB will also open the floor for emerging alternatives in how scholars and citizens interact with scholarly content and what role dissemination and publishing plays in these interactions. Questions to be raised include: What is the core of publishing today? How does agenda setting in emerging frameworks like Open Science function and what is the nature of power of the referring scholarly discourses? How does this relate to the European and world-wide Open Science and Open Innovation agenda of funders and institutions, and how does this look like in publishing practice?
http://bit.ly/1qXdIFo

Personal Democracy Forum
----------------------------------------
June 9-10
New York, NY
The 2016 Personal Democracy Forum will feature speakers such as Danah Boyd, Kate Crawford, Douglas Rushkoff, and Anil Dash.
http://bit.ly/1ExPHDH

Workshop on the Economics of Information Security
----------------------------------------
June 13-14, 2016
Berkeley, CA
The Workshop on the Economics of Information Security (WEIS) is the leading forum for interdisciplinary scholarship on information security and privacy, combining expertise from the fields of economics, social science, business, law, policy, and computer science.
http://bit.ly/1RgmF6w

OR2016 Conference
----------------------------------------
June 13-16, 2016
Dublin, NL
The theme of OR2016 is "Illuminating the World." OR2016 will provide an opportunity to explore the impact of repositories and related infrastructure and processes. 
http://bit.ly/1pcUNp4

SOUPS
----------------------------------------
June 22-24
Denver, Colorado
The 12th Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security will bring together an interdisciplinary group of researchers and practitioners in human computer interaction, security, and privacy. The program will feature technical papers, workshops and tutorials, a poster session, panels and invited talks, and lightning talks.
http://bit.ly/1Tn7bwy

Wikimania
----------------------------------------
June 24-26
Esino Lario, Italy
Wikimania is the annual conference celebrating Wikipedia and its sibling free knowledge projects with conferences, discussions, meetups, training, and a hackathon. Hundreds of volunteer editors come together to learn about and discuss projects, approaches and issues.
http://bit.ly/24m1rci

Jisc and CNI Conference 2016
----------------------------------------
July 6, 2016
Oxford, UK
This year's Joint Information Systems Committee and Coalition for Networked Information conference will bring together leading experts from the US, UK, and Europe to explore the current issues and innovations in digital scholarship and facilitate a rich international exchange on leading practice and policy.
http://bit.ly/238UBnS

21st-Century Literacies for Public Libraries
----------------------------------------
August 10-11, 2016
Philadelphia, PA
At this two-day satellite meeting, presented by IFLA's Public Libraries Section, delegates will share and learn from each other's experiences in developing and delivering services that encompass today's expanded concept of literacy, which includes not only the traditional ability to read and write but proficiency in a range of other literacies such as civic, health, financial, digital, and information.
http://bit.ly/1PZhExo

IFLA World Library and Information Congress
----------------------------------------
August 13-19, 2016
Columbus, OH
The theme of the 82nd IFLA Congress is "Connections. Collaboration. Community." The Congress will feature programmes from myriad library sectors.
http://2016.ifla.org/

Privacy+Security Forum
----------------------------------------
October 24-26, 2016
Washington, DC
Monday, October 24, is devoted to pre-conference workshops and "intensive days" - advanced discussion focused narrowly on a particular topic or industry. Proposals are welcome until April 30, 2016 based on the following guiding principles: bridge the silos between privacy and security; cover issues with depth and rigour; employ interaction, scenario-based learning, and extensive engagement; deliver practical takeaways from each session. 
http://bit.ly/1RIzYhV

Mozilla Festival
----------------------------------------
November 6-8, 2016
London, UK
MozFest is an annual celebration of the open Web. Participants are diverse, including engineers, artists, activists, and educators, but share the common belief that the Web can make lives better, unlocks opportunity, spurs creativity, teaches valuable skills, and connects far-flung people and ideas. The Festival seeks to improve the Web with new ideas and creations.
http://bit.ly/1WmxRQ0

OpenCon
----------------------------------------
November 12-14, 2016
Washington, DC
At this event, the next generation can learn about Open Access, Open Education, and Open Data, develop critical skills, and catalyse action toward a more open system of research and education. OpenCon will convene students and early career academic professionals, both in person and through satellite events around the world and serve as a powerful catalyst for projects led by the next generation to advance OpenCon's three focus areas. 
http://bit.ly/1OocSMD

Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection
----------------------------------------
January 25-27, 2017
Brussels
The tenth CPDP's main theme is artificial intelligence. The conference is accepting proposals for panels in April (from academic consortia, research projects, think tanks, and other research organisations) and May (from individuals wishing to present academic research papers).
http://bit.ly/1OrQSv6

***

Hear more from the Information Program!
================================
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================================
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News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week ending 29 April 2016
====================================================

The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF. Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

Our staff, advisers and major grantees tweet at http://bit.ly/13j5fjq. Current and former grantees featured in this issue: EDRi, EFF, Privacy International.


PROGRAM NEWS
============

NEWS
=====
For breaking news stories, visit: http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:news/

Brazil: Cybercrime proposals threaten free internet
----------------------------------------------------------------------
At The Intercept, Andrew Fishman reports that seven proposals under consideration by the lower house of the Brazilian Congress could threaten the free and open internet in the name of fighting cybercrime. The proposals would allow judges to unilaterally order services blocked; require service providers to comply with warrantless law enforcement requests for users' IP addresses; and expand the scope and penalties of laws against hacking and unauthorised access. Forty-eight civil society groups have joined the Brazilian group Coding Rights to oppose the law. At the Web We Want, Tim Berners-Lee has posted an open letter to Brazilian lawmakers asking them to recommit to the principles of Marco Civil and find alternative ways to fight cybercrime. At the London Review of Books, Perry Anderson gives a detailed account of the political background to the economic troubles that are overshadowing the bill domestically.
Intercept: http://bit.ly/1WssTSV
Web We Want: http://bit.ly/1VE0vyt
LRB: http://bit.ly/21gLja7

US: Supreme Court clears Google Books
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Ars Technica reports that the decade-long Authors Guild challenge to Google Books has ended with the Supreme Court declining to review a lower-court decision in Google's favour. Google has argued that scanning and enabling search of books falls under "fair use". Ars Technica suggests that as a result others could be inspired to undertake other large-scale digitisation projects. In a discussion welcoming the ruling, EFF weighs "fair use creep" against "copyright creep".
Ars Technica: http://bit.ly/1VE0w5p
EFF: http://bit.ly/1pJkIEQ

EU: European Parliament gives and takes away data privacy
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Access Now reports that on April 14 the European Parliament passed the General Data Protection Regulation. The Hunton & Williams blog summarises the improvements to privacy law across the EU: widened scope, broader concept of personal data, and additional obligations for accountability, data breach notification, and consent. However, near-simultaneously, the European Parliament also gave in to mounting political pressure and passed the EU Passenger Name Record Directive. Access Now also notes that the PNR directive passed despite more than 100,000 emails of protest sent to Parliamentarians and the disapproval expressed earlier this year by the Article 29 Working Party. As travel data privacy expert Edward Hasbrouck explains at Papers Please, the PNR directive will require all member states to create a Passenger Information Unit to which all airlines operating flights to or from places outside the EU will have to transmit complete copies of Passenger Name Records. The goal, Hasbrouck writes, is to shift the government's role in air travel from stopping suspects to "pre-crime" predictive policing under which travel would become a privilege instead of a right. EDRi reports on the progress of the ongoing review by the European Court of Justice of a similar agreement between the EU and Canada and notes that a decision is expected in June.
Access Now: http://bit.ly/1QCu0IG
Papers Please: http://bit.ly/1TfMrEZ
EDRi: http://bit.ly/1SS93Bq

Microsoft sues US government over secrecy orders
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The New York Times reports that Microsoft is challenging the legal basis for US Department of Justice secrecy orders, claiming that the way the gag order statute in the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (1986) is being used is unconstitutional. Between September 2015 and March 2016, Microsoft received 5,264 demands for customer information or data in the United States. Nearly half of the requests - 2,576 - included secrecy orders, two-thirds of which had no fixed end date. In its complaint, Microsoft writes that the increase in such requests has "impaired Microsoft's right to be transparent with its customers". At Just Security, Jennifer Dasdal gives a pessimistic legal analysis of the likelihood that Microsoft will succeed in its claim.
NY Times: http://nyti.ms/245luPo
Just Security: http://bit.ly/1SC041E

Ecuador: ISPs and government collaborate to censor the internet
----------------------------------------------------------------------
APC reports that a leaked memo from the multinational ISP Telefónica, the Association of Internet Service Providers of Ecuador (AEPROV), which controls more than 95% of Ecuadorian internet traffic, collaborated with the Ecuadorian government to block users' access to websites. Under vague standards in the Article 8 of the Telecommunications Law, the president of the Republic is allowed to decree a State of Emergency and order content blocking without oversight by an independent and impartial court. Global Voices notes, based on the same leaked memo, that a temporary outage that prevented Ecuadorians' access to Google and YouTube, blamed at the time on a technical glitch was in fact Telefonica's response to a government order.
APC: http://bit.ly/26wHoK5
Global Voices: http://bit.ly/1TfMIIg

UK: Extent of government surveillance revealed
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Privacy International has published a trove of previously confidential documents, which the organisation received as part of disclosure in its legal case against the UK government on "Bulk Personal Datasets". The documents reveal that UK government surveillance, the extent of which has been kept secret from the public and Parliament until now, has seen GCHQ, MI5, and MI6 routinely requisition personal data from public and private sources including financial institutions, databases of people who have signed electronic petitions, and NHS health records. The true extent of surveillance was kept secret even from the Intelligence and Security Committee tasked with overseeing the work of the intelligence agencies. PI also reports that for 19 years the agencies have relied on section 94 of the Telecommunications Act (1984) as the legal basis for much of this surveillance, bypassing the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act (2001), even though the pre-internet legislation was never conceived with this usage in mind.
PI (release): http://bit.ly/1NCrwQa
PI (legal): http://bit.ly/1TydQVn

Sweden: Supreme Court rules against Freedom of Panorama
----------------------------------------------------------------------
EDRi reports that on April 4 the Swedish Supreme Court ruled against "Freedom of Panorama". The case, Wikimedia v. BUS, involved a claim by the Swedish Visual Arts Copyright Society (BUS) that Wikimedia had violated copyright law by allowing posters to the Offentligkonst.se site to upload pictures of public art. BUS claimed that an exception in Swedish law allowing the public to make derivative works, such as photographs and paintings, applied only to printed materials. Freedom of Panorama is limited in other Scandinavian countries: in Denmark, Finland, and Norway it applies only to architecture.
EDRi: http://bit.ly/1SuIhgr


FEATURES AND ANALYSIS
====================
For more features and analysis selected by the Program team, visit:
http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:oped/

Is Open Access To Research Biden's Answer To Curing Cancer?
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article for Forbes, Lindsey Tepe outlines President Joe Biden's recent speech to the annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research, in which he promoted data sharing and open access publication as crucial elements in the "cancer moonshot" proposed by President Barack Obama in January.
Forbes: http://onforb.es/1VUkhpI

Privacy, Big Data, and regulating for use
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this webcast, of her recent lecture at Brown University, "Must Privacy Give Way to Use Regulation?", NYU professor Helen Nissenbaum rebuts those who claim that we should not attempt to regulate data collection but only data use, a view she calls "big data exceptionalism". She frames the problem as one of "domination", the power of the collector to interfere with the life of the person whose data is collected.
Brown: http://bit.ly/1QCuQ8s

How a cashless society could embolden Big Brother
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article at the Atlantic, Sarah Jeong argues that the cashless society could facilitate increased surveillance and "financial censorship". As examples she cites Operation Choke Point, a programme under which the US Department of Justice sought to discourage or shut down exploitative payday lenders, as well as other efforts to shut down payment channels to firearms vendors, advertising sites for sex workers, and others such as Wikileaks. Bitcoin is a useful bypass channel, she argues, as long as it's not a federal priority.
Atlantic: http://theatln.tc/1T6Gaeq

The web we want: how to tackle online abuse
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this series, the Guardian tackles the problem of online abuse and considers what should be done about it. Most significantly, the newspaper discloses the results of a study of the 70 million comments posted since 2010 on its own system, 2% of which have been blocked by moderators. The study found that articles written by women consistently attracted more blocked comments than articles written by men, and that this was especially true of the male-dominated areas of the newspaper. A former Guardian moderator discusses his five years on the job and how to improve the civility of online discourse. At The Verge, Catherine Buni and Soraya Chemaly discuss the history of online moderation, beginning with YouTube in the mid-2000s, attempting to reveal details that, they write, until now have been treated by site owners as trade secrets.
Guardian (series): http://bit.ly/1SC0aXf
Guardian (comments history): http://bit.ly/1NCsKe6
Guardian (moderator): http://bit.ly/1XWSgLC
Verge: http://bit.ly/1VE0xXb

Asia: Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership agreement echoes TPP
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting, EFF compares the intellectual property provisions of the secretive pan-Asian Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP) trade agreement, recently leaked by Knowledge Ecology International, with the equivalent provisions of the Trans-Pacific Partnership. Negotiating nations include India, China, Japan, and Korea, but not the US. EFF concludes that, absent the influence of Hollywood lobbyists, RCEP avoids some of the worst TPP provisions, such as the extension of copyright term, the prescriptive ISP liability regime, the most restrictive DRM provisions, and the expansion of trade secrets law. However, other provisions, most notably on enforcement, are largely unchanged from TPP. Like TPP, RCEP is being negotiated in secret. The Hindu notes that the RCEP draft proposes tough curbs on cheap medicines.
EFF: http://bit.ly/1SMmnnI
Hindu: http://bit.ly/1N2kt36

Automating EveryPolitician
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog post, mySociety outlines its EveryPolitician project and introduces the EveryPolitician bot, which blogs (at Medium) the site's many data changes. EveryPolitician is mySociety's effort to make data available on every politician in the world. The site has so far collected and begun sharing 2.9 million pieces of data on over 68,652 people.
mySociety: http://bit.ly/1WUbq6y

***

DIARY
==============
To see more events recommended by the Information Program team, visit:
https://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:events/. If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

Laura Poitras at the Whitney Museum
----------------------------------------
February 5-May 1, 2016
New York, NY
Oscar and Pulitzer Prize-winning Laura Poitras, best known for her documentary film about Edward Snowden, CITIZENFOUR, has turned her journal and FBI files into an exhibit at New York's Whitney Museum documenting her life under surveillance. LAURA POITRAS: ASTRO NOISE is an immersive installation of new work building on topics Poitras has investigated in previous film work, including mass surveillance, the war on terror, the U.S. drone program, Guantánamo Bay Prison, occupation, and torture.
http://bit.ly/1QbMuq2

Nervous Systems: Quantified Life and the Social Question
----------------------------------------
March 10-May 9, 2016
Berlin, Germany
Artists, media historians, and writers collaborate to produce a range of reflections on the quantified self for this exhibition at the Haus der Kulturen der Welt. The exhibition includes "The White Room", a live installation by Tactical Tech that includes consultations, demos, and discussions.
http://bit.ly/21fsO9Y

Second African Public Libraries Summit
----------------------------------------
April 30-May 1, 2016
eZulwini, Swaziland
The African Library and Information Association and Institutions (AfLIA)'s two-day summit will be held as a post-conference event of the SCECSAL Conference which will also be held in Swaziland. Co-sponsored by the Global Libraries Program of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the summit's theme will be "21st Century Public Libraries - innovation develops communities".
http://bit.ly/1rBE9Bj

ICOA 2016
----------------------------------------
May 16-17
Montreal, Canada
The 18th International Conference on Open Access aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results about all aspects of Open Access. It also provides the premier interdisciplinary forum for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns, practical challenges encountered and the solutions adopted in the field of Open Access.
http://bit.ly/1XCAD2a

International Conference for E-Democracy and Open Government
----------------------------------------
May 18-20, 2016
Krems, Austria
The International Conference for e-Democracy and Open Government brings together e-democracy, e-participation and open government specialists working in academia, politics, government and business to critically analyse the innovations, issues, ideas and challenges in the networked societies of the digital age.
http://bit.ly/1MPGnmf

Privacy in the Digital Age of Encryption and Anonymity Online
----------------------------------------
May 19-20, 2016
The Hague, Netherlands
This conference on privacy in the digital age of encryption and anonymity online is jointly organised by EIPA and Europol. The main theme of the conference will be the difficulty of balancing privacy and security with a focus on the latest systems of encryption, anonymisation, and pseudonymisation.
http://bit.ly/1p3KDrc

Health Privacy Summit
----------------------------------------
June 6-7
Washington, DC
The 2016 Health Privacy Summit brings together top national and international experts for serious discussion about global health privacy issues and realistic solutions and to ask, Is Big Data effectively the beginning of the end for privacy in health care?
http://bit.ly/1Qw5AkN

20th International Conference on Electronic Publishing
----------------------------------------
June 7-9, 2016
Göttingen, Germany
ELPUB 2016 will take a fresh look at the current ecosystem of scholarly publishing including the positioning of stakeholders and distribution of economic, technological and discursive power. ELPUB will also open the floor for emerging alternatives in how scholars and citizens interact with scholarly content and what role dissemination and publishing plays in these interactions. Questions to be raised include: What is the core of publishing today? How does agenda setting in emerging frameworks like Open Science function and what is the nature of power of the referring scholarly discourses? How does this relate to the European and world-wide Open Science and Open Innovation agenda of funders and institutions, and how does this look like in publishing practice?
http://bit.ly/1qXdIFo

Personal Democracy Forum
----------------------------------------
June 9-10
New York, NY
The 2016 Personal Democracy Forum will feature speakers such as Danah Boyd, Kate Crawford, Douglas Rushkoff, and Anil Dash.
http://bit.ly/1ExPHDH

Workshop on the Economics of Information Security
----------------------------------------
June 13-14, 2016
Berkeley, CA
The Workshop on the Economics of Information Security (WEIS) is the leading forum for interdisciplinary scholarship on information security and privacy, combining expertise from the fields of economics, social science, business, law, policy, and computer science.
http://bit.ly/1RgmF6w

OR2016 Conference
----------------------------------------
June 13-16, 2016
Dublin, NL
The theme of OR2016 is "Illuminating the World." OR2016 will provide an opportunity to explore the impact of repositories and related infrastructure and processes.
http://bit.ly/1pcUNp4

SOUPS
----------------------------------------
June 22-24
Denver, Colorado
The 12th Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security will bring together an interdisciplinary group of researchers and practitioners in human computer interaction, security, and privacy. The program will feature technical papers, workshops and tutorials, a poster session, panels and invited talks, and lightning talks.
http://bit.ly/1Tn7bwy

Wikimania
----------------------------------------
June 24-26
Esino Lario, Italy
Wikimania is the annual conference celebrating Wikipedia and its sibling free knowledge projects with conferences, discussions, meetups, training, and a hackathon. Hundreds of volunteer editors come together to learn about and discuss projects, approaches and issues.
http://bit.ly/24m1rci

Jisc and CNI Conference 2016
----------------------------------------
July 6, 2016
Oxford, UK
This year's Joint Information Systems Committee and Coalition for Networked Information conference will bring together leading experts from the US, UK, and Europe to explore the current issues and innovations in digital scholarship and facilitate a rich international exchange on leading practice and policy.
http://bit.ly/238UBnS

21st-Century Literacies for Public Libraries
----------------------------------------
August 10-11, 2016
Philadelphia, PA
At this two-day satellite meeting, presented by IFLA's Public Libraries Section, delegates will share and learn from each other's experiences in developing and delivering services that encompass today's expanded concept of literacy, which includes not only the traditional ability to read and write but proficiency in a range of other literacies such as civic, health, financial, digital, and information.
http://bit.ly/1PZhExo

IFLA World Library and Information Congress
----------------------------------------
August 13-19, 2016
Columbus, OH
The theme of the 82nd IFLA Congress is "Connections. Collaboration. Community." The Congress will feature programmes from myriad library sectors.
http://2016.ifla.org/

Privacy+Security Forum
----------------------------------------
October 24-26, 2016
Washington, DC
Monday, October 24, is devoted to pre-conference workshops and "intensive days" - advanced discussion focused narrowly on a particular topic or industry. Proposals are welcome until April 30, 2016 based on the following guiding principles: bridge the silos between privacy and security; cover issues with depth and rigour; employ interaction, scenario-based learning, and extensive engagement; deliver practical takeaways from each session.
http://bit.ly/1RIzYhV

Mozilla Festival
----------------------------------------
November 6-8, 2016
London, UK
MozFest is an annual celebration of the open Web. Participants are diverse, including engineers, artists, activists, and educators, but share the common belief that the Web can make lives better, unlocks opportunity, spurs creativity, teaches valuable skills, and connects far-flung people and ideas. The Festival seeks to improve the Web with new ideas and creations.
http://bit.ly/1WmxRQ0

Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection
----------------------------------------
January 25-27, 2017
Brussels
The tenth CPDP's main theme is artificial intelligence. The conference is accepting proposals for panels in April (from academic consortia, research projects, think tanks, and other research organisations) and May (from individuals wishing to present academic research papers).
http://cpdpconferences.org

***

Hear more from the Information Program!
================================
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Hear less from the Information Program!
================================
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News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week ending 15 April 2016
====================================================

The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF. Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

Our staff, advisers and major grantees tweet at http://bit.ly/13j5fjq. Current and former grantees featured in this issue: EFF, ProPublica, La Quadrature du Net, Privacy International, Sunlight Foundation.


PROGRAM NEWS
============

Scholarships available: International Copyright, Privacy Law and Policy
----------------------------------------
July 4-8, 2016-03-17
Amsterdam, Netherlands
OSF is offering eight scholarships covering fees, travel, and accommodation for civil society participants to attend two summer courses on international copyright law and on privacy law at the Institute for Information Law (IViR) at the University of Amsterdam. More information on how to apply is available here:
http://bit.ly/1S6ec37


NEWS
=====
For breaking news stories, visit: http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:news/

"Panama papers" expose secret parallel universe of billionaires
----------------------------------------
At the Huffington Post, "economic hit man" John Perkins writes about the origins of and his involvement in the system exposed by the leak to Germany's Suddeutsche Zeitung of the "Panama Papers", 11 million documents from the files of the law firm Mossack Fonseca. When corporations have more power than sovereign nations, he writes, it's time for change. The Guardian reports on the angry response in Iceland, where the prime minister, two cabinet ministers, a former bank governor, and 600 other citizens appeared in the papers linked to offshore holdings. Should an election be called, the copyright-busting Pirate Party is leading in the polls. AllAfrica calls the revelations "a moral problem, a problem of greed". In a one-hour documentary, "The Panama Papers: Secrets of the Super Rich", Australia's ABC's investigation studies the uncovered "parallel universe" exposed in the papers and links it to the electric bills paid by Australian consumers. In a televised discussion including economists and journalists who have studied the papers for the last year, France24 explains the history and workings of international tax structures, the leveraging against each other of sovereign nations' laws, and the prospects for change.
HuffPo: http://huff.to/1qQxOBS
Guardian: http://bit.ly/1Sz5Eky
AllAfrica: http://bit.ly/1S6exCF
ABC: http://ab.co/1WrmAzk
France24: http://bit.ly/1YthnWa

EU-US Privacy Shield
-------------------------------------
The Article 29 Working Party has issued its opinion on the EU-US Privacy Shield, calling it a significant improvement over Safe Harbor but criticising it on the ground that it does not adhere sufficiently to the data protection principles; that the US's new redress mechanism may be unusable; that the agreement does not preclude massive surveillance; and that the proposed ombudsman will be insufficiently independent. In an analysis of winners and losers under the arrangement, World Privacy Forum director Pam Dixon and privacy legal scholar Robert Gellman conclude that the Shield's provisions are mixed for all concerned. Privacy International's analysis is less optimistic, arguing that the Shield does little to limit bulk data collection, US government surveillance, insufficiently implements the standards of necessity and proportionality, and has a weak oversight mechanism as the Ombudsman will be appointed by and report to the US Secretary of State.
WP29 (PDF): http://bit.ly/1qUz7j5
World Privacy Forum: http://bit.ly/1Q6ycQJ
Privacy International: http://bit.ly/1S6hFi6

Liberia: Outsourcing primary education
----------------------------------------------------------------------
AllAfrica reports that UN special rapporteur Kishore Singh has openly attacked Liberia's plan to outsource all its primary and pre-primary education over the next five years to the US-based company Bridge International Academies, calling it a "blatant violation of Liberia's international obligations under the right to education". InDepthNews gives more background on Bridge, which already operates in Kenya, Nigeria, and Uganda, and uses a highly standardised, technology-driven model. Liberia will pay Bridge $65 million under the arrangement, and parents will pay $5 to $7 a month, not including school meals. Vox discusses the trade-offs and offers financial details about Bridge, a San Francisco-based start-up whose investors include Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg, the World Bank's International Finance Corporation, the UK government's Department for International Development, and Bill Gates.
AllAfrica: http://bit.ly/23E51OG
InDepthNews: http://bit.ly/1qosJQ8
Vox: http://bit.ly/1NnZt1q

Colombian hacker admits rigging elections throughout South America
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Bloomberg interviews 31-year-old Andrés Sepúlveda, who is serving prison time for rigging elections throughout South America for more than a decade and says he wants to tell his story because people do not understand the power hackers have over modern elections or the specialised skills needed to stop them. Sepúlveda contends that operations like his are in place on every continent, a claim a security consultant is quoted as calling plausible. Townhall responds with a discussion of how easy it would be to steal the upcoming US election via electronic voting.
Bloomberg: https://bitly.com/a/bitlinks
Townhall: http://bit.ly/23E5hgx

WhatsApp rolls out encryption to 1 billion users
----------------------------------------------------------------------
EFF's Bill Buddington reports that on March 31 Facebook subsidiary WhatsApp enabled end-to-end 256-bit encryption by default for its chat and call functionality, calling the move's importance impossible to overstate: "...in one fell swoop moved the user base of end-to-end encryption from those protecting trade secrets, enthused crypto-hobbyists, and whistleblowers to an actually significant portion of the world population". At the Guardian, John Naughton agrees, but notes that compromising the phone on which WhatsApp runs is still a viable way of accessing message contents, and links that reality to the "equipment interference" provisions in the UK's Investigatory Powers bill. India Today reports that the move has "probably" made WhatsApp illegal in India under a 2007 law that made it illegal to use encryption stronger than 40-bit without explicit government permission.
EFF: http://bit.ly/1VlBWWu
Guardian: http://bit.ly/1VUr3tH
India Today: http://bit.ly/1NnZz92

EU: Radio Directive threatens free software
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Ars Technica UK reports that clauses in the 2015/53/EU Directive on the market for radio equipment, now being transposed into national laws, threaten to eliminate consumers' freedom to choose the software they like for any device that incorporates a radio (that is, mobile, wifi, and other connections), and severely damage initiatives aimed at reducing the digital divide and encouraging citizen ownership of Internet networks and devices. The Free Software Foundation Europe and 22 other organisations including La Quadrature du Net, the Chaos Computer Club, and the OpenNet Initiative, have issued a joint statement expressing their concerns; in addition, La Quadrature du Net has written a letter to the French Ministry of Budget and the French Telecom Regulator asking them to include Recital 19, which ensures that the required compliance should not be abused to prevent the independent use of third-party software, in the legislation.
Ars Technica: http://bit.ly/1T3wYdQ
FSFE: http://bit.ly/1qHEGBc
Quadrature: http://bit.ly/1SMq36a

IP address location error causes havoc for Kansas farm
----------------------------------------------------------------------
A key plank in law enforcement efforts, particularly copyright violations, is often assuming IP addresses can be accurately mapped to specific users. At Fusion, Kashmir Hill reports that over the last 14 years a kludge in Maxmind, software, which maps IP addresses to geographical locations, has assigned more than 600 million IP addresses to the default location of one small family farm in Potwin, Kansas, approximately the geographical centre of the United States. In that time, the farm's residents have been repeatedly harassed and accused of identity fraud, spamming, IP spoofing, and many other types of criminal activities without ever knowing why. Hill unearths many other examples.
Fusion: http://fus.in/1TQTubY

MIT's Data USA
----------------------------------------------------------------------
This Sunlight Foundation article welcomes MIT's new Data USA site, which aims to make government data easier to parse. The New York Times describes the site as effectively designed like a search engine, setting out to "transform data into stories" by making assumptions about what users are most likely to want to know.
Sunlight: http://bit.ly/1VlCyvs
NY Times: http://nyti.ms/1N8b7T9
Data USA: http://bit.ly/1V0Y4pb


FEATURES AND ANALYSIS
====================
For more features and analysis selected by the Program team, visit:
http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:oped/

How a trademark dispute broke the web
----------------------------------------------------------------------
This Quartz article illustrates the fragility of the patchwork of software that runs the web. On March 22, in response to legal threats, open-source developer Azer Koçulu opted to "unpublish" 273 software packages stored with the npm repository. Because so much software ia set to update automatically, the deletion of one of Koçulu's most widely used packages, an 11-line module called "left-pad", almost immediately began halting the many JavaScript programs around the world that used it; one of these, React, helps run many major websites, including Facebook. The software was restored after two hours.
Quartz: http://bit.ly/23E7Cbd

Ownership and the Internet of Things
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting, EFF discusses the future of ownership in response to the widely reported news that on May 15 Revolv, bought in 2014 by Google's Nest subsidiary, will shut down the app that runs all connections to the Revolv smart home hub, rendering all Revolv equipment inoperable. Business Insider says the Revolv acquisition was widely viewed as an "acqui-hire" - that is, aimed at acquiring the people rather than the business. In a furious posting on Medium, Revolv owner Arlo Gilbert discusses how he used the technology and takes issue with Nest's decision. Gizmodo reports that since the angry public response Nest has indicated it will help Revolv owners on a "case by case" basis.
EFF: http://bit.ly/1VUsVTo
Business Insider: http://bit.ly/25ZAZac
Medium: http://bit.ly/1YtjmtM
Gizmodo: http://bit.ly/23E7NDr

Knowledge Unbound
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The MIT Press is offering leading open access advocate Peter Suber's new book, Knowledge Unbound: Selected Writings on Open Access, 2002-2011, for free download in a variety of formats. The book offers a selection of some of Suber's most significant and influential writings on open access from 2002 to 2010. In it, Suber makes the case for open access to research; answers common questions, objections, and misunderstandings; analyses policy issues; and documents the growth and evolution of open access during its most critical early decade.
MIT Press: http://bit.ly/1SMqJIC

Robots and the law
----------------------------------------------------------------------
This page links to the live video streams from the We Robot conference, held April 1-2 in Miami, as well as slides from the (not-streamed) workshops that preceded it. Speakers examined the free speech rights of AIs (under the First Amendment, the barriers are surprisingly few); whether robot policemen could be racially neutral; and the "moral crumple zones" humans may become in machine-human partnerships. Wendy M. Grossman summarizes the conference's major themes in a net.wars posting. At the Discourse blog, he conference's main organizers, Ryan Calo and Michael Froomkin, launch their new book, Robots and the Law.
We Robot: http://bit.ly/1qouUDp
net.wars: http://bit.ly/1MtP5ud
Discourse: http://bit.ly/1No0Q06

Decrypting encryption
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this three-animation series, Decrypting Encryption, Tactical Tech explains the workings of the encryption/decryption tool GNU Privacy Guard (GPG), including what "symmetric" and "asymmetric" types of encryption are and how to check the public key and unique fingerprints of the person you're corresponding with to verify their identity.
TacticalTech: http://bit.ly/23tYc5H

New England Journal of Medicine under attack
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article, jointly published with the Boston Globe, ProPublica reports that the venerable and venerated New England Journal of Medicine is falling out of step as others such as the British Medical Journal move to adopt requirements to publish experimental data and espouse open access. Earlier this year, NEJM editor-in-chief Jeffrey M. Drazen called researchers who seek to replicate others' work "research parasites"; in 2015 the journal ran a series calling concerns about conflicts of interest in medicine oversimplified and overblown. More recent critics, such as a group led by the British doctor and writer Ben Goldacre, say their complaints have been dismissed.
ProPublica: http://bit.ly/1TQUBZp


***

DIARY
==============
To see more events recommended by the Information Program team, visit:
https://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:events/. If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

Laura Poitras at the Whitney Museum
----------------------------------------
February 5-May 1, 2016
New York, NY
Oscar and Pulitzer Prize-winning Laura Poitras, best known for her documentary film about Edward Snowden, CITIZENFOUR, has turned her journal and FBI files into an exhibit at New York's Whitney Museum documenting her life under surveillance. LAURA POITRAS: ASTRO NOISE is an immersive installation of new work building on topics Poitras has investigated in previous film work, including mass surveillance, the war on terror, the U.S. drone program, Guantánamo Bay Prison, occupation, and torture.
http://bit.ly/1QbMuq2

Nervous Systems: Quantified Life and the Social Question
----------------------------------------
March 10-May 9, 2016
Berlin, Germany
Artists, media historians, and writers collaborate to produce a range of reflections on the quantified self for this exhibition at the Haus der Kulturen der Welt. The exhibition includes "The White Room", a live installation by Tactical Tech that includes consultations, demos, and discussions.
http://bit.ly/21fsO9Y

OER16: Open Culture
----------------------------------------
April 19-20
Edinburgh, Scotland
The vision for the conference is to focus on the value proposition of embedding open culture into institutional strategies for learning, teaching, and research. Conference chairs are Melissa Highton, Director of Learning, Teaching, and Web Services at the University of Edinburgh, and Lorna Campbell, OER Liaison at the University of Edinburgh and EDINA Digital Education Manager.
http://bit.ly/1PVLBRj

Tomorrow's Transactions Forum
April 20-21
London, UK
----------------------------------------
Consult Hyperion's annual conference lets anyone interested in the future of electronic transactions debate and discuss any and all ideas, no matter how apparently wacky (such as those that appear in the art competition). Intervention and interaction are welcome; product presentations are banned.
http://bit.ly/1Qc84Fx

The Science of Consciousness
----------------------------------------
April 25-30
Tucson, Arizona
A week-long gathering of 800 to 900 scientists, philosophers, artists, meditators, and interested people from 50 countries will consider questions like: Will consciousness be reproduced through brain mapping, transhumanism and/or artificial intelligence? Or, does the brain "tune into" and organize consciousness or its precursors existing naturally in the universe? What are the implications of either view on the nature of existence, and treatment of mental and cognitive disorders?
http://bit.ly/1VozSxI

TICTeC 2016
----------------------------------------
April 27-29, 2016
Barcelona, Spain
The Impacts of Civic Technology Conference will focus on the impact of civic technology and digital democracy on citizens, decision makers, and governments around the world and discuss themes of engagement, participation, institution, social behaviour, politics, community, digital capability, communication, and ethics relating to the use and study of civic technology.
http://bit.ly/1Qw5kCe

SCECSAL XXII
April 25-29, 2016
eZulwini, Swaziland
Swaziland Library Association (SWALA) hosts the 22nd Standing Conference of Eastern, Central and Southern African Libraries Association. This year's theme is Digital Transformation and the changing role of libraries and Information Centres in the sustainable development of Africa.
http://scecsal.eu.pn/

Second African Public Libraries Summit
----------------------------------------
April 30-May 1, 2016
eZulwini, Swaziland
The African Library and Information Association and Institutions (AfLIA)'s two-day summit will be held as a post-conference event of the SCECSAL Conference which will also be held in Swaziland. Co-sponsored by the Global Libraries Program of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the summit's theme will be "21st Century Public Libraries - innovation develops communities".
http://aflia.net/web/pages/news-events/2nd-african-public-lbraries-summit-2

ICOA 2016
----------------------------------------
May 16-17
Montreal, Canada
The 18th International Conference on Open Access aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results about all aspects of Open Access. It also provides the premier interdisciplinary forum for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns, practical challenges encountered and the solutions adopted in the field of Open Access.
http://bit.ly/1XCAD2a

International Conference for E-Democracy and Open Government
----------------------------------------
May 18-20, 2016
Krems, Austria
The International Conference for e-Democracy and Open Government brings together e-democracy, e-participation and open government specialists working in academia, politics, government and business to critically analyse the innovations, issues, ideas and challenges in the networked societies of the digital age.
http://bit.ly/1MPGnmf

Privacy in the Digital Age of Encryption and Anonymity Online
----------------------------------------
May 19-20, 2016
The Hague, Netherlands
This conference on privacy in the digital age of encryption and anonymity online is jointly organised by EIPA and Europol. The main theme of the conference will be the difficulty of balancing privacy and security with a focus on the latest systems of encryption, anonymisation, and pseudonymisation.
http://bit.ly/1p3KDrc

Health Privacy Summit
----------------------------------------
June 6-7
Washington, DC
The 2016 Health Privacy Summit brings together top national and international experts for serious discussion about global health privacy issues and realistic solutions and to ask, Is Big Data effectively the beginning of the end for privacy in health care?
http://bit.ly/1Qw5AkN

20th International Conference on Electronic Publishing
----------------------------------------
June 7-9, 2016
Göttingen, Germany
ELPUB 2016 will take a fresh look at the current ecosystem of scholarly publishing including the positioning of stakeholders and distribution of economic, technological and discursive power. ELPUB will also open the floor for emerging alternatives in how scholars and citizens interact with scholarly content and what role dissemination and publishing plays in these interactions. Questions to be raised include: What is the core of publishing today? How does agenda setting in emerging frameworks like Open Science function and what is the nature of power of the referring scholarly discourses? How does this relate to the European and world-wide Open Science and Open Innovation agenda of funders and institutions, and how does this look like in publishing practice?

Personal Democracy Forum
----------------------------------------
June 9-10
New York, NY
The 2016 Personal Democracy Forum will feature speakers such as Danah Boyd, Kate Crawford, Douglas Rushkoff, and Anil Dash.
http://bit.ly/1ExPHDH

Workshop on the Economics of Information Security
----------------------------------------
June 13-14, 2016
Berkeley, CA
The Workshop on the Economics of Information Security (WEIS) is the leading forum for interdisciplinary scholarship on information security and privacy, combining expertise from the fields of economics, social science, business, law, policy, and computer science.
http://bit.ly/1RgmF6w

OR2016 Conference
----------------------------------------
June 13-16, 2016
Dublin, NL
The theme of OR2016 is "Illuminating the World." OR2016 will provide an opportunity to explore the impact of repositories and related infrastructure and processes.
http://bit.ly/1pcUNp4

SOUPS
----------------------------------------
June 22-24
Denver, Colorado
The 12th Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security will bring together an interdisciplinary group of researchers and practitioners in human computer interaction, security, and privacy. The program will feature technical papers, workshops and tutorials, a poster session, panels and invited talks, and lightning talks.
http://bit.ly/1Tn7bwy

Wikimania
----------------------------------------
June 24-26
Esino Lario, Italy
Wikimania is the annual conference celebrating Wikipedia and its sibling free knowledge projects with conferences, discussions, meetups, training, and a hackathon. Hundreds of volunteer editors come together to learn about and discuss projects, approaches and issues.

21st-Century Literacies for Public Libraries
----------------------------------------
August 10-11, 2016
Philadelphia, PA
At this two-day satellite meeting, presented by IFLA's Public Libraries Section, delegates will share and learn from each other's experiences in developing and delivering services that encompass today's expanded concept of literacy, which includes not only the traditional ability to read and write but proficiency in a range of other literacies such as civic, health, financial, digital, and information.
http://bit.ly/1PZhExo

IFLA World Library and Information Congress
----------------------------------------
August 13-19, 2016
Columbus, OH
The theme of the 82nd IFLA Congress is "Connections. Collaboration. Community." The Congress will feature programmes from myriad library sectors.
http://2016.ifla.org/

Privacy+Security Forum
----------------------------------------
October 24-26, 2016
Washington, DC
Monday, October 24, is devoted to pre-conference workshops and "intensive days" - advanced discussion focused narrowly on a particular topic or industry. Proposals are welcome until April 30, 2016 based on the following guiding principles: bridge the silos between privacy and security; cover issues with depth and rigour; employ interaction, scenario-based learning, and extensive engagement; deliver practical takeaways from each session.
http://bit.ly/1RIzYhV

Mozilla Festival
----------------------------------------
November 6-8, 2016
London, UK
MozFest is an annual celebration of the open Web. Participants are diverse, including engineers, artists, activists, and educators, but share the common belief that the Web can make lives better, unlocks opportunity, spurs creativity, teaches valuable skills, and connects far-flung people and ideas. The Festival seeks to improve the Web with new ideas and creations.
http://bit.ly/1WmxRQ0

***

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News digest | Open Society Information Program | 23 March 2016
====================================================

The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF. Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

Our staff, advisers and major grantees tweet at http://bit.ly/13j5fjq.


NEWS
=====
For breaking news stories, visit: http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:news/

US: Google role in US foreign policy emerges from Clinton emails
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Wikileaks has released a searchable archive of more than 30,000 of Hillary Clinton's emails, which have been released under FOIA by the US State Department. The emails date from the period in which she was serving as Secretary of State; Clinton wrote about 7,500 of them. RT reports that among the trove are messages showing that Google Jigsaw head Jared Cohen, Al-Jazeera, and Clinton's State Department conspired to effect regime change in Syria. Breitbart finds evidence that Clinton worked with Google and YouTube to block access to the independent film she claimed was responsible for the 2012 Benghazi attacks. Wired's Kim Zetter reveals that Clinton's choice to use a private email server was driven by the NSA's refusal to provide a secure Blackberry like the one issued to President Barack Obama.
https://wikileaks.org/clinton-emails/https://www.rt.com/op-edge/336408-google-this-hillary-clinton-emails/
http://www.breitbart.com/tech/2016/03/18/wikileaks-publishes-searchable-hillary-clinton-email-archive/
http://www.wired.com/2016/03/security-news-week-nsa-denied-hillary-secure-blackberry/

US: Department of Justice calls a halt in Apple encryption case
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The New York Times reports that after 12 filings in which the Department of Justice claimed it could not access the contents of the phone belonging to San Bernardino shooter Syed Rizwan Farook, the DoJ has now said a third party has shown them a method that may work without Apple's assistance. The case has been postponed, and the DoJ will file a status report on April 5. Fortune has published a full transcript of President Barack Obama's 12-minute sXSW speech, in which he argued for finding a compromise granting law enforcement access to encrypted data. The speech has been widely criticised, for example by Harvard Law professor and former Obama advisor Susan Crawford, as a form of magical thinking, both mathematical and legal; Crawford believes his proposals contravene the Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (1994). In a lengthy interview with Time magazine, Apple CEO Tim Cook calls Apple's fight with the FBI a "bad dream". Gizmodo reveals the 18-month background to the present dispute, which began when Apple gave the FBI a pre-release copy of iOS8 for study. Wired's Kim Zetter reports that a government redaction error has confirmed long-held suspicions that the user targeted by the US government demands that led Ladar Levison to shut down the Lavabit private messaging service was indeed Edward Snowden. Those inside the US can enjoy this video clip, in which "Last Week Tonight" show host John Oliver devises an ad for Apple's cryptography.
http://fortune.com/2016/03/12/obama-sxsw-apple-vs-fbi/
https://backchannel.com/the-law-is-clear-the-fbi-cannot-make-apple-rewrite-its-os-9ae60c3bbc7b#.v2liappon
http://time.com/4262480/tim-cook-apple-fbi-2/
http://gizmodo.com/bloomberg-apple-fbi-scrap-started-when-ios-8-was-share-1766107055
http://www.wired.com/2016/03/lavabit-apple-fbi/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zsjZ2r9Ygzw

Russia: plans to fine websites that provide circumvention tools
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Global Voices reports that the Russian media regulator, Roscomnadzor, proposes to introduce fines of RUB3,000-5,000 (USD $43-73) for individuals or officials RUB50,000-100,000 (USD $730-1460) for corporate entities whose web pages provide online circumvention tools that allow users to access blocked web pages, dubbing these "propaganda". Under the proposals, mirror versions of blocked websites attract the same fines as their originals. Although the restrictions are being framed as helping copyright owners to protect their interests, Global Voices believes the proposals derive from the February 2016 blocking of the website belonging to the Russian internet freedom and human rights organization RosKomSvoboda, which included a page that educates users on how to access blocked sites.
https://globalvoices.org/2016/03/17/russia-plans-to-fine-websites-for-propaganda-of-circumvention-tools/

EU: Geoblocking may contravene single market rules
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The Register reports that the European Commission has said that the contractual agreements behind geoblocking restrictions on access to content and services may contravene the EU's single market regulations. Each case needs to be assessed individually, depending on the terms of the agreement and whether it's between suppliers and distributors or a unilateral decision by a non-dominant company situated outside the EU.
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/03/21/contractual_barriers_behind_geoblocking_could_breach_eu_competition_rules_says_commission/

UK, Ghana: Surveillance bills speeding through Parliament
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The Register reports that in his first report to the Human Rights Commission, UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Privacy in the Digital Age Joseph Cannataci asks the British government to "desist from setting a bad example to other states" and "outlaw rather than legitimise" the bill's provisions on bulk surveillance and bulk hacking. As if to underline Cannataci's point, Privacy International has submitted comments to the Ghanaian Parliament's Defence and Interior Committee calling for it to abandon the planned surveillance bill, which would allow the interception of all communications for "protecting national security" and "fighting crime generally." Privacy International executive director Gus Hosein, writing for the Guardian's Comment is Free, compares US and UK attitudes to surveillance and public debate, and warns that if the bill passes companies like Apple could be forced to help the government spy on their customers. EFF argues that the broadest expansion of powers in the bill, the "filter" police profiling engine, is being overlooked.
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/03/09/un_bad_example_uk_should_outlaw_snoopers_charter_bulk_provisions/
https://privacyinternational.org/node/807
https://privacyinternational.org/node/809
https://www.openrightsgroup.org/blog/2016/the-investigatory-powers-debate-is-missing-one-huge-power-the-filter-or-police-profiling-engine

Scholarships available: International Copyright, Privacy Law and Policy
----------------------------------------
July 4-8, 2016-03-17
Amsterdam, Netherlands
OSF is offering eight scholarships covering fees, travel, and accommodation for civil society participants to attend two summer courses at the Institute for Information Law (IViR) at the University of Amsterdam. The courses are in international copyright law and privacy law and policy. Successful applicants from non-OECD countries will receive a per diem of €30 for the duration of the course. Applicants should complete the form at the course website, indicate in the text box that you are applying for the "OSF Civil Society Scholarship", and enter a statement of approximately 500 words explaining your motivation for attending the summer course you are applying for and how the course would benefit the work of your organisation. Successful applicants will be asked to complete a short report about their experience at the end of the course.
http://www.ivir.nl/courses


FEATURES AND ANALYSIS
====================
For more features and analysis selected by the Program team, visit:
http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:oped/

Adtech and the future of journalism
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this BBC radio programme, "Analysis: The End of Free", Guardian journalist Andrew Brown considers whether ad blocking will end the prevailing internet model of journalism, in which content is free to readers and paid for with advertising. The Guardian reports that many leading French news sites have banded together to refuse access to anyone running ad blockers. On March 2, the Guardian reported that UK Culture Secretary John Whittingdale called ad blocking "a modern-day protection racket"; now, Tripwire reports that this is becoming literally true, as ransomware spreads across popular websites via poisoned ads.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b072j3g6
http://www.theguardian.com/media/2016/mar/22/french-news-sites-block-the-adblockers-telling-readers-to-uninstall-or-lose-access http://www.theguardian.com/media/2016/mar/02/adblocking-protection-racket-john-whittingdale
http://www.tripwire.com/state-of-security/security-data-protection/crypto-ransomware-spreads-via-poisoned-ads-on-major-websites

"Racial marketing" and STRAIGHT OUTTA COMPTON
----------------------------------------------------------------------
This Business Insider article compares the "white" and "black" versions of the trailer for the movie STRAIGHT OUTTA COMPTON that were shown to users on Facebook. In the first version, Universal Pictures chose an educational approach, assuming that whites would be less familiar with the musical careers of the film's stars gangsta rap group N.W.A., whose rise the film chronicles; accordingly the "white" version portrayed the movie as the story of the rise of Dr Dre (the face of Beats headphones) and Ice Cube and the "black" version stressed the film's actual story, the rise of N.W.A. The film was one of the top 20 highest-grossing films of 2015. Because Facebook doesn't require users to identify their race, the advertising segments were identified through affinity groups.
http://uk.businessinsider.com/why-straight-outta-compton-had-different-trailers-for-people-of-different-races

Africa's Netflix does not need Hollywood
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this article at Bloomberg Business, Alexis Okeowo profiles the booming Nigerian film industry. The online Iroko service has put together a catalogue of thousands of "Nollywood" movies, most in English, some in Yoruba. In 2013, Iroko began producing its own content. The upshot, Okeowo argues, is that "Africa's Netflix", which is breaking entirely new ground, does not need Hollywood.
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2016-02-22/the-netflix-of-africa-doesn-t-need-hollywood-to-win

Financial inclusion
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this Guardian article, Dominic Frisby argues that cashlessness will exacerbate social inequality, give the financial sector far more power by placing it at the centre of all transactions, and make all transactions traceable. With about half the world's population unbanked, he maintains that mobile phones have far surpassed landlines because you can get one without a bank account.
http://www.theguardian.com/money/commentisfree/2016/mar/21/fear-cashless-world-contactless

EU: LIBE Committee hearings on Privacy Shield
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Jedidiah Bracy offers a summary of European Parliament committee hearings on the EU-US Privacy Shield agreement last week. Speakers included EPIC's Marc Rotenberg, European Data Protection Supervisor Giovanni Butarelli, Article 29 Working Party chair Isabelle Falque-Pierrotin and privacy practitioners, advocates, and industry representatives.
https://iapp.org/news/a/privacy-shields-validity-debated-in-european-parliament/
video of the hearings: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/ep-live/en/committees/video?event=20160317-1500-COMMITTEE-LIBE


***

DIARY
==============
To see more events recommended by the Information Program team, visit:
https://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:events/. If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

Laura Poitras at the Whitney Museum
----------------------------------------
February 5-May 1, 2016
New York, NY
Oscar and Pulitzer Prize-winning Laura Poitras, best known for her documentary film about Edward Snowden, CITIZENFOUR, has turned her journal and FBI files into an exhibit at New York's Whitney Museum documenting her life under surveillance. LAURA POITRAS: ASTRO NOISE is an immersive installation of new work building on topics Poitras has investigated in previous film work, including mass surveillance, the war on terror, the U.S. drone program, Guantánamo Bay Prison, occupation, and torture.
http://bit.ly/1QbMuq2

Nervous Systems: Quantified Life and the Social Question
----------------------------------------
March 10-May 9, 2016
Berlin, Germany
Artists, media historians, and writers collaborate to produce a range of reflections on the quantified self for this exhibition at the Haus der Kulturen der Welt. The exhibition includes "The White Room", a live installation by Tactical Tech that includes consultations, demos, and discussions.
http://bit.ly/21fsO9Y

Ethical Risk Assessment in Biomedical Big Data
----------------------------------------
March 14-15, 2016
Oxford, UK
The two-day symposium, hosted by the Oxford Internet Institute, in association with the Brocher Foundation, will bring together expertise from academia, medicine, industry, and the non-profit sector to assess the ethical risks posed by a number of emerging Big Data applications. Risk assessment is an important step in understanding the potential impact (effects and consequences) of any emerging technology. Applications across a variety of research, clinical and commercial domains will be analysed, including biobanking, public health surveillance, outbreak monitoring, digital epidemiology, behaviour tracking and profiling, and other types of biomedical research.
http://bit.ly/1YCUTmE

Predictive Analytics and Human Rights
----------------------------------------
The 2016 conference, hosted at the Bernstein Institute for Human Rights at the NYU Law School, will leverage the interdisciplinary strengths of the Robert L. Bernstein Institute to consider the human rights implications of the varied uses of predictive analytics by state actors. As a core part of this endeavour, the conference will examine - and seek to advance - the capacity of human rights practitioners to access, evaluate, and challenge risk assessments made through predictive analytics by governments worldwide.
http://bit.ly/1owT4uV

Transparency Camp Online
----------------------------------------
March 19, 2016
Online
This live, participant-driven unconference happens by video chat and/or phone. Bring a topic, project or challenge that you would love to discuss. All participants are empowered to add a discussion topic to the agenda.
http://bit.ly/1SFJeTh

RightsCon
----------------------------------------
March 30-April 1, 2016
San Francisco, CA
Convened by Access Now, RightsCon is the world's leading conference on the issues at the intersection of internet and human rights. The event brings together visionaries, technologists, business leaders, activists, and government representatives from around the world to build strategies, highlight emerging voices, and showcase new technologies & initiatives in pursuit of tomorrow's internet. March 30 will feature Crypto Summit 2.0, a discussion of global encryption policy.
http://bit.ly/I2ZAUZ

We Robot
----------------------------------------
April 1-2, 2016
Miami, Florida
Founded by law professors Michael Froomkin and Ryan Calo, We Robot is a workshop-style conference at which papers in progress on subjects related to robots, law, and policy are discussed and debated with a goal to improving the quality of scholarship in this developing area.
http://bit.ly/1jtd6TT

Global Privacy Summit
----------------------------------------
April 3-4
Washington, DC
The annual meeting of the International Association of Privacy Professionals. Last year's event included keynotes from journalist Glenn Greenwald, author Sarah Lewis, and Google general counsel Kent Walker.
http://bit.ly/1PVL5Ta

25th World Wide Web Conference
----------------------------------------
April 11-15, 2016
Montreal, Canada
The W3C's World Wide Web Conference is an annual international conference on the topics of the future direction of the World Wide Web. The Conference is an outstanding international forum to present and discuss progress in research, development, standards, and applications of the topics related to the Web.
http://bit.ly/1SrCR32

OER16: Open Culture
----------------------------------------
April 19-20
Edinburgh, Scotland
The vision for the conference is to focus on the value proposition of embedding open culture into institutional strategies for learning, teaching, and research. Conference chairs are Melissa Highton, Director of Learning, Teaching, and Web Services at the University of Edinburgh, and Lorna Campbell, OER Liaison at the University of Edinburgh and EDINA Digital Education Manager.
http://bit.ly/1PVLBRj

Tomorrow's Transactions Forum
April 20-21
London, UK
----------------------------------------
Consult Hyperion's annual conference lets anyone interested in the future of electronic transactions debate and discuss any and all ideas, no matter how apparently wacky (such as those that appear in the art competition). Intervention and interaction are welcome; product presentations are banned.
http://bit.ly/1Qc84Fx

TICTeC 2016
----------------------------------------
April 27-29, 2016
Barcelona, Spain
The Impacts of Civic Technology Conference will focus on the impact of civic technology and digital democracy on citizens, decision makers, and governments around the world and discuss themes of engagement, participation, institution, social behaviour, politics, community, digital capability, communication, and ethics relating to the use and study of civic technology.
http://bit.ly/1Qw5kCe

SCECSAL XXII
April 25-29, 2016
eZulwini, Swaziland
Swaziland Library Association (SWALA) hosts the 22nd Standing Conference of Eastern, Central and Southern African Libraries Association. This year's theme is Digital Transformation and the changing role of libraries and Information Centres in the sustainable development of Africa.
http://scecsal.eu.pn/

Second African Public Libraries Summit
----------------------------------------
April 30-May 1, 2016
eZulwini, Swaziland
The African Library and Information Association and Institutions (AfLIA)'s two-day summit will be held as a post-conference event of the SCECSAL Conference which will also be held in Swaziland. Co-sponsored by the Global Libraries Program of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the summit's theme will be "21st Century Public Libraries - innovation develops communities".
http://aflia.net/web/pages/news-events/2nd-african-public-lbraries-summit-2

ICOA 2016
----------------------------------------
May 16-17
Montreal, Canada
The 18th International Conference on Open Access aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results about all aspects of Open Access. It also provides the premier interdisciplinary forum for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns, practical challenges encountered and the solutions adopted in the field of Open Access.
http://bit.ly/1XCAD2a

International Conference for E-Democracy and Open Government
----------------------------------------
May 18-20, 2016
Krems, Austria
The International Conference for e-Democracy and Open Government brings together e-democracy, e-participation and open government specialists working in academia, politics, government and business to critically analyse the innovations, issues, ideas and challenges in the networked societies of the digital age.
http://bit.ly/1MPGnmf

Privacy in the Digital Age of Encryption and Anonymity Online
----------------------------------------
May 19-20, 2016
The Hague, Netherlands
This conference on privacy in the digital age of encryption and anonymity online is jointly organised by EIPA and Europol. The main theme of the conference will be the difficulty of balancing privacy and security with a focus on the latest systems of encryption, anonymisation, and pseudonymisation.
http://bit.ly/1p3KDrc

Health Privacy Summit
----------------------------------------
June 6-7
Washington, DC
The 2016 Health Privacy Summit brings together top national and international experts for serious discussion about global health privacy issues and realistic solutions and to ask, Is Big Data effectively the beginning of the end for privacy in health care?
http://bit.ly/1Qw5AkN

Personal Democracy Forum
----------------------------------------
June 9-10
New York, NY
The 2016 Personal Democracy Forum will feature speakers such as danah boyd, Kate Crawford, Douglas Rushkoff, and Anil Dash.
http://bit.ly/1ExPHDH

Workshop on the Economics of Information Security
----------------------------------------
June 13-14, 2016
Berkeley, CA
The Workshop on the Economics of Information Security (WEIS) is the leading forum for interdisciplinary scholarship on information security and privacy, combining expertise from the fields of economics, social science, business, law, policy, and computer science.
http://bit.ly/1RgmF6w

OR2016 Conference
----------------------------------------
June 13-16, 2016
Dublin, NL
The theme of OR2016 is "Illuminating the World." OR2016 will provide an opportunity to explore the impact of repositories and related infrastructure and processes.
http://bit.ly/1pcUNp4

SOUPS
----------------------------------------
June 22-24
Denver, Colorado
The 12th Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security will bring together an interdisciplinary group of researchers and practitioners in human computer interaction, security, and privacy. The program will feature technical papers, workshops and tutorials, a poster session, panels and invited talks, and lightning talks.
http://bit.ly/1Tn7bwy

Wikimania
----------------------------------------
June 24-26
Esino Lario, Italy
Wikimania is the annual conference celebrating Wikipedia and its sibling free knowledge projects with conferences, discussions, meetups, training, and a hackathon. Hundreds of volunteer editors come together to learn about and discuss projects, approaches and issues.

21st-Century Literacies for Public Libraries
----------------------------------------
August 10-11, 2016
Philadelphia, PA
At this two-day satellite meeting, presented by IFLA's Public Libraries Section, delegates will share and learn from each other's experiences in developing and delivering services that encompass today's expanded concept of literacy, which includes not only the traditional ability to read and write but proficiency in a range of other literacies such as civic, health, financial, digital, and information.
http://bit.ly/1PZhExo

IFLA World Library and Information Congress
----------------------------------------
August 13-19, 2016
Columbus, OH
The theme of the 82nd IFLA Congress is "Connections. Collaboration. Community." The Congress will feature programmes from myriad library sectors.
http://2016.ifla.org/

Privacy+Security Forum
----------------------------------------
October 24-26, 2016
Washington, DC
Monday, October 24, is devoted to pre-conference workshops and "intensive days" - advanced discussion focused narrowly on a particular topic or industry. Proposals are welcome until April 30, 2016 based on the following guiding principles: bridge the silos between privacy and security; cover issues with depth and rigour; employ interaction, scenario-based learning, and extensive engagement; deliver practical takeaways from each session.
http://bit.ly/1RIzYhV

Mozilla Festival
----------------------------------------
November 6-8, 2016
London, UK
MozFest is an annual celebration of the open Web. Participants are diverse, including engineers, artists, activists, and educators, but share the common belief that the Web can make lives better, unlocks opportunity, spurs creativity, teaches valuable skills, and connects far-flung people and ideas. The Festival seeks to improve the Web with new ideas and creations.
http://bit.ly/1WmxRQ0

***

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================================
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News digest | Open Society Information Program | Week ending 11 March 2016
====================================================

The Information Program NEWS DIGEST, published the second and fourth Thursdays of each month, aims to update colleagues in the Open Society Foundations and friends further afield about the news, opinions and events the Program team have been watching this fortnight. The views expressed in these stories do not necessarily reflect those of the Information Program or the OSF. Prepared by Wendy M. Grossman.

Our staff, advisers and major grantees tweet at http://bit.ly/13j5fjq. Current and former grantees featured in this issue: EDRi, EFF, ORG, Privacy International.


INFORMATION PROGRAM NEWS
====================

Poland pioneers world's first national open textbook program

----------------------------------------------------------------------

At Open Society Voices, OSF staff members Melissa Hagemann and Piroska Hugyecz report on OSF's role in advancing the global Open Educational Resources movement as well as the success of this movement in Poland. At the end of last year, the Polish Ministry of Education, working with the 34-organisation Polish Coalition for Open Education (KOED), launched an open textbook program for the first three years of school. The program complements the existing Digital Schools Pilot Program, launched in 2012, which provided schools with computers and other technology resources. The Ministry of Education estimates that OER will save parents €24 million in the first year and €168 million annually by 2020.

OSF: http://osf.to/21mtNjb



NEWS FROM THE FIELD
===============
For breaking news stories, visit: http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:news/

Brazil: Facebook vice-president arrested
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The Guardian reports that police in São Paolo have arrested Facebook regional vice-president Diego Dzonadar because Facebook, despite daily fines of first 50,000 rials and then 1 million rials, had failed for more than a month to provide messages sent using its WhatsApp service, requested as part of a criminal investigation. Facebook argues that WhatsApp has no local subsidiary in Brazil and that the court is asking for information the company doesn't have in any case: messages are encypted end-to-end and the service does not store content. Dzodan has since been released. GNI warns that local staff working for services offering encryption may be targeted for arrest or intimidation in many countries. France may soon be among them: at Lawfare, Daniel Severson notes that the French National Assembly has amended the proposed bill on Combating Organized Crime, Terrorism, and Related Financing to impose a fine of up to €350,000 and five years' imprisonment on companies and their executives who refuse to provide authorities in terrorism investigations with data protected by encryption that they created.
Guardian: http://bit.ly/1SFHqKe
GNI: http://bit.ly/1MbJxi1
Lawfare: http://bit.ly/1Rc5HC1

UK: Investigatory powers bill published with little change
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Privacy International reports that the UK government has published the Investigatory Powers bill with the intention of seeing it passed this year. Despite the call by all three Parliamentary reports on the draft bill for greater clarity, consistency, and coherence, the bill has barely changed other than the addition of the word "privacy" to the title of Part 1. In a public letter to the Telegraph signed by more than 100 people and organisations, Open Rights Group called for the bill to be delayed until next year to give sufficient time to think it through. Don't Spy on Us has published a report explaining how to make the bill fit for purpose.
PI: http://bit.ly/1P3S7iH
Telegraph: http://bit.ly/24URwLW
Don't Spy on Us (PDF): http://bit.ly/1MbJUsV

North Korea: Digital isolation
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In a new report, "Connection Denied", Amnesty International outlines the measures to isolate the population from the outside world taken by the government since Kim Jung-un's government came to power in 2011. International calls are blocked for the three million subscribers using the country's domestic mobile phone service, and access to the web is limited to foreigners and a few select citizens. As a result, people who have fled the country have no ability to contact the family members they have left behind.
Amnesty: http://bit.ly/228JrRr

EU: Privacy Shield details published
----------------------------------------------------------------------
EDRi reports that the European Commission and the US Department of Commerce have published the details of Privacy Shield intended to replace Safe Harbor and allow transfers of data to countries such as the US that do not have comparable data protection standards. EDRi finds, however, that Privacy Shield contains no meaningful reforms; EFF describes it as "riddled with surveillance holes"; and EPIC believes it offers less protection than Safe Harbor did. At Papers, Please, Edward Hasbrouck analyses the Judicial Redress Act, which is supposed to answer some of the European Court of Justice's reasons for overturning Safe Harbor by giving European citizens the right to sue US government agencies when they infringe their rights under the Privacy Act (1974). Hasbrouck's conclusion: the Judicial Redress Act is "worthless".
EDRi: http://bit.ly/1QRvRed
EFF: http://bit.ly/1RDRy0V
EPIC: http://bit.ly/21mqo47
Papers Please: http://bit.ly/1MbK5EM

Bitcoin network hits transaction threshold
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The Verge reports that predictions that continued growth in the number of transactions would overwhelm the bitcoin network have proved correct, raising the average time to complete a transaction from 10 minutes to 43 minutes. Shops are beginning to drop the currency. The prospect has been debated by leading bitcoin developers for the past year as they have failed to agree on the right solution to adopt and who are now accusing each other of attacking the network to prove their point.
Verge: http://bit.ly/1TA7Aip

DeepMind's AI defeats Go champion Lee Se-dol
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The Guardian reports that AlphaGo, a program developed by UK-based DeepMind, founded to solve AI as a "moon shot" and acquired by Google in 2014, has defeated the legendary human Go player Lee Se-dol in the first of five matches being held in Seoul, South Korea. Business Insider UK profiles DeepMind "intellectual powerhouse" David Silver. The Royal Society has a video of a presentation given at its May 2015 meeting on machine learning by DeepMind founder Demis Hassabis; in it, he explains how the group began solving progressively more difficult human video games by allowing its algorithms to teach themselves to play each game based solely on the game's own feedback.
Guardian: http://bit.ly/1Rbq48P
BusinessInsider: http://bit.ly/1WeyyKp
YouTube: http://bit.ly/1LgERga


FEATURES AND ANALYSIS
====================
For more features and analysis selected by the Program team, visit:
http://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:oped/

Net of Rights
----------------------------------------------------------------------
This 17-minute film from Article 19 and Coding Rights, "Net of Rights", using interviews collected at the Internet Engineering Task Force meeting, discusses the importance of protecting human rights by protecting the openness of internet standard protocols. The Human Rights Protocol
Considerations research group in the Internet Research Task Force is currently mapping the relationship between human rights and Internet protocols.
Net of Rights: http://bit.ly/1YG9Eoq

Inheriting virtual property
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this blog posting, Andres Guadamuz summarises and comments on new work by Edina Harbinja on the status of accounts in virtual worlds after the original user has died. Such accounts often have real, as well as virtual, economic value, and Harbinja proposes legal reforms that would make the value heritable by creating a limited right of "virtual usufruct".
Jotwell: http://bit.ly/1LWD1Rw

How to hold governments algorithmically accountable
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this Slate article, Nicholas Diakopoulos studies the lack of transparency in algorithms deployed by government to determine everything from qualifying for benefits to the length of prison sentences. To date, even FOIA requests often can't extract information about how they work, often because the code is proprietary. Diakopoulos argues that transparency must be embedded at the beginning.
Slate: http://slate.me/1YG9Kwq

Inside Egypt's Technical Research Department
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In this report, Privacy International studies the workings of the Technical Research Department (TRD), a little-known element of Egypt's intelligence infrastructure. The report also cites research from Citizen Lab, which first revealed the TRD's use of FinFisher spyware, and Hacking Team technologies.
PI: http://bit.ly/1QJNmiL
CitizenLab: http://bit.ly/1RDSe6I

Eavesdropping on 3D printers
----------------------------------------------------------------------
At Gizmag, Nick Lavars reports that researchers at the University of California Irvine have discovered that even encrypted source code for 3D printer designs can be compromised while the printer is in action. A smartphone placed next to the printer can capture the sounds of the movements of the print head as it builds the item layer by layer and later use these to reverse-engineer the design.
Gizmag: http://bit.ly/1YGay4x

***

DIARY
==============
To see more events recommended by the Information Program team, visit:
https://pinboard.in/u:osi_info_program/t:events/. If you would like your event listed in this mail, email info.digest@opensocietyfoundations.org.

Laura Poitras at the Whitney Museum
----------------------------------------
February 5-May 1, 2016
New York, NY
Oscar and Pulitzer Prize-winning Laura Poitras, best known for her documentary film about Edward Snowden, CITIZENFOUR, has turned her journal and FBI files into an exhibit at New York's Whitney Museum documenting her life under surveillance. LAURA POITRAS: ASTRO NOISE is an immersive installation of new work building on topics Poitras has investigated in previous film work, including mass surveillance, the war on terror, the U.S. drone program, Guantánamo Bay Prison, occupation, and torture.
http://bit.ly/1QbMuq2

Nervous Systems: Quantified life and the social question
----------------------------------------
March 10-May 9, 2016
Berlin, Germany
Artists, media historians, and writers collaborate to produce a range of reflections on the quantified self for this exhibition at the Haus der Kulturen der Welt. The exhibition includes "The White Room", a live installation by Tactical Tech that includes consultations, demos, and discussions.
http://bit.ly/21fsO9Y

Ethical Risk Assessment in Biomedical Big Data
----------------------------------------
March 14-15, 2016
Oxford, UK
The two-day symposium, hosted by the Oxford Internet Institute, in association with the Brocher Foundation, will bring together expertise from academia, medicine, industry, and the non-profit sector to assess the ethical risks posed by a number of emerging Big Data applications. Risk assessment is an important step in understanding the potential impact (effects and consequences) of any emerging technology. Applications across a variety of research, clinical and commercial domains will be analysed, including biobanking, public health surveillance, outbreak monitoring, digital epidemiology, behaviour tracking and profiling, and other types of biomedical research.
http://bit.ly/1YCUTmE

Predictive Analytics and Human Rights
----------------------------------------
The 2016 conference, hosted at the Bernstein Institute for Human Rights at the NYU Law School, will leverage the interdisciplinary strengths of the Robert L. Bernstein Institute to consider the human rights implications of the varied uses of predictive analytics by state actors. As a core part of this endeavour, the conference will examine - and seek to advance - the capacity of human rights practitioners to access, evaluate, and challenge risk assessments made through predictive analytics by governments worldwide.
http://bit.ly/1owT4uV

Transparency Camp Online
----------------------------------------
March 19, 2016
Online
This live, participant-driven unconference happens by video chat and/or phone. Bring a topic, project or challenge that you would love to discuss. All participants are empowered to add a discussion topic to the agenda.
http://bit.ly/1SFJeTh

RightsCon
----------------------------------------
March 30-April 1, 2016
San Francisco, CA
Convened by Access Now, RightsCon is the world's leading conference on the issues at the intersection of internet and human rights. The event brings together visionaries, technologists, business leaders, activists, and government representatives from around the world to build strategies, highlight emerging voices, and showcase new technologies & initiatives in pursuit of tomorrow's internet. March 30 will feature Crypto Summit 2.0, a discussion of global encryption policy.
http://bit.ly/I2ZAUZ

We Robot
----------------------------------------
April 1-2, 2016
Miami, Florida
Founded by law professors Michael Froomkin and Ryan Calo, We Robot is a workshop-style conference at which papers in progress on subjects related to robots, law, and policy are discussed and debated with a goal to improving the quality of scholarship in this developing area.
http://bit.ly/1jtd6TT

Global Privacy Summit
----------------------------------------
April 3-4
Washington, DC
The annual meeting of the International Association of Privacy Professionals. Last year's event included keynotes from journalist Glenn Greenwald, author Sarah Lewis, and Google general counsel Kent Walker.
http://bit.ly/1PVL5Ta

25th World Wide Web Conference
----------------------------------------
April 11-15, 2016
Montreal, Canada
The W3C's World Wide Web Conference is an annual international conference on the topics of the future direction of the World Wide Web. The Conference is an outstanding international forum to present and discuss progress in research, development, standards, and applications of the topics related to the Web.
http://bit.ly/1SrCR32

OER16: Open Culture
----------------------------------------
April 19-20
Edinburgh, Scotland
The vision for the conference is to focus on the value proposition of embedding open culture into institutional strategies for learning, teaching, and research. Conference chairs are Melissa Highton, Director of Learning, Teaching, and Web Services at the University of Edinburgh, and Lorna Campbell, OER Liaison at the University of Edinburgh and EDINA Digital Education Manager.
http://bit.ly/1PVLBRj

Tomorrow's Transactions Forum
April 20-21
London, UK
----------------------------------------
Consult Hyperion's annual conference lets anyone interested in the future of electronic transactions debate and discuss any and all ideas, no matter how apparently wacky (such as those that appear in the art competition). Intervention and interaction are welcome; product presentations are banned.
http://bit.ly/1Qc84Fx

TICTeC 2016
----------------------------------------
April 27-29, 2016
Barcelona, Spain
The Impacts of Civic Technology Conference will focus on the impact of civic technology and digital democracy on citizens, decision makers, and governments around the world and discuss themes of engagement, participation, institution, social behaviour, politics, community, digital capability, communication, and ethics relating to the use and study of civic technology.
http://bit.ly/1Qw5kCe

ICOA 2016
----------------------------------------
May 16-17
Montreal, Canada
The 18th International Conference on Open Access aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results about all aspects of Open Access. It also provides the premier interdisciplinary forum for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns, practical challenges encountered and the solutions adopted in the field of Open Access.
http://bit.ly/1XCAD2a

International Conference for E-Democracy and Open Government
----------------------------------------
May 18-20, 2016
Krems, Austria
The International Conference for e-Democracy and Open Government brings together e-democracy, e-participation and open government specialists working in academia, politics, government and business to critically analyse the innovations, issues, ideas and challenges in the networked societies of the digital age.
http://bit.ly/1MPGnmf

Privacy in the Digital Age of Encryption and Anonymity Online
----------------------------------------
May 19-20, 2016
The Hague, Netherlands
This conference on privacy in the digital age of encryption and anonymity online is jointly organised by EIPA and Europol. The main theme of the conference will be the difficulty of balancing privacy and security with a focus on the latest systems of encryption, anonymisation, and pseudonymisation.
http://bit.ly/1p3KDrc

Health Privacy Summit
----------------------------------------
June 6-7
Washington, DC
The 2016 Health Privacy Summit brings together top national and international experts for serious discussion about global health privacy issues and realistic solutions and to ask, Is Big Data effectively the beginning of the end for privacy in health care?
http://bit.ly/1Qw5AkN

Personal Democracy Forum
----------------------------------------
June 9-10
New York, NY
The 2016 Personal Democracy Forum will feature speakers such as Danah Boyd, Kate Crawford, Douglas Rushkoff, and Anil Dash.
http://bit.ly/1ExPHDH

Workshop on the Economics of Information Security
----------------------------------------
June 13-14, 2016
Berkeley, CA
The Workshop on the Economics of Information Security (WEIS) is the leading forum for interdisciplinary scholarship on information security and privacy, combining expertise from the fields of economics, social science, business, law, policy, and computer science.
http://bit.ly/1RgmF6w

OR2016 Conference
----------------------------------------
June 13-16, 2016
Dublin, NL@@
The theme of OR2016 is "Illuminating the World." OR2016 will provide an opportunity to explore the impact of repositories and related infrastructure and processes.
http://bit.ly/1pcUNp4

SOUPS
----------------------------------------
June 22-24
Denver, Colorado
The 12th Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security will bring together an interdisciplinary group of researchers and practitioners in human computer interaction, security, and privacy. The program will feature technical papers, workshops and tutorials, a poster session, panels and invited talks, and lightning talks.
http://bit.ly/1Tn7bwy

21st-Century Literacies for Public Libraries
----------------------------------------
August 10-11, 2016
Philadelphia, PA
At this two-day satellite meeting, presented by IFLA's Public Libraries Section, delegates will share and learn from each other's experiences in developing and delivering services that encompass today's expanded concept of literacy, which includes not only the traditional ability to read and write but proficiency in a range of other literacies such as civic, health, financial, digital, and information.
http://bit.ly/1PZhExo

IFLA World Library and Information Congress
----------------------------------------
August 13-19, 2016
Columbus, OH
The theme of the 82nd IFLA Congress is "Connections. Collaboration. Community." The Congress will feature programmes from myriad library sectors.
http://2016.ifla.org/

Privacy+Security Forum
----------------------------------------
October 24-26, 2016
Washington, DC
Monday, October 24, is devoted to pre-conference workshops and "intensive days" - advanced discussion focused narrowly on a particular topic or industry. Proposals are welcome until April 30, 2016 based on the following guiding principles: bridge the silos between privacy and security; cover issues with depth and rigour; employ interaction, scenario-based learning, and extensive engagement; deliver practical takeaways from each session.
http://bit.ly/1RIzYhV

Mozilla Festival
----------------------------------------
November 6-8, 2016
London, UK
MozFest is an annual celebration of the open Web. Participants are diverse, including engineers, artists, activists, and educators, but share the common belief that the Web can make lives better, unlocks opportunity, spurs creativity, teaches valuable skills, and connects far-flung people and ideas. The Festival seeks to improve the Web with new ideas and creations.
http://bit.ly/1WmxRQ0

***

Hear more from the Information Program!
================================
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================================
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Open Society Foundation, part of the Open Society Foundations, is a company limited by guarantee registered in England and Wales (company number 4571628) and a registered charity (charity number 1105069). Its registered office address is 7th Floor, Millbank Tower, 21-24 Millbank, London SW1P 4QP